The Fall Of Berlin 1945

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The Fall Of Berlin 1945

by Antony Beevor

Penguin Books | April 29, 2003 | Trade Paperback

The Fall Of Berlin 1945 is rated 3.5 out of 5 by 4.
Acclaimed for his vivid re-creations of some of the twentieth century''s most significant battles, Antony Beevor is one of the best known and respected military historians writing today. He now offers readers a gripping, street-level portrait of the harrowing days of January 1945 in Berlin when the vengeful Red Army and beleaguered Nazi forces clashed for a final time. The result was the most gruesome display of brutality in the war, with tanks crushing refugee columns, mass rapes, pillage, and destruction. Hundreds of thousands of German civilians froze to death or were massacred because Nazi officials had forbidden their evacuation. Hitler, half crazed in his bunker, issued wild orders while Stalin was prepared to risk any number of his men to seize the city before the other Allies could get there.

Making full use of newly disclosed material from former Soviet files as well as from German, American, British, French, and Swedish archives, Beevor has reconstructed the different experiences of those millions caught up in the death throes of the Third Reich. The Fall of Berlin 1945 depicts not only the brutality and desperation of a city under siege but also rare moments of extreme humanity and heroism. This account also contains new revelations about the motives behind Stalin''s hurried assault. Sure to appeal to all readers interested in military history and the Second World War, The Fall of Berlin 1945 promises to be the definitive treatment of the subject for years to come.

Format: Trade Paperback

Published: April 29, 2003

Publisher: Penguin Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0142002801

ISBN - 13: 9780142002803

Found in: History

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from History as Thriller Think all history books are like the ones you had to read in university? The dry, boring tomes that would quickly cause an afternoon nap? Then you have not read Anthony Beevor. You feel if your reading the latest Tom Clancy thriller as the events that lead to the end of World War II continue at an ever increasing pace until the Allies take the city. Mr. Beevor is good at setting the scene and providing an informative but gripping narrative of the last days of the Third Reich. Definitley worth a passing glace.
Date published: 2006-08-15
Rated 1 out of 5 by from tragic indeed I have to agree with Mr. Shaleb's review of the book as disappointing and I would add frustrating. There is so much more that could and should have been done with the story(ies). I felt I was reading an endless chain of National Enquirer clips. Perhaps the most frustrating part was the truly stupid attempts to portray whole peoples as X or Y and the Germans and Russians in particular as lesser than the Western armies. Such things as writing that because Americans had plenty of cigarettes there was no need for them to rape is really ludicruous but my favorite has to be the author's portrayal of Hitler as being a pedophile because he was pinching young boys cheeks. The book was a disjointed litany of stories meant to be shocking combined with lurid and inane analyses of their root causes. If you have any serious interest in history at all stay away from this book; it's the tragedy
Date published: 2003-06-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The horror of war I purchased this book with the intention of learning more of the military operations on Russian Front. This book is that and way more. The human tragedy is also included in terrifying detail. Turn off the phone and find a quiet place to read this one, it's that good. The maps are a great help in understanding the flow of events. Highly recommended
Date published: 2002-09-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Disappointing Unlike Beever's masterful recollection of the siege of Stalingrad, I found few worthy sections in this book. Beever fails to create a coherent flow of ideas, but rather strings together several unrelated stories. He goes to enormous pains to reconstruct, over and over again, identical stories of rape and pillaging faced by the German civilians at the hands of the advancing Red Armies, to the detriment of the development of the rest of the book. Beever also makes constant reference to places that are not to be found on any of the comprehensive maps at the front of the book, and most of the photo illustrations included have been used in other texts prior to Beever's. All in all, this book was a disappointment.
Date published: 2002-08-17

– More About This Product –

The Fall Of Berlin 1945

by Antony Beevor

Format: Trade Paperback

Published: April 29, 2003

Publisher: Penguin Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0142002801

ISBN - 13: 9780142002803

Read from the Book

Berlin in the New Year Berliners, gaunt from short rations and stress, had little to celebrate at Christmas in 1944. Much of the capital of the Reich had been reduced to rubble by bombing raids. The Berlin talent for black jokes had turned to gallows humour. The quip of that unfestive season was: ''Be practical: give a coffin.'' The mood in Germany had changed exactly two years before. Rumours had begun to circulate just before Christmas 1942 that General Paulus''s Sixth Army had been encircled on the Volga by the Red Army. The Nazi regime found it hard to admit that the largest formation in the whole of the Wehrmacht was doomed to annihilation in the ruins of Stalingrad and in the frozen steppe outside. To prepare the country for bad news, Joseph Goebbels, the Reichsminister for Propaganda, had announced a ''German Christmas'', which in National Socialist terms meant austerity and ideological determination, not candles and pine wreaths and singing Heilige Nacht . By 1944, the traditional roast goose had become a distant memory. In streets where the façade of a house had collapsed, pictures could still be seen hanging on the walls of what had been a sitting room or bedroom. The actress Hildegard Knef gazed at a piano left exposed on the remnants of a floor. Nobody could get to it, and she wondered how long it would be before it tumbled down to join the rubble below. Messages from families were scrawled on gutted buildings to tell a son returning from the front that they
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Table of Contents

The Fall Of Berlin 1945 List of Illustrations
Maps
Glossary
Preface

1. Berlin in the New Year
2. The ''House of Cards'' on the Vistula
3. Fire and Sword and ''Noble Fury''
4. The Great Winter Offensive
5. The Charge to the Oder
6. East and West
7. Clearing the Rear Areas
8. Pomerania and the Older Bridgeheads
9. Objective Berlin
10. The Kamarilla and the General Staff
11. Preparing the Coup de Grâce
12. Waiting for the Onslaught
13. Americans on the Elbe
14. Eve of Battle
15. Zhukov on the Reitwein Spur
16. Seelow and the Spree
17. The Führer''s Last Birthday
18. The Flight of the Golden Pheasants
19. The Bombarded City
20. False Hopes
21. Fighting in the City
22. Figthing in the Forest
23. The Betrayal of the Will
24. Führerdämmerung
25. Reich Chancellery and Reichstag
26. The End of the Battle
27. Vae Victis!
28. The Man on the White Horse

References
Source Notes
Select Bibliography
Index

From the Publisher

Acclaimed for his vivid re-creations of some of the twentieth century''s most significant battles, Antony Beevor is one of the best known and respected military historians writing today. He now offers readers a gripping, street-level portrait of the harrowing days of January 1945 in Berlin when the vengeful Red Army and beleaguered Nazi forces clashed for a final time. The result was the most gruesome display of brutality in the war, with tanks crushing refugee columns, mass rapes, pillage, and destruction. Hundreds of thousands of German civilians froze to death or were massacred because Nazi officials had forbidden their evacuation. Hitler, half crazed in his bunker, issued wild orders while Stalin was prepared to risk any number of his men to seize the city before the other Allies could get there.

Making full use of newly disclosed material from former Soviet files as well as from German, American, British, French, and Swedish archives, Beevor has reconstructed the different experiences of those millions caught up in the death throes of the Third Reich. The Fall of Berlin 1945 depicts not only the brutality and desperation of a city under siege but also rare moments of extreme humanity and heroism. This account also contains new revelations about the motives behind Stalin''s hurried assault. Sure to appeal to all readers interested in military history and the Second World War, The Fall of Berlin 1945 promises to be the definitive treatment of the subject for years to come.

About the Author

Antony Beevor is the author of a number of histories, including The Spanish Civil War and Stalingrad, which has been published in twenty-three languages and was awarded the first Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction, the Wolfson History Prize, and the Hawthornden Prize for Literature.

Editorial Reviews

"There was no more hellish place on earth than Berlin in 1944...[and] Beevor has created haunting images of the war''s final days." — The New York Times Book Review "Beevor is...a superb writer, a diligent researcher and a master of battlefield detail." — The Chicago Tribune "A tale drenched in drama and blood, heroism and cowardice, loyalty and betrayal." —Jonathan Yardley in The Washington Post "Antony Beevor is a British historian of great distinction and range, who has written widely on military affairs in the twentieth century. His history of the battle of Stalingrad was awarded the Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction, the Wolfson History Prize and the Hawthornden Prize for Literature. To write a successor to that excellent chronicle of the savagery of modern warfare could not have been easy. . . But Beevor once more demonstrates his mastery of his sources, including newly discovered material from Soviet archives, and his skill in describing complicated operations." —Gordon Craig in the New York Review of Books . "A quite splendid book, one which combines a calm and scholarly narrative with an unrelenting moral indignation at what he has uncovered. It stands as a superbly lucid examination of one of the most dreadful battles in world history." —Kevin Myers in the Irish Times . "With [the Red Army] travels Antony Beevor—understanding the wider strategic issues as well as feeling the plight of the simple s
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