The Fall of the House of Usher

by Matthew K Manning

Capstone | September 25, 2013 | Hardcover |

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Edgar Allan Poe''s gothic tale of the crumbling Usher mansion -- and its ghastly inhabitants -- comes to life as never before in this one of a kind graphic novel adaptation.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 72 Pages, 10.24 × 6.3 × 0.79 in

Published: September 25, 2013

Publisher: Capstone

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1434230244

ISBN - 13: 9781434230249

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– More About This Product –

The Fall of the House of Usher

by Matthew K Manning

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 72 Pages, 10.24 × 6.3 × 0.79 in

Published: September 25, 2013

Publisher: Capstone

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1434230244

ISBN - 13: 9781434230249

From the Publisher

Edgar Allan Poe''s gothic tale of the crumbling Usher mansion -- and its ghastly inhabitants -- comes to life as never before in this one of a kind graphic novel adaptation.

About the Author

There has never been any doubt about Poe's enormous literary significance, but, with regard to his ultimate artistic merit, there has been considerable disagreement. To some he is little more than a successful charlatan, whose literary performances are only a virtuoso's display of stunning, but finally shallow, effects. Others, however, are struck by Poe's profound probing of the human psyche, his philosophical sophistication, and his revolutionary attitude toward literary language. No doubt both sides of this argument are in part true in their assessments. Poe's work is very uneven, sometimes reaching great literary heights, at other times striking the honest reader as meaningless, pathetic, or simply wrong-headed. This is not surprising, considering the personal turmoil that characterized so much of Poe's short life. Poe was extreme in his literary views and practices; balance and equilibrium were not literary values that he prized. Scorning the didactic element in poetry, Poe sought to separate beauty from morality. In his best poems, such as "The City in the Sea" (1836), he achieved an intensification of sound sufficient to threaten the common sense of the poetic line and release a buried, even a morbid, sense that would enchant the reader by the sonic pitch of the poem. Defining poetry as "the rhythmic creation of beauty," Poe not only sought the dream buried beneath the poetic vision---Coleridge had already done that---but also abandoned the moral rationale that gave th
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