The Great Gatsby

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The Great Gatsby

by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Scribner | September 30, 2004 | Trade Paperback

The Great Gatsby is rated 3.6765 out of 5 by 34.
The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.

The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 192 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.5 in

Published: September 30, 2004

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0743273567

ISBN - 13: 9780743273565

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from A wonderful flight into an older era with almost seemingly magical character. I watched the movie before I read the book. I actually had to read this book for book club and was great-full for the change of pace. The last book was over 500 pages and still took me a day to read either way, but I actually like The Great Gatsby's movie which was spot on the book. I was glad this was the book chosen for Book Club. I felt that Gatsby was a good character, but felt confused by him. He seemed to contradict himself in some situations but I felt he was a character developed well. He was by far one of my favourites in this book. my other favourite was probably Nick, the narrator. We knew the most about him, as it was from his point of view. I felt Nick was a good narrator as he would explain things that some audiences may not understand. Daisy's character seemed to be left to open in the end of the book. She was one of my least favourite characters because of the lack of love she shows for Gatsby in the end of the book and that made me lose all the respect I had for her. After seeing the ending in the movie, I had kind of hoped the book would be different but, like I said earlier the movie was spot-on. I was warned ahead of time I might have a hard time reading this because it was written "way back when" but honestly I had no problem reading it. I actually liked it more than I thought I would because it was one of the classics. I generally don't like classics for I feel it has a lack of romance, which I can't read a book without, but this one was actually really good. Rating: 6.9/10 Parental Rating: 14+
Date published: 2014-04-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good Read The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Where do I begin with this one? Gatsby is a classic and was on my optional reading list for school. I had chosen another novel to read but decided to read this one too because there was a movie coming to theaters that I had a major interest in seeing. I heard from many people that this was “the best book they have ever read” and that it “kept them entertained for hours”. However, when I read it, I did not experience the same thing. Even though it was very well written, I found this novel uninteresting and hard to get into. Maybe it was because this novel is almost a century old and the diction of writers has changed since then. Maybe it was because I read it at a time that I didn’t have a lot going on and was using this novel to keep me entertained. Or maybe it was because I had such high expectations for it. Overall, The Great Gatsby tells a great story of a man and his parties. It is a deep novel that will invoke some deep thinking. I personally think the movie was more enjoyable than the novel, quite possibly because there was less description of what was going on and more dialogue. I have found that I enjoy novels with some description but with an equal amount of dialogue just to keep things interesting. I believe that if this novel were to have more conversational portions, I would have enjoyed it a lot more. All in all, if you are looking for a thought-provoking novel that must be read more than once to get the full meaning; then this is one for you!
Date published: 2014-01-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Is opulence king? Guess it may fair well in some circles... It took a little to get into the story and characters (as I had a hard time relating to any of them), but also takes place in the late 20s/early 30s in the Jazz Age. You meet uber-rich couple who don't show love to each other or their child. But end up broken-hearted with drama that entails this classic tale. You may be rich, but happiness may not find you.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A modern classic "The Great Gatsby" is widely considered a modern classic, and I can easily understand why: it has depth, emotion and an "eloquence" that is hard to describe. F. Scott Fitzgerald creates a haunting look at the richest poor man in the world, Jay Gatsby. Gatsby isn't everything that he appears to be. He hosts all encompassing parties where almost everyone from New York is invited to attend, lives in a mansion, and has servants galore, but in the end he has nothing. Now the reason I did not give this book more stars is because there were occasional stretches of tedium that did not focus on Gatsby at all and did not seem to have anything to do with the main plot. Given that the book is only 183 pages long, those short stretches seemed to be longer than usual and really took from the flow of the book. Still very good despite the not so happy, but expected, ending.
Date published: 2013-10-24
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Once was enough So I really wanted to re-read Gatsby before the movie opens at Christmas 2012. I had read this book in high school and was afraid that I had missed the enjoyment factor of the book because I was too busy over-analyzing the story for an english project. However, turned out I really didn't miss much of anything. The language Fitzgerald uses really speaks to the excesses of Gatsby and his elite friends, turns of phrase such as "bleeding fluently" really stand out for me. However, there really wasn't much to the story itself, and I grew bored, pushing myself to read through to the end. One read through was definitely enough (but I am looking forward to Hollywood's version!)
Date published: 2014-07-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great! The Great Gatsby is one of those books that everyone should read at some point in their life. The book is getting close to being a century old and is still present in pop culture. Like many ‘classics’ it is tough to put your finger on what exactly is so great about The Great Gatsby. All I can say is that there is just something about it. An aura that very few works of art can achieve and continue to radiate many years later. It is a story where all that glitters is not gold. Where a person’s social status may not correlate with their character. It also has the original legendary playboy Jay Gatsby whose parties are so well described by the narrator they grab a unique hold of your imagination. The reader will easily find intrigue. I found myself amazed at how universal the story remains despite its deep roots in a period of history. The book captures a time where the economy boomed and emotions were volatile but the human story is where the real magic is. To me, The Great Gatsby is ‘the’ Great American Novel. Check out my first published work Defenseless
Date published: 2014-03-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Classic Read If possible I would have given this look 3.5. It was an enjoyable little read. It was not an absorbing book, but the plot I found realitivly simple and easy to follow. This is a classic worth the time and energy to read.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A school book becoming a favourite. In my grade 11 high school English class we had to read this book and write an essay on it. Normally I don't read books, so starting to read this one was a challenge. At first, I thought the book was a little dry and confusing. All the symbolism within the book made me think too much and made me not enjoy the story. After that assignment, I decided to give this book another try. Now without the pressure of school, I was able to enjoy the book more and it has become one of my favourites. Even though I know nothing about the American Dream, this book put me in the place of Gatsby's shoes and brought me into his mindset. I wonder if the American Dream is the same for every American as it was for Gatsby.
Date published: 2013-10-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful Jewel of the Bygone Era I like the charm you get in this book. If you know the history and the things that happened in the U.S. during the Roaring Twenties, I bet you can read through this classic. It is about a love story when love between a man and a woman is still a serious affair. Women are treated like trophies by men (especially rich men). It is an interesting novel to read over your long days. It might be a classic but is still, nonetheless, a really good book to read when travelling. It takes you in a whole other time when money is abundant and when lost love is filled with bittersweet memories.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Read The Great Gatsby is possibly the most well-loved of all of Fitzgerald's books for its explorations of the American dream and lost love. Basically, the book is about a man named Gatsby who is madly in love with Daisy. Years later, he becomes rich and throws extravagant parties at his place to try and attract her. The results however, only end in the unraveling of Gatsby's beloved dream. It is not the most thrilling read; only one or two parts were really exciting, and the book paces on at a slow, leisurely place. It is not as great as I have seen reviews to make it out to be, but it certainly is a good piece of classic English literature. It is also very short, so if you are looking for a good short read, give the Great Gatsby a gander.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 1 out of 5 by from horrible! This has got to be one of the worst books I have ever read. From the beginning to the end, nothing is really interesting. The plot was boring and at the end it seemed like all the characters we're killed off to finish the story. I don't know how this is "a classic"
Date published: 2014-07-10
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Hard to follow If you like a book about how dramatic others peoples lives are then you will like this book. It is like a soap opera and all about the characters. Personally I did not like this book at all mostly to do with falling asleep trying to realize who is having an affair with who.
Date published: 2014-07-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Character Analysis This book is definitely a book all about the characters. You have to take a step back, reflect on all the events passed, and dissect all the characters to fully understand their actions. I know that is a very generalized description, but that's one what I can put it. It may not be a page turner, but it's a thinker.
Date published: 2013-10-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from good Good book, chris browne is a noob
Date published: 2013-10-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from good Good book, chris browne is a noob
Date published: 2014-09-28
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not a fan It may be a classic, but I had to force myself to keep reading. I love to read, and I found this particular book kind of painful.
Date published: 2014-07-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Worth reading again I first read this novel in the 10th grade, and hated it. I decided to pick up again 10 years later and am glad I did as I thoroughly enjoyed it the second time through. Fitzgerald's 1920's suburban landscape really comes to life throughout the novel, so much so that I wish it was longer than the 100-odd pages in order to spend more time getting to know the intriguing characters - especially the enigmatic Gatsby. This Wordsworth edition has a great introuduction by Guy Reynolds which enlightens the reader about the contemporary atmosphere that Fitzgerald creates - a world full of cars, telephones and other such technology that was just becoming commonplace at the time of the publication. This edition also includes many footnotes by the editors, which while often banal did come in handy in identifying many early pop culture references.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read This Again Okay, admittedly this is a very safe pick - probably all of you were forced to read this classic of F. Scott Fitzgerald in high school. But the reason this 1920's novel is still studied is it's continued relevance to how things are today. The yearning we all feel to "live the good life", as how it's portrayed by the media, has never been stronger, so surely we can all identify with Gatsby's hunger to be accepted as part of society's elite. Of course, it's all an illusion, isn't it. As Gatsby finds out the hard way, and as the narrator and the reader come to realize. F. Scott Fitzgerald had enormous success as a young writer, and then faded quickly, dying at a relatively young age, mired in obscurity.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from For the hopeless romantic.... I never expected to name The Great Gatsby as my favourite book of all time but when I finished it I knew that it had to be. There's something magical and lyrical about Fitzgerald's writing; its more than writing it's like art! If you're in love with love and the beauty of words then do not hesitate to pick up this book! "All I kept thinking over and over was you can't live forever, you can't live forever...."
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Then the book gets really good around page 120. Then it's over. So I started reading this book, and I found it really boring. Okay, there's this guy, Gatsby, who's kind of mysterious and it turns out he changed his name. Maybe I missed a crucial detail, but his "transformation" is simply not that interesting. Then the book gets really good around page 120. Then it's over.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Intellectually Stimulating! The life of Jay Gatsby is facinating in itself that he depicts the ideal American dream that many of us strives for. Fitzgerald is brilliant in depicting the ideal and intellectually critiques American lifestyles, and our need to be sucessful as a cult. Although it was a hard read for a beginner, once you read deeper into the meaning and the symbolism, you enter into a world of facination for Jay Gatsby; and the lifestyle he chooses in order to achieve the ultimate success (Diasy). What the story tells us, is that although the American dream is idealized as something that can be achieved in a liberal society by everyone and anyone through hard work, the reality is, not every one can attain it- success is abstract and socially constructed so that only certain people can have it. Fitzgerald writes brilliantly in ways that uses the system of metaphors to help us understand Jay Gastby, and in turn. understand something about ourselves. Highly recommended!
Date published: 2013-10-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from "They carelessly smashed up things and people..." Fitzgerald's writing is the most beautiful I've ever read! Only he could ever pen the words, "young clerks waiting in the dusk wasting the most precious moments of night and life...". the story in it's short beauty is perfect! i find no flaws in it and i highly recmmmend it to anybody with a romantic spirit.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Ain't we got fight club: Not really a review of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby There is much I could say about THE GREAT GATSBY that would do justice to its already established place in the literary canon. It is a great book. Even if it isn’t one of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s best, it still stands as one of the great novels that you can read over and over again. Given what I can’t say about it, I’ll write about what I can say about it. Fans of Chuck Palahniuk may already know this. THE GREAT GATSBY was Palahniuk’s model for FIGHT CLUB. Early on Palahniuk identified it as the book most influential on his interest and writings (Illiterary). On several other occasions he’s also remarked: “I think that the central, most American literary theme is the invention of the self. We see it in Henry James’s Bostonians; we see it in The Great Gatsby; we see it in Breakfast at Tiffany’s…” (Powells interview; see also A.V. Club interview). He also mentions it in the foreword to the latest edition of Ken Kesey’s Cuckoo’s Nest. Palahniuk’s work swirls around the reinvention of identity. Over and over again. Jay Gatsby is one of the great reinventions of identity and for what? Love. So, how surprising is this? Jay Gatsby, Daisy Buchanan, and Nick Carraway. Tyler Durden, Marla Singer, and the narrator. See my February 2008 post in the Reading Chuck Palahniuk archive for the links cited above. There are too many great lines and quotes from the novel to begin even the vaguest sample, so I won’t.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Symbolic meaning Gatsby is a great novel. I really enjoyed this one in school and found myself reading ahead of the assigned chapters. I found the most interesting part of this book was the symbolism throughout the whole thing. Fitzgerald takes the time to actually discribe the colors of their outfits and the movement of the characters. Even now I find myself picking up great classics such as this one to read for my own leasure as an adult.
Date published: 2013-10-28
Rated 1 out of 5 by from A chore to read Perhaps it is because I am from a far younger generation, but I found the story to be extremely dull (I couldn't even sit through the movie), and the the quality of the actual writing to be sub-par.
Date published: 2014-07-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic Book The Great Gatsby is very riveting. I found myself having troubles setting it down. I decided to dip my toes into a new reading genre and I'm very glad I did so. This book gives us all some analysis and connection with certain aspects of life. I don’t know about other readers but at points you could completely empathize with the characters and what was happening to them. It truly gives an essence of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s insight on life, personalities, relationships and how they are interconnected, and in some odd cases suffocate you. At worst relationships can undermine your better judgment, and take over your sensibility. You are constantly making judgements about characters, and they change very quickly. We get to ‘know’ the characters, and feel from Nick’s view. We explore the worse and best of falling into your past. He makes you think a bit. I’m sure some would call this book tedious. I just think those people need to give it a chance and read into the societal and psychological motions. It is timeless, and you can absolutely imagine this twentieth century book with modern day issues. This is a stunning success. I can’t even begin to tell you how much I adore Fitzgerald’s writing. It's a classic.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great Gatsby is the true definition of the romantic (and tragic) hero which is what makes this novel so intriguing. The hope he has to be with Daisy gives him the fierce determination needed to get him what he wants. But like Hamlet, he is corrupted by the world which surrounds him, turning this inspiring characteristic into a flaw. As Fitzgerald's most famous novel, "The Great Gatsby" is heralded by critics and perfect for any idealist.
Date published: 2013-10-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dramatic story-telling at its finest The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, a great novel and another one of my favourites. Its story is dramatic, sutle and in the end, heartbreaking. The novel tells us about a rich man named Gatsby, not cut out for the life of riches and fame, who throws parties constantly to see if he can meet his old love again. The theme shows us the troubles of the rich and famous and that is anybody when you are rich ever your friend? When you die, will anybody care? A tale that sticks with you and saddens you. First rate novel.
Date published: 2013-10-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent work, great read A startling and eye opening portrayal of not only life in the 1920s, but of love, compassion and human nature. I chose this book for my English 30-1 novel study and I fell in love with this book. The vivid details, the drama, the tragedy that unfolds at the end... This is writing at its best!
Date published: 2013-10-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fitzgerald's Masterpiece Some readers say that the book fails to show us life in the Roaring 20's; that was never its claim. It never said what the 20's were supposed to be like; it's just when the novel takes place simply to establish the character of Jay Gatsby and his rise to fame. Actually it does have a lot on the 20's, you just have to be perceptive; those were the years of bootlegging and high-crime, and that's how Gatsby establishes himself. It also never claims to leave readers with a revelation on the meaning of life or love or ANY such thing as that. Is there a plot? Yes, but the plot is not important. This is a character-driven story, as were most Modernist pieces, for they strove to show the experiences of the regular people. Please keep in mind that this book doesn't try to teach us anything except for what we seem to take away from it in our own opinion. If you have this version of the novel then look at the first sentence of the preface. Now, as for my opinion on why this is a masterpiece, there is one reason above all others: it is very readable. The Great Gatsby may not seduce me with its intricate devices, but the characters hold me in reading limbo. They are fantastically developed, such as Nick and his obsession for Gatsby, or Gatsby himself, who does so much for the love of Daisy. Daisy and Tom irritate me with their selfish ways, thinking they can ruin the lives of the poor simply because they're rich. This book is readable because of its characters and its smooth, easy to read langauge. It is a masterpiece in all respects.
Date published: 2013-10-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from ITS DAMN GREAT no one knows what they are talking about. he is not a failed author, rather this american classic is just overrated and they come in expecting this great masterpiece and unfulfillable desires that cannot be met in reality. the book while does not acclaim to any spectacular or different context and resembles pioneer soap operas it is a incredible book to study and see beneath the underlying surfaces such as symbolism and other devices used that cannot be matched with just any other literary piece.
Date published: 2013-10-24
Rated 2 out of 5 by from What's So Great About It? The Great Gatsby is, quite frankly, a failed work on Fitzgerald's behalf. The characters are under-developed, and what little there is to know of them is detestable, the so-called creative symbolism doesn't take a Rhodes Scholar to figure out, and there is little insight into the Roaring '20's era which so few can relate to. Any tolerable aspects of this book are ruined by the fact that it is forced upon us in high school. Also, avoid the film versions if you can - they are equally painful!
Date published: 2014-07-10
Rated 2 out of 5 by from The not-so-great-Gatsby This "american classic" failed to interest me despite its acclaim. I read this book years after having finishing high-school, despite the fact that in many english courses, it is required reading. I found the novel to be uninspiring, and it failed to capture my attention. Although seen as a contemporary classic, the audience will have a hard time relating to main characters that embody the life-style of the elite. The length of this novel hindered this reader the ability to identify with the characters, however, its berevity ended my dissatisfaction before I could invest too much of my interest. Please, ONLY read this book when forced to by the school board.
Date published: 2014-07-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Great Gatsby This novella is perfect for those who want to read the classics but don't like long stories. It is set in the infamous Jazz Age of the roaring twenties and Fitzgerald perfectly captures the qualities of this era. He writes from experience with great insight. As well as being a love story, it is a commentary on human nature and American society. You will like some characters and dislike others; the elusive Gatsby will keep you guessing.
Date published: 2013-10-24

– More About This Product –

The Great Gatsby

by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 192 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.5 in

Published: September 30, 2004

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0743273567

ISBN - 13: 9780743273565

Read from the Book

CHAPTER I In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since. “Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.” He didn’t say any more, but we’ve always been unusually communicative in a reserved way, and I understood that he meant a great deal more than that. In consequence, I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me and also made me the victim of not a few veteran bores. The abnormal mind is quick to detect and attach itself to this quality when it appears in a normal person, and so it came about that in college I was unjustly accused of being a politician, because I was privy to the secret griefs of wild, unknown men. Most of the confidences were unsought—frequently I have feigned sleep, preoccupation, or a hostile levity when I realized by some unmistakable sign that an intimate revelation was quivering on the horizon; for the intimate revelations of young men, or at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions. Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope. I am still a little afraid of missing something if I forget that, as my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat, a sense of the fundamental decencies is parcelle
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From the Publisher

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.

The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.

About the Author

F(rancis) Scott Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on September 24, 1896. He was educated at Princeton University and served in the U.S. Army from 1917 to 1919, attaining the rank of second lieutenant. In 1920 Fitzgerald married Zelda Sayre, a young woman of the upper class, and they had a daughter, Frances. Fitzgerald is perhaps best known for his short stories and novels, but his many contributions to American literature also include plays, poetry, music, and letters. He is now highly regarded as an American writer. Ernest Hemingway, who was greatly influenced by Fitzgerald's short stories, wrote that Fitzgerald's talent was "as fine as the dust on a butterfly's wing." Yet during his lifetime Fitzgerald never had a best-selling novel and, toward the end of his life, he worked sporadically as a screenwriter at motion picture studios in Los Angeles. There he contributed to scripts for such popular films as Winter Carnival and Gone with the Wind. Fitzgerald's work is inseparable from the Roaring 20s. Berenice Bobs Her Hair and A Diamond As Big As The Ritz, are two short stories included in his collections, Tales of the Jazz Age and Flappers and Philosophers. His first novel The Beautiful and Damned was flawed but set up Fitzgerald's major themes of the fleeting nature of youthfulness and innocence, unattainable love, and middle-class aspiration for wealth and respectability, derived from his own courtship of Zelda. This Side of Paradise (1920) was Fitzgerald's first u
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Editorial Reviews

James Dickey Now we have an American masterpiece in its final form: the original crystal has shaped itself into the true diamond. This is the novel as Fitzgerald wished it to be, and so it is what we have dreamed of, sleeping and waking
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