The Ice Queen

Kobo eBook available

read instantly on your Kobo or tablet.

buy the ebook now

The Ice Queen

by HOFFMAN ALICE

Key Porter Books | June 13, 2008 | Hardcover

The Ice Queen is rated 4.5 out of 5 by 2.
A solitary New Jersey librarian whose favorite book is a guide to suicide methods is struck by lightning in Alice Hoffman''s superb novel, The Ice Queen. Orphaned at the age of eight after angrily wishing she would never see her mother again, our heroine found herself frozen emotionally: "I was the child who stomped her feet and made a single wish and in so doing ended the whole world‹my world, at any rate."Her brother Ned solved the pain of their mother''s death by becoming a meteorologist: applying reason and logic to bad weather. Eventually, he invites our heroine to move down to Florida, where he teaches at a university.Here, while trying to swat a fly, she is struck by lightning (the resulting neurological damage includes an inability to see the color red).Orlon County turns out to receive two thirds of all the lightning strikes in Florida each year, and our heroine soon becomes drawn into the mysteries of lightning: the withering of trees and landscape near a strike, the medical traumas and odd new abilities of victims, the myths of renewal.Although a recluse, she becomes fascinated by a legendary local farmer nicknamed Lazarus Jones, said to have beaten death after a lightning strike: to have seen the other side and come back.The burning match to her cool reserve--her personal unguided tour through Hades--Lazarus will prove to be the talisman that restores her to girlhood innocence and possibility.Hoffman''s story advances with a feline economy of language and movement--not a word spared for the color of the sky, unless the color of the sky factors into the narrative.Among the authors who have played with the fairy tale''s harsh mercies (e.g. Margaret Atwood, Angela Carter), Hoffman has the closest understanding of the primal fears that drive the genre, and why, perhaps, we never outgrow fairy stories, but only learn to substitute dull, wholesome qualities like personal initiative or good timing for the elements that raise the hairs on our neck and send us scrambling for the light switch. --Regina Marler

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 224 pages, 9.6 × 6.3 × 1 in

Published: June 13, 2008

Publisher: Key Porter Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0316058599

ISBN - 13: 9780316058599

Found in: Fiction and Literature

save 76%

  • Out of stock online

$2.00  ea

Online Price

$7.99 List Price

Cart

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Major Spoiler Alert-Hauntingly Beautiful Ice Queen Alice Hoffman Alice Hoffman's, Ice Queen is a hauntingly beautiful look at loss and learning to let go, and learning to love and appreciate what you what you have. Hoffman leads you to places in your heart books can rarely take you. She writes prose with the skill of a poet. It will make you slow down and savour every aching word. It follows the life of an eight year old who thinks her mother dies after she wishes her so. Their father had taken off years ago, so her and her brother are raised by their grandmother. The young girl does not allow herself to love, because to love is to lose. She doesn't allow herself boyfriends, just casual relationships. When her grandmother dies, she moves to Florida to be closer to her brother and his wife, and she doesn't even allow herself to become close to them. Then she is struck by lightening, and after her near death experience, her brother and sister teach her to live and love again. Her brother is a meteorologist, and gets her involved in a study for survivors of lightening strikes, and she finally learns to make friends. She finds out about a survivor outside the study who came back to life after being dead for 40 minutes. She begins a torrid affair with him to help her forget and ignore her pain and other effects of her condition, but for the first time in her life she wants more, To know more about him and his secrets. She is also confronted with her brother's experience of being terminally ill with cancer, with a baby on the way. She finally gets to know him and her sister-in-law. As she watches her brother die, she learns how to finally live and love, by watching his relationship with his wife. This makes her finally understand the comment of a former lover a homicide detective, when she asked him what the best way to die was. e told her it was to "live and live well." When Nina senses her brother will not live to see the birth of his child, she nearly bankrupts herself to send him to a medivac plane to northern California to experience the Monarch Butterfly migration. She also become her sister-in-laws breathing coach and niece's Godmother. Nina eventually moves back to New Jersey and opens up to life. This book is ripe with symbolism, from bats and moles, to the metamorphosis of the butterflies, as in emerging from the dark and change and rebirth. I read this one a while back and wrote a personal review in my book journal, and it brought tears to my eyes again as I wrote this. It was such a brilliantly executed book, I cried several times while reading it. There is not a thing I can think as a criticism on this book, plain brilliance that is pure Hoffman.
Date published: 2010-02-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Good Read! I can tell you right off the bat that this isn't the kind of book I'm used to reading. However, I truly did like it. I had a hard time trying to get through the beginning, mainly because of the character's despression and frame of mind. I've seen depression first-hand (my best friend) and know what it can do to a person and the people around them. And it's not what that person does to come out of her shell, but the people around you. Just like this character. I honestly believe that had she not been struck by lightning, her life may have not turned out the way it did. I think it took that cataclysmic to help the start of unravel. I'm glad that she got to know her brother; I'm glad that she had Larazus for the length of time, and I'm glad that Nina helped her completely free of her shell. I believe that if it hadn't been for Nina, I don't think this story would have turned out the same way. And as weird as this seems, I didn't mind it much, but did anyone else notice that the main character, whoever she is, didn't have a name? Not once was her name mentioned in this book. Although that struck me odd, it truly didn't have an effect to the story - just something that I noticed at the end of the novel. A good read!
Date published: 2008-02-05

– More About This Product –

The Ice Queen

by HOFFMAN ALICE

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 224 pages, 9.6 × 6.3 × 1 in

Published: June 13, 2008

Publisher: Key Porter Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0316058599

ISBN - 13: 9780316058599

About the Book

From the bestselling author of "Practical Magic" comes a miraculous, enthralling tale of a woman who is struck by lightning, and finds her frozen heart is suddenly burning. A magical story of passion, loss, and renewal, this work is Hoffman at her best.

From the Publisher

A solitary New Jersey librarian whose favorite book is a guide to suicide methods is struck by lightning in Alice Hoffman''s superb novel, The Ice Queen. Orphaned at the age of eight after angrily wishing she would never see her mother again, our heroine found herself frozen emotionally: "I was the child who stomped her feet and made a single wish and in so doing ended the whole world‹my world, at any rate."Her brother Ned solved the pain of their mother''s death by becoming a meteorologist: applying reason and logic to bad weather. Eventually, he invites our heroine to move down to Florida, where he teaches at a university.Here, while trying to swat a fly, she is struck by lightning (the resulting neurological damage includes an inability to see the color red).Orlon County turns out to receive two thirds of all the lightning strikes in Florida each year, and our heroine soon becomes drawn into the mysteries of lightning: the withering of trees and landscape near a strike, the medical traumas and odd new abilities of victims, the myths of renewal.Although a recluse, she becomes fascinated by a legendary local farmer nicknamed Lazarus Jones, said to have beaten death after a lightning strike: to have seen the other side and come back.The burning match to her cool reserve--her personal unguided tour through Hades--Lazarus will prove to be the talisman that restores her to girlhood innocence and possibility.Hoffman''s story advances with a feline economy of language and movement--not a word spared for the color of the sky, unless the color of the sky factors into the narrative.Among the authors who have played with the fairy tale''s harsh mercies (e.g. Margaret Atwood, Angela Carter), Hoffman has the closest understanding of the primal fears that drive the genre, and why, perhaps, we never outgrow fairy stories, but only learn to substitute dull, wholesome qualities like personal initiative or good timing for the elements that raise the hairs on our neck and send us scrambling for the light switch. --Regina Marler

About the Author

Alice Hoffman was born in New York City on March 16, 1952 and grew up on Long Island. After graduating from high school in 1969, she attended Adelphi University, from which she received a BA, and then was a Mirrellees Fellowship at the Stanford University Creative Writing Center, which she attended in 1973 and 74, receiving an MA in creative writing. She lives near Boston.

Editorial Reviews

""Alice Hoffman takes seemingly ordinary lives and lets us see and feel extraordinary things"
Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart