The Invention of Hugo Cabret

by Brian Selznick
Illustrator Brian Selznick

March 1, 2007 | Hardcover

The Invention of Hugo Cabret is rated 4.9231 out of 5 by 13.
Orphan, clock keeper, and thief, Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. But when his world suddenly interlocks — like the gears of the clocks he keeps — with an eccentric, bookish girl and a bitter old man who runs a toy booth in the train station, Hugo''s undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, and a hidden message from Hugo''s dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

With more than three hundred pages of original drawings, and combining elements of picture book, graphic novel, and film, Brian Selznick breaks open the novel form to create an entirely new reading experience. Here is a stunning, cinematic tour de force from a boldly innovative storyteller, artist, and bookmaker.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 544 pages, 8.5 × 6 × 2 in

Published: March 1, 2007

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0439813786

ISBN - 13: 9780439813785

Appropriate for ages: 9

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A beautiful story with beautiful illustrations This book was gorgeous! This story is about an orphan, Hugo who lives inside a train station in France. Stealing his way in life because he has no money until the man, Georges Méliès who sells toys in a booth at the train station catches him stealing his toys. Which changes Hugo's life. The ways the characters spoke to each other was aggressive, I don't know if it's how french people actually speak because instead of asking someone to do something it was always a command to do it. Ex. "Can you get me the automata?", in the book it was always, "Get me the automata". Regardless, story was beautiful and the illustrations that went with this story were perfect. The majority of this books is of illustrations that tell the story when it's not in written form. Such an interesting and unique way to put together such a moving story. This story is fictional, it does not actually tell the story of Georges Méliès, only of him being a filmmaker. I would recommend this book to everyone, it's a quick read despite the 534 pages.
Date published: 2014-05-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Play of Written and Visual This was such a fun book to read, so rich with the perfect combination of text and drawings. My eight year old son and I took turns reading this one to each other and we both loved it, were enthralled with the story and had a hard time putting it down. There are pages of text, then pages of drawings, both of which cleverly move the story along. This book has everything: adventure, treachery, friendship, history, betrayal, imagination, and a message. The characters are engaging, especially Hugo. I felt so bad for him and his impossible situation, his grasping at straws to find a connection with his father. Kids will be rooting for him, wanting him to overcome all of the unfair things in his life. He is clever and sharp, as well as innovative and passionate. Isabelle is a good foil for Hugo, a young girl, also smart, but in a different way. The dynamic of their friendship seems real to me, from the way they get along to the way they fight. George Melies is the old man and antagonist of the book,. Although he is mean to Hugo, he is shrouded in mystery, a mystery that the children are eager to solve. The fictional story of Hugo intermingles with historical France of the 1930s and the history of film. This is done well, with the pictures as guides. I loved the mingling of the real history of the film and culture of France with the fictional story of Hugo. The clockwork and automaton part of the plot will really appeal to the imagination and to those who are mechanically inclined or who like steampunk novels. This, combined with the illustrations, is so cool and vivid. And then there is the ever true underlying message of the book - follow your dreams, this is the way to happiness and fulfillment. The Invention of Hugo Cabret is a wonderful, magical book that instantly captures the imagination. Although it looks long and may be intimidating to kids, there are so many pictures, at least half the book (284 pages worth). These are beautiful and well drawn and definitely add to the excitement and drama of the book. This is more than an illustrated book, or a novel with illustrations. Pick it up and you'll see what I mean.
Date published: 2012-03-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from My son loved it! My 9 year old son just finished reading this book and said "this is the best book I've ever read"! Even though it had lots of pictures, the drawings were amazing and he loved the story. Now to see the movie . . .
Date published: 2012-02-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from a story about imagination and perseverance 'The Invention of Hugo Cabret" is a story about a boy who finds himself abandoned and alone but through his imagination and perseverance ends up making a new life for himself. Orphaned after his father dies in a museum fire, Hugo spends his days keeping all the clocks running in a Parisian train station for his uncle who has taken him in. But his uncle too disappears, and Hugo lives on his own and maintains everything on his own. In the meantime, trying to understand why he has lost his father Hugo goes back to the blackened ruins of the museum to retrieve the last project his father was working on. It is an automaton: a mechanical man. Through blind faith that fixing the automaton will lead him to a message from his father, Hugo begins to 'borrow' the mechanical bits from toys he finds in the train station's toy booth. Why these mechanical bits should fit his broken automaton escapes him, but there is a connection which leads Hugo to not only to find friendship, to complete his father's project but to repair a man's broken spirit. The book relies on many drawings to tell the story. These are really well done. The whole book is fantastically well done. (The movie version called Hugo stays fairly close to the novel but the two have many differences too.)
Date published: 2012-01-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Book! The Invention Of Hugo Cabret was a great story. It includes all of the elements of a great book. The author even included beautifully drawn black and white sketches to add some support to the storyline. You should really consider reading this book.
Date published: 2011-12-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Incredible! This is must! for children and everyone who loves reading and illustrations. read it before you see the movie!
Date published: 2011-12-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome couldn't put this book down. I was captivated by the drawings and the text.
Date published: 2011-08-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from cooooooooooool!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! awsome book but not that much words in the book the pics or cool
Date published: 2010-04-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from soo cool this book was the best book i have ever read. i found this book at my library when my frend sugested it. I read if from top to boddem in 2 days i loved it that mutch. the artest who drew the picturs are simpiy the best. they look like my otherr frends drawings. so i got to connest to the book and it is great for young readers because of all the drawings so there mind wont wander. i thout it was abaslutly great, if it had a rading the rading would be 55555555555555555555555555555/ 5
Date published: 2009-09-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Intricate, Intriguing, and Irresistible Although some criticize that there are more drawings than words, those people fail to realize that sometimes, a picture is worth a thousand words. Coming from me, this sounds odd, because I love to read more than look at paintings or sketches. But how can you replace that upward turn in Papa Georges' eyebrow, or the collection of lines dotting the automaton's paper with words? Reading this fantastic piece of work, I saw that it glowed with a quality that comes when something that had been forgotten or ignored for so long has been recollected. (Georges Méliès, automatons) The stunning ideas weaved through this story make it charming and enchanting. The intricate detail in the many pictures define the laborious work Selznick offered his readers. After reading just a bit, you'll be intrigued and join the ride in the spellbinding and irresistible world of Hugo Cabret.
Date published: 2009-01-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hypnotizing This book is fabulous. The combination of written chapters and beautiful hand-drawn illustrations is a unique and wonderful touch. A nice mix of fact and fiction, this book won't take too long to read, but you'll relish in every second of reading it. A must-read!
Date published: 2008-01-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fabulous, Unique and Amazing This is a wonderful book! It is a beautiful, captivating story. I hadn't realized beforehand that it was about a real person involved with the first movies ever made. The time period and the movie history was fascinating, the characters sweet and the story was fast paced. The book itself is also an invention of a new way of reading. Illustrations propel the story along and are used in such a unique way to show the action. Near the end of the book there is a chase scene which is told completely through pages of illustration and it is a brilliantly intense part of the story. I hope others will take the cue from the book and would really like to see more books told in this fascinating new format.
Date published: 2007-12-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing, creative, and truly original Brian Selznick deserves to be commended for his new and creative type of intriguing story. He has created a children's book that will be much revered by the teenage and child community for years to come. It doesn't matter who you are, this richly creative tale will keep you engrossed from beginning to end. Told partly by hand drawn sketches and partly by eloquent text, you will find yourself making your way through this book faster than you can turn the pages! It is original and enticing and hopefully it will someday inspire other writers to follow in Selznick's tracks to tell a magnificent tale by means of talented artistic skill and amazingly rich literacy. Invention Of Hugo Cabret is no doubt the creation of a genius.
Date published: 2006-11-18

– More About This Product –

The Invention of Hugo Cabret

by Brian Selznick
Illustrator Brian Selznick

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 544 pages, 8.5 × 6 × 2 in

Published: March 1, 2007

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0439813786

ISBN - 13: 9780439813785

About the Book

ORPHAN, CLOCK KEEPER, AND THIEF, Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. But when his world suddenly interlocks with an eccentric, bookish girl and a bitter old man who runs a toy booth in the station, Hugo's undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, and a hidden message from Hugo's dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

From the Publisher

Orphan, clock keeper, and thief, Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. But when his world suddenly interlocks — like the gears of the clocks he keeps — with an eccentric, bookish girl and a bitter old man who runs a toy booth in the train station, Hugo''s undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, and a hidden message from Hugo''s dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

With more than three hundred pages of original drawings, and combining elements of picture book, graphic novel, and film, Brian Selznick breaks open the novel form to create an entirely new reading experience. Here is a stunning, cinematic tour de force from a boldly innovative storyteller, artist, and bookmaker.

About the Author

BRIAN SELZNICK is the illustrator of the Caledcott Honor winner, The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins, and the New York Times Best Illustrated Book Walt Whitman: Words for America, both by Barbara Kerley, as well as the Sibert Honor Winner When Marian Sang, by Pam Muñoz Ryan, and numerous other celebrated picture books and novels. Brian has also worked as a set designer and a puppeteer. When he isn''t traveling to research and talk about his work all over the world, he lives in San Diego, California, and Brooklyn, New York.

From the Author

Brian Selznick is the illustrator of the Caledcott Honor winner, The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins, and the New York Times Best Illustrated Book Walt Whitman: Words for America, both by Barbara Kerley, as well as the Sibert Honor Winner When Marian Sang, by Pam Muñoz Ryan, and numerous other celebrated picture books and novels. Brian Selznick lives in Brooklyn, New York and San Diego,California.

Editorial Reviews

Praise for The Invention of Hugo Cabret

2008 Randolph Caldecott Medal
National Book Award Finalist
#1 New York Times Bestseller
USA Today Bestseller
#1 BookSense Bestseller
New York Times Best Illustrated Book of 2007
Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2007
Kirkus Best Book of 2007
New York Public Library Best Book for Reading and Sharing
American Library Association Notable Children''s Book
American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults
2007 Quill Award Winner

* "A true masterpiece." — Publishers Weekly, starred review
* "Fade to black and cue the applause!" — Kirkus Reviews, starred review
* "Complete genius." — The Horn Book Magazine, starred review
* "Breathtaking." — School Library Journal, starred review
* "An original and creative integration of art and text." — The Bulletin of the Center for Children''s Books, starred review
* "It''s wonderful. Take that overused word literally: Hugo Cabret evokes wonder." — New York Times Book Review
* "A fast-paced treat for tweens." — People magazine
* "Captivating." — Los Angeles Times Book Review
* "If your kid loves the J.K. Rowling series, then he''s bound to enjoy The Invention of Hugo Cabret..." — Good Housekeeping magazine

Appropriate for ages: 9

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