The New PR Toolkit: Strategies for Successful Media Relations

by Deirdre K. Breakenridge, Thomas J. Deloughry

Pearson Education | January 30, 2003 | Trade Paperback

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The New PR Toolkitdelivers proven strategies and tactics for using today''s most powerful new online communications tools to strengthen any brand and every stakeholder relationship. Drawing on detailed case studies, the authors offer no-holds-barred assessments and practical guidelines for using e-mail, online newsletters, chat, Web newsrooms, online brand monitoring, and other new tools. Contains a complete blueprint for maximizing the strategic value of communications in your organization.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 272 pages, 8.9 × 5.9 × 0.79 in

Published: January 30, 2003

Publisher: Pearson Education

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0130090255

ISBN - 13: 9780130090256

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– More About This Product –

The New PR Toolkit: Strategies for Successful Media Relations

by Deirdre K. Breakenridge, Thomas J. Deloughry

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 272 pages, 8.9 × 5.9 × 0.79 in

Published: January 30, 2003

Publisher: Pearson Education

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0130090255

ISBN - 13: 9780130090256

Read from the Book

Introduction There''s no denying that the Internet has been one of the most overly hyped technologies in human history. Newspapers, TV shows, magazines, and yes, even a few books promised us a revolutionary new business world in which hard-charging dot-coms stole markets away from established brick-and-mortar companies that were supposedly too stupid and slow moving to realize what was happening around them. All Americans would soon have personal Web pages and spend countless hours in online "communities" swapping advice with like-minded peers. Of course, that''s only if they weren''t running to the front door to accept deliveries of the books, toys, pet food, and sofas they bought online at low, low prices. Anyone who didn''t recognize the magnitude of this Internet revolution and invest a few bucks in skyrocketing Internet stocks just didn''t get it. Today we know that the Internet mania of the late 1990s was as much about greed as it was about innovation. Investors, sold on the notion of a worldwide network of billions of consumers, bet on startups and pushed them to run hard despite poorly formed business plans, faulty technology, and total ignorance about the difficulty of cost-effectively delivering things like groceries or bedroom sets across wide geographic regions. All has not been lost in the dot-com bust, however. The world has embraced this new medium of communication and it is not going to let go. The Internet might not be the megamarket previously advertised, bu
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments. Introduction. I. LAYING THE GROUNDWORK. 1. The 21st-Century Audience. Powerful Tools. Dot-Com Lessons. Know Your Audience. 2. Identifying Audience Trends. A Large Audience. úAnd Growing. What They''re Doing. Online Vets Do More. Broadband Is Coming. Online-Offline Transparency. 3. Knowing What Your Public Wants. Understanding What People Expect of Your Client Online. Factors Affecting Your Online Communications Strategy. Ongoing Research Is Critical. 4. Knowing What the News Media Want. Media Web Sites. Third-Party Resources. MEDIA INTERVIEWS: What the Reporters Say. 5. The Need for Continuous Research. Interview with Michael Bach, CEO and Founder of Survey.com. II. PUTTING THE TOOLS TO WORK. 6. Building Your Online Newsroom. A New World. Imperative #1: A Good Online Pressroom. Imperative #2: Don''t Eliminate Humans. The Flip Side. PR INTERVIEW: IBM''s Matthew Anchin. PR INTERVIEW: Bethlehem Steel''s James D. Courtney. PR INTERVIEW: Air Products'' PR and Graphic Design/Web Teams. JOURNALIST INTERVIEW: Professor Dianne Lynch of St. Michael''s College. 7. Using E-Mail Smartly. How to Use E-Mail Effectively. Principle #1: Ease of Distribution Does Not Necessarily Mean Distribution to the Masses. Principle #2: Quick Communication via E-Mail Does Not Mean Poorly Formulated Messages. Principle #3: There''s No Excuse for Careless Correspondence. Principle #4: As Tedious As It Sounds, E-Mail Communication Deserves Proofreading with the Same Scrutiny As a Snail
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From the Publisher

The New PR Toolkitdelivers proven strategies and tactics for using today''s most powerful new online communications tools to strengthen any brand and every stakeholder relationship. Drawing on detailed case studies, the authors offer no-holds-barred assessments and practical guidelines for using e-mail, online newsletters, chat, Web newsrooms, online brand monitoring, and other new tools. Contains a complete blueprint for maximizing the strategic value of communications in your organization.

From the Jacket

The New PR Toolkitdelivers proven strategies and tactics for using today''s most powerful new online communications tools to strengthen any brand and every stakeholder relationship. Drawing on detailed case studies, the authors offer no-holds-barred assessments and practical guidelines for using e-mail, online newsletters, chat, Web newsrooms, online brand monitoring, and other new tools. Contains a complete blueprint for maximizing the strategic value of communications in your organization.

About the Author

Deirdre Breakenridge is an author, entrepreneur and CEO of Pure Performance Communications. A 20 + year veteran in PR and marketing, she is the author of five FT Press books including her latest titles,Social Media and Public Relations: Eight New Practices for the PR Professional,Putting the Public Back in Public Relations, andPR 2.0: New Media, New Tools, New Audiences.

Deirdre speaks both nationally and internationally on the topics of PR, social media and marketing. She is a recognized PR blogger at PR 2.0 strategies, and also the co-founder of#PRStudChat, a dynamic twitter chat with PR professionals, educators and students.

 

THOMAS J. DeLOUGHRY is a freelance writer with more than 15 years of experience in journalism. He is a former Executive Editor ofInternet Worldmagazine, where he had a front-row seat for the dot-com craze. He began writing about information technology forThe Chronicle of Higher Education, a Washington, D.C.-based weekly, in 1987 when the Internet was primarily the domain of professors and researchers. He''s also been a Contributing Editor toInternetWeekmagazine and has written for several other magazines and newspapers.

From the Author

Introduction There’s no denying that the Internet has been one of the most overly hyped technologies in human history. Newspapers, TV shows, magazines, and yes, even a few books promised us a revolutionary new business world in which hardcharging dotcoms stole markets away from established brickandmortar companies that were supposedly too stupid and slow moving to realize what was happening around them. All Americans would soon have personal Web pages and spend countless hours in online "communities" swapping advice with likeminded peers. Of course, that’s only if they weren’t running to the front door to accept deliveries of the books, toys, pet food, and sofas they bought online at low, low prices. Anyone who didn’t recognize the magnitude of this Internet revolution and invest a few bucks in skyrocketing Internet stocks just didn’t get it. Today we know that the Internet mania of the late 1990s was as much about greed as it was about innovation. Investors, sold on the notion of a worldwide network of billions of consumers, bet on startups and pushed them to run hard despite poorly formed business plans, faulty technology, and total ignorance about the difficulty of costeffectively delivering things like groceries or bedroom sets across wide geographic regions. All has not been lost in the dotcom bust, however. The world has embraced this new medium of communication and it is not going to let go. The Internet might not be the megamarket previously advertised, but it has ver
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