The New Schaff-Herzog encyclopedia of religious knowledge Volume 1; embracing biblical, historical…

by Samuel Macauley Jackson

General Books LLC | May 14, 2012 | Trade Paperback

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 Excerpt: ...of Cresarius of Aries (d. 542; Pseudo-Augustine, 244; cf. Kattenbusch, i. 164 sqq.), with which may be compared Sermo, 240, 241 (texts in Hahn, §§47-49), and the symbol in the Missale Gallicanum vetus (Hahn, 3. Earliest § 36). The immediate predecessor Appear-of Cajsarius'' and, consequently, of ance. our "apostles'' creed" is most likely the symbol of Faustus of Riez of about 460 (Hahn, § 38; Kattenbusch, pp. 158 sqq.), but its reconstruction is difficult. On the other hand, the stage succeeding that of the old Roman symbol (see below) in the direction of our Apostolicum is represented by the highly interesting symbol discovered by Bratke in the Bern Codex n. 645 sajc. vii. (SK, lxviii., 1895,153 sqq.), which is to be regarded as a Gallican, or rather GallicoBritish, symbol belonging to the fourth century. It differs from the ancient Roman symbol only by the additions of passus, descendit ad inferos, catholicam, and vilam ceternam. These four additions all tend in the direction of our Apostolicum and at the same time prove that they are the four older additions, while conceptus, etc., and communionem sanctorum are the later ones (but crealorem cadi et terra; and mortuus are also older). Two considerations are against a Roman origin of the Apostolicum: (1) It is not found in Rome until the Middle Ages, i.e., many centuries after its attestation by Ctesarius of Aries; (2) From the end of the fifth, or the beginning of the sixth century until the tenth the Nicajnc-Constantinopolitan creed in Greek was used in Rome in the traditio symboli, and not the Apostolicum (Caspari, iii. 201202, 226; ii. 114-115, note 88); a shorter symbol was also in use in Rome (see below), but it was not identical with the Apostolicum. With the spread of the textus ...

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 552 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 1.12 in

Published: May 14, 2012

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1153635127

ISBN - 13: 9781153635127

Found in: Fiction

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– More About This Product –

The New Schaff-Herzog encyclopedia of religious knowledge Volume 1; embracing biblical, historical…

by Samuel Macauley Jackson

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 552 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 1.12 in

Published: May 14, 2012

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1153635127

ISBN - 13: 9781153635127

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 Excerpt: ...of Cresarius of Aries (d. 542; Pseudo-Augustine, 244; cf. Kattenbusch, i. 164 sqq.), with which may be compared Sermo, 240, 241 (texts in Hahn, §§47-49), and the symbol in the Missale Gallicanum vetus (Hahn, 3. Earliest § 36). The immediate predecessor Appear-of Cajsarius'' and, consequently, of ance. our "apostles'' creed" is most likely the symbol of Faustus of Riez of about 460 (Hahn, § 38; Kattenbusch, pp. 158 sqq.), but its reconstruction is difficult. On the other hand, the stage succeeding that of the old Roman symbol (see below) in the direction of our Apostolicum is represented by the highly interesting symbol discovered by Bratke in the Bern Codex n. 645 sajc. vii. (SK, lxviii., 1895,153 sqq.), which is to be regarded as a Gallican, or rather GallicoBritish, symbol belonging to the fourth century. It differs from the ancient Roman symbol only by the additions of passus, descendit ad inferos, catholicam, and vilam ceternam. These four additions all tend in the direction of our Apostolicum and at the same time prove that they are the four older additions, while conceptus, etc., and communionem sanctorum are the later ones (but crealorem cadi et terra; and mortuus are also older). Two considerations are against a Roman origin of the Apostolicum: (1) It is not found in Rome until the Middle Ages, i.e., many centuries after its attestation by Ctesarius of Aries; (2) From the end of the fifth, or the beginning of the sixth century until the tenth the Nicajnc-Constantinopolitan creed in Greek was used in Rome in the traditio symboli, and not the Apostolicum (Caspari, iii. 201202, 226; ii. 114-115, note 88); a shorter symbol was also in use in Rome (see below), but it was not identical with the Apostolicum. With the spread of the textus ...
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