The Slow Regard Of Silent Things

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The Slow Regard Of Silent Things

by Patrick Rothfuss

Daw | October 28, 2014 | Hardcover

The Slow Regard Of Silent Things is rated 5 out of 5 by 3.
Patrick Rothfuss was born in Madison, Wisconsin on June 6, 1973. He received a B.A. in English from the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point and M. A. from Washington State University. He teaches at the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point. In 2002, his short story, The Road to Levinshir, won first place in the Writers of the Future contest. He writes The Kingkiller Chronicles. The first book in the series, The Name of the Wind, won the 2007 Quill Award for best sci-fi/fantasy. The third book in the series, The Slow Regard of Silent Things, made the New York Times bestseller list in 2014.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 176 pages, 8.25 × 5.45 × 0.6 in

Published: October 28, 2014

Publisher: Daw

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0756410436

ISBN - 13: 9780756410438

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful "Well, after that she would do her best. That was the only way. You did not want things for yourself. That made you small. That kept you safe. That meant you could move smoothly through the world without upsetting every applecart you came across. And if you were careful, if you were a proper part of things, then you could help. You mended what was cracked. You tended to the things you found askew. And you trusted that the world in turn would brush you up against the chance to eat. It was the only graceful way to move. All else was vanity and pride." Last week I read some of the initial reviews on Goodreads and they were varied. On one hand, you have the people who didn't like it. Who begrudge Mr. Rothfuss for writing it. I assume (probably wrongly, but it's my assumption so I'll take the risk) that these are people who have never really felt lonely. Lost. Not proper true. Oh, they've been through some tough circumstances, but to know what it is to be truly forlorn is foreign to them. The "Ambroses" of the world. They're not necessarily bad people. They just don't know the feeling of being "the only one that tended to the proper turning of the world." On the other hand, us. Those who have walked through the valley of isolation, abandonment, neglect, etc, and still have the dust of it on our face, our hands, our feet. Those who understand what it is to feel that things aren't quite as they should be and who try to mend the little incongruences. I found a part of myself in Auri even before "The Slow Regard of Silent Things", but this glimpse into her day to day world really solidified it. And I loved her all the more for it. She just resonates with me in so many ways. Her story is pitiful and beautiful and raw, full of soaring hope and gut-wrenching despair. Some of my favourite moments were the most quiet and sweet. When she finished her soap (especially the little poem: "She went to Clinks. She washed herself. She brushed her hair. She laughed and leapt. She hurried home. She went to bed. And all alone, she smiled and slept."), I shared her delight. Her panic attack broke my heart ("She knew. She knew how quickly things could break. You did the things you could. You tended the world for the world's sake. You hoped you would be safe. But still she knew. It could come crashing down and there was nothing you could do."). This woman who takes care of the entire Underthing, and yet doesn't remember to eat. This woman who finds such joy in the simplest of things and has the freedom to express all her joy and pain and triumph and fear without shame. This woman, so fragile and so strong. I envy her. I empathize with her. "The Name of the Wind" and "Wise Man's Fear" are books of the face, the hands, the feet. Auri's story is one of the heart, the mind, the soul. I echo Vi Hart's sentiments: Mr. Rothfuss made me feel more empathy for Auri's inanimate companions than a lot of authors make me feel about their main characters. I would say of Auri what she said of the gear: "Poor thing. To be so lovely and so lost. To be all answerful with all that knowing trapped inside. To be beautiful and broken." And now, a note to Mr. Rothfuss. First of all, thank you. Thank you for having the courage to write this, to show Vi Hart, to show your other trusted friends, and to allow them to publish this sublime tome. You knew people were going to be pissed, and you did it anyway. But as Vi so wisely said, "Those people have stories written for them all the time. What about me? Where's the story for people like me?" Second of all, the people who were disappointed, angry, apathetic - it is their fault that they missed the quiet, resplendent elegance. Thirdly, there are people who begrudge you for writing this with Doors of Stone still unpublished. I disagree vehemently with them. I think you should write exactly what you'd like to write, and you should take exactly as long as you'd like to do so. As you said in the afterword, you grew your craft through writing Auri's story, and I love that you are still looking to improve and be challenged. I hope above all things that you don't feel the weight of everyone's expectations over much and that you allow yourself the freedom to continue to stretch yourself. To live. To breathe. You owe yourself that. And after all you've given to us, your readers, we owe it to you as well.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Vulnerability in Book Form "Well, after that she would do her best. That was the only way. You did not want things for yourself. That made you small. That kept you safe. That meant you could move smoothly through the world without upsetting every applecart you came across. And if you were careful, if you were a proper part of things, then you could help. You mended what was cracked. You tended to the things you found askew. And you trusted that the world in turn would brush you up against the chance to eat. It was the only graceful way to move. All else was vanity and pride." Last week I read some of the initial reviews on Goodreads and they were varied. On one hand, you have the people who didn't like it. Who begrudge Mr. Rothfuss for writing it. I assume (probably wrongly, but it's my assumption so I'll take the risk) that these are people who have never really felt lonely. Lost. Not proper true. Oh, they've been through some tough circumstances, but to know what it is to be truly forlorn is foreign to them. The "Ambroses" of the world. They're not necessarily bad people. They just don't know the feeling of being "the only one that tended to the proper turning of the world." On the other hand, us. Those who have walked through the valley of isolation, abandonment, neglect, etc, and still have the dust of it on our face, our hands, our feet. Those who understand what it is to feel that things aren't quite as they should be and who try to mend the little incongruences. I found a part of myself in Auri even before "The Slow Regard of Silent Things", but this glimpse into her day to day world really solidified it. And I loved her all the more for it. She just resonates with me in so many ways. Her story is pitiful and beautiful and raw, full of soaring hope and gut-wrenching despair. Some of my favourite moments were the most quiet and sweet. When she finished her soap (especially the little poem: "She went to Clinks. She washed herself. She brushed her hair. She laughed and leapt. She hurried home. She went to bed. And all alone, she smiled and slept."), I shared her delight. Her panic attack broke my heart ("She knew. She knew how quickly things could break. You did the things you could. You tended the world for the world's sake. You hoped you would be safe. But still she knew. It could come crashing down and there was nothing you could do."). This woman who takes care of the entire Underthing, and yet doesn't remember to eat. This woman who finds such joy in the simplest of things and has the freedom to express all her joy and pain and triumph and fear without shame. This woman, so fragile and so strong. I envy her. I empathize with her. "The Name of the Wind" and "Wise Man's Fear" are books of the face, the hands, the feet. Auri's story is one of the heart, the mind, the soul. I echo Vi Hart's sentiments: Mr. Rothfuss made me feel more empathy for Auri's inanimate companions than a lot of authors make me feel about their main characters. I would say of Auri what she said of the gear: "Poor thing. To be so lovely and so lost. To be all answerful with all that knowing trapped inside. To be beautiful and broken." And now, a note to Mr. Rothfuss. First of all, thank you. Thank you for having the courage to write this, to show Vi Hart, to show your other trusted friends, and to allow them to publish this sublime tome. You knew people were going to be pissed, and you did it anyway. But as Vi so wisely said, "Those people have stories written for them all the time. What about me? Where's the story for people like me?" Second of all, the people who were disappointed, angry, apathetic - it is their fault that they missed the quiet, resplendent elegance. Thirdly, there are people who begrudge you for writing this with Doors of Stone still unpublished. I disagree vehemently with them. I think you should write exactly what you'd like to write, and you should take exactly as long as you'd like to do so. As you said in the afterword, you grew your craft through writing Auri's story, and I love that you are still looking to improve and be challenged. I hope above all things that you don't feel the weight of everyone's expectations over much and that you allow yourself the freedom to continue to stretch yourself. To live. To breathe. You owe yourself that. And after all you've given to us, your readers, we owe it to you as well.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A nice addition to the series I wouldn't classify this as a story, more of a novella. A well-thought through addition to the series. If you have read the first two novels of the King-killer Chronicles, which i would consider a pre-requisite to this book, then you will immediately understand why it's is written a certain way. If you are looking for a continuation of Kvothes story-line, you wont find it hear. But you will find a great story that a nice abridgment to the (hopefully) soon to be released last book in the series. Definite recommend.
Date published: 2014-10-22

– More About This Product –

The Slow Regard Of Silent Things

by Patrick Rothfuss

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 176 pages, 8.25 × 5.45 × 0.6 in

Published: October 28, 2014

Publisher: Daw

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0756410436

ISBN - 13: 9780756410438

About the Author

Patrick Rothfuss was born in Madison, Wisconsin on June 6, 1973. He received a B.A. in English from the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point and M. A. from Washington State University. He teaches at the University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point. In 2002, his short story, The Road to Levinshir, won first place in the Writers of the Future contest. He writes The Kingkiller Chronicles. The first book in the series, The Name of the Wind, won the 2007 Quill Award for best sci-fi/fantasy. The third book in the series, The Slow Regard of Silent Things, made the New York Times bestseller list in 2014.
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