The Sun Also Rises

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The Sun Also Rises

by Ernest Hemingway
Read by William Hurt

Simon & Schuster Audio | October 17, 2006 | Audio Book (CD)

The Sun Also Rises is rated 3.4444 out of 5 by 9.
THE QUINTESSENTIAL NARRATIVE OF THE LOST GENERATION

The Sun Also Rises is one of Ernest Hemingway''s masterpieces and a classic example of his spare but powerful style. A poignant look at the disillusionment and angst of the post-World War I generation, the story introduces two of Hemingway''s most unforgettable characters: Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley. Follow the flamboyant Brett and the hapless Jake as they journey from the wild nightlife of 1920s Paris to the brutal bullfighting rings of Spain with a motley group of expatriates. It is an age of moral bankruptcy, spiritual dissolution, unrealized love and vanishing illusions. First published in 1926, The Sun Also Rises helped to establish Hemingway as one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century.

Format: Audio Book (CD)

Dimensions: 5.88 × 5 × 1.2 in

Published: October 17, 2006

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0743564413

ISBN - 13: 9780743564410

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Relatable, and a Great Ending! I loved this book. Hemingway approaches an interesting story of a group of people going from Paris to a bull-fighting fiesta in Spain, from the first person. This makes the story seem true, and like you're right there with the characters. He also writes practically, taking you through every day, every meal, and commenting on the little things going on around him. I thought this really brought the story to life. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is because it did move a little slow. It took me a while to finish the book. However, the ending is perfect and elegant. He really couldn't have done it better!
Date published: 2014-01-30
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Disappointing Rarely have I read a book and had nothing positive to say about it. All of the characters were detestable, the plot was non-existent and the writing left me annoyed (especially the dialogues). I like to read the classics, but I will not add Hemingway to my author list. The book was short, I guess that was positive.
Date published: 2009-09-14
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Hemingway Overrated I don't think Hemingway is quite my cup of tea. I love reading all genres, but this novel left me cold. I found the eternal drunkenness in Paris very dull, all of the characters were unlikable, and the dialogue painful was to read.
Date published: 2009-02-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from In short, a story on the effects of war and its castrating abilities. The Sun Also Rises at first appears to be a story based upon Robert Cohn, a shy and awkward ex-boxer, who is insecure, yet disciplined in his struggle to rise up and out of the shadows. Quickly we realize that Cohn is little more than a weak and tormented scapegoat for the narrator and the other expatriates of the novel to debase and mock, all in efforts to ignore their own self-loathing and disgruntled lives. Cohn, a self-conscious writer lacking any true connection with others, whilst shouldering emasculating abuse from women as a constant, is a clear and vicious reminder of all of the traits that Jake Barnes, our narrator, despises about himself. Since the feminizing war, Jake is not unlike many other men who had returned from combat broken and lost, choosing to pay no mind to their servitude and how it had changed them. Theirs is a life impaired by an arrested development, devoid of any meaning, direction or significance. They stay numb with drink and forever search for the next form of entertainment to keep their minds occupied. Some trivial, like getting ‘tight’ at the bars, some poetic, like the destructive and metaphorical bull-fights. At the contrast of the weak men, we are presented with few women in The Sun Also Rises, all of which are strong, dominating and controlling, and, frankly, come off as bitchy whores. Lady Ashley, our femme fatale, is quite possibly the most tragic and damaged of all the flawed personalities we encounter. It is interesting to note that although she was not part of the war, she did lose her true love to it, leaving her part of the lost generation indirectly, as a consequence. Although you would be hard pressed to find any very likeable men or women in this cast of characters, I did finish the novel with an aftertaste of misogyny in my mouth, and I’m interested to see what the female roles of Hemingway’s other works amount to. Hemingway’s clean and precise writing style, lacks in rhetoric or pretentiousness, yet this is not meant to imply that his work is simple or commonplace, as The Sun Also Rises is like a pungent onion, that you slowly peal-back layer by layer, always respectfully aware of its strength and savouring its dissolve. www.booksnakereviews.blogspot.com
Date published: 2009-02-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Achingly Beautiful I've read this book every year since 1991, and it is never the same book. Like so many things in this world, The Sun Also Rises improves with age and attention. Some readings I find myself in love with Lady Brett Ashley. Then I am firmly in Jake Barnes' camp, feeling his pain and wondering how he stays sane with all that happens around him. Another time I can't help but feel that Robert Cohn is getting a sh***y deal and find his behavior not only understandable but restrained. Or I am with Mike and Bill and Romero on the periphery where the hurricane made by Brett and Jake and Robert destroys spirits or fun or nothing (which is decidedly something). And then I am against them all as though they were my sworn enemies or my family. No matter what I feel while reading The Sun Also Rises, it is Hemingway's richest novel for me. I feel it was written for me. And sometimes feel it was written by me (I surely wish it was). Hemingway's language, his characterizations, his love for all the people he writes about (no matter how unsavory they may be), his love of women and men, his empathy with the pain people feel in life and love, his touch with locale, his integration of sport as metaphor and setting, his getting everything just right with nothing out of place and nothing superfluous, all of this makes The Sun Also Rises his most important novel. It is the Hemingway short story writ large. It is the book he should be remembered for but isn't. I often wonder why that is, and the conclusion I come to is this: The Sun Also Rises is too real, too true, too painful for the average reader to stomach. And many who can are predisposed to hate Hemingway. A terrible shame that so many miss something so achingly beautiful.
Date published: 2008-10-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Just go to the fight with me: a review of Ernest Hemigway's The Sun Also Rises I began reading Hemingway a bit more seriously because of Palahniuk’s comment that Hemingway was one of his favourite authors. Currently I’m researching the source material used to create the novel Fight Club. THE SUN ALSO RISES was the first book I picked up. “You are a lost generation” (Gertrude Stein) is printed on the inside cover. That’s exactly it. Hemingway is brilliant because he captures something about a generation of men who experienced themselves as lost. This may not be historically accurate, but it is an accurate description of Hemingway’s writing, which is no doubt brilliant. When I first read the infamous description of bullfighting in Spain I wasn’t particularly impressed. It was a year ago that I read the novel and I still have a vivid memory of how it was described… so despite my immediate inclination this is a novel whose imagery and power will really stay with you. What will attract you to Hemingway is the rawness of the emotion and the simplicity of expression in which feelings and context is conveyed. It is difficult to really go back and enjoy something you learned about in high school... but Hemingway is worth it. + + + “Some one rapped on the cage with an iron bar. Inside something seemed to explode.” (143) “You gave up something and got something else. Or you worked for something. You paid some way for everything that was any good. I paid my way into enough things that I liked, so I had a good time. Either you paid by learning about them, or by experience, or by taking chances, or by money. Enjoying living was learning to get your money’s worth and knowing when you had it. You could get your money’s worth. The world was a good place to buy in. It seemed like a fine philosophy. In five years, I thought, it will seem just as silly as all the other fine philosophies I’ve had.” (152)
Date published: 2008-01-09
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Dated? A Relic? I was looking forward to reading this. (I have fond memories of Pamploma from 1963.) I had just finished A Moveable Feast and was interested in the spare style of Papa, but this book, despite all the fame it has, did little for me. I can accept his spare style, but nobody talks the way Hemingway writes, except the characters in his book. I think the interest of this book lies in its value as a literary artifact - but I doubt that anyone would publish it today (if it were written by an unknown author at any rate). The characters are not well drawn and I have little interest in them - eating and drinking all day may have had value for the lost generation , but those days are long gone (thank goodness). My father (born 1917) was a huge Hemingway fan, his son is not.
Date published: 2005-12-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Classic Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises is a classic in every sense of the word. His writing is crisp and clean and leaves the reader asking for more! If you have ever read anything by Papa - I'm sure this one will be one of your Favorites! READ IT!
Date published: 1999-07-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Bow To Papa We all must bow to Papa.
Date published: 1999-05-31

– More About This Product –

The Sun Also Rises

by Ernest Hemingway
Read by William Hurt

Format: Audio Book (CD)

Dimensions: 5.88 × 5 × 1.2 in

Published: October 17, 2006

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0743564413

ISBN - 13: 9780743564410

Read from the Book

Chapter One Robert Cohn was once middleweight boxing champion of Princeton. Do not think that I am very much impressed by that as a boxing title, but it meant a lot to Cohn. He cared nothing for boxing, in fact he disliked it, but he learned it painfully and thoroughly to counteract the feeling of inferiority and shyness he had felt on being treated as a Jew at Princeton. There was a certain inner comfort in knowing he could knock down anybody who was snooty to him, although, being very shy and a thoroughly nice boy, he never fought except in the gym. He was Spider Kelly''s star pupil. Spider Kelly taught all his young gentlemen to box like featherweights, no matter whether they weighed one hundred and five or two hundred and five pounds. But it seemed to fit Cohn. He was really very fast. He was so good that Spider promptly overmatched him and got his nose permanently flattened. This increased Cohn''s distaste for boxing, but it gave him a certain satisfaction of some strange sort, and it certainly improved his nose. In his last year at Princeton he read too much and took to wearing spectacles. I never met any one of his class who remembered him. They did not even remember that he was middleweight boxing champion. I mistrust all frank and simple people, especially when their stories hold together, and I always had a suspicion that perhaps Robert Cohn had never been middleweight boxing champion, and that perhaps a horse had stepped on his face, or that maybe his mother had be
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From the Publisher

THE QUINTESSENTIAL NARRATIVE OF THE LOST GENERATION

The Sun Also Rises is one of Ernest Hemingway''s masterpieces and a classic example of his spare but powerful style. A poignant look at the disillusionment and angst of the post-World War I generation, the story introduces two of Hemingway''s most unforgettable characters: Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley. Follow the flamboyant Brett and the hapless Jake as they journey from the wild nightlife of 1920s Paris to the brutal bullfighting rings of Spain with a motley group of expatriates. It is an age of moral bankruptcy, spiritual dissolution, unrealized love and vanishing illusions. First published in 1926, The Sun Also Rises helped to establish Hemingway as one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century.

About the Author

Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in the family home in Oak Park, Ill., on July 21, 1899. In high school, Hemingway enjoyed working on The Trapeze, his school newspaper, where he wrote his first articles. Upon graduation in the spring of 1917, Hemingway took a job as a cub reporter for the Kansas City Star. After a short stint in the U.S. Army as a volunteer Red Cross ambulance driver in Italy, Hemingway moved to Paris, and it was here that Hemingway began his well-documented career as a novelist. Hemingway's first collection of short stories and vignettes, entitled In Our Time, was published in 1925. His first major novel, The Sun Also Rises, the story of American and English expatriates in Paris and on excursion to Pamplona, immediately established him as one of the great prose stylists and preeminent writers of his time. In this book, Hemingway quotes Gertrude Stein, "You are all a lost generation," thereby labeling himself and other expatriate writers, including Scott Fitzgerald, T.S. Eliot, and Ford Madox Ford. Other novels written by Hemingway include: A Farewell To Arms, the story, based in part on Hemingway's life, of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse; For Whom the Bell Tolls, the story of an American who fought, loved, and died with the guerrillas in the mountains of Spain; and To Have and Have Not, about an honest man forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West. Non-fiction includes Green Hill
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Editorial Reviews

"An absorbing, beautifully and tenderly absurd, heart-breaking narrative...It is a truly gripping story, told in lean, hard athletic prose...magnificent."

-- The New York Times

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