The Trojan Women and Hippolytus

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The Trojan Women and Hippolytus

by Euripides

Dover Publications | July 17, 2002 | Trade Paperback |

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Played out against the ruined walls of Troy, The Trojan Women serves as one of the most powerful indictments of war ever written, recounting the murder of the innocent, the desecration of shrines, and the enslavement of Trojan women. Hippolytus depicts the struggles to master human passion, struggles symbolized by gods who behave like irresponsible humans.

Format: Trade Paperback

Published: July 17, 2002

Publisher: Dover Publications

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0486424626

ISBN - 13: 9780486424620

Appropriate for ages: 14

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– More About This Product –

The Trojan Women and Hippolytus

by Euripides

Format: Trade Paperback

Published: July 17, 2002

Publisher: Dover Publications

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0486424626

ISBN - 13: 9780486424620

From the Publisher

Played out against the ruined walls of Troy, The Trojan Women serves as one of the most powerful indictments of war ever written, recounting the murder of the innocent, the desecration of shrines, and the enslavement of Trojan women. Hippolytus depicts the struggles to master human passion, struggles symbolized by gods who behave like irresponsible humans.

About the Author

Euripides, one of the three great Greek tragedians was born in Attica probably in 485 B.C. of well-to-do parents. In his youth he cultivated gymnastic pursuits and studied philosophy and rhetoric. Soon after he received recognition for a play that he had written, Euripides left Athens for the court of Archelaus, king of Macedonia. In his tragedies, Euripides represented individuals not as they ought to be but as they are. His excellence lies in the tenderness and pathos with which he invested many of his characters. Euripides' attitude toward the gods was iconoclastic and rationalistic; toward humans-notably his passionate female characters-his attitude was deeply sympathetic. In his dramas, Euripides separated the chorus from the action, which was the first step toward the complete elimination of the chorus. He used the prologue as an introduction and explanation. Although Euripides has been charged with intemperate use of the deus ex machina, by which artifice a god is dragged in abruptly at the end to resolve a situation beyond human powers, he created some of the most unforgettable psychological portraits. Fragments of about fifty-five plays survive; some were discovered as recently as 1906. Among his best-known plays are Alcestis (438 B.C.), Medea and Philoctetes (431 B.C.), Electra (417 B.C.), Iphigenia in Tauris (.413 B.C.), The Trojan Women (415 B.C.), and Iphigenia in Aulis Iphigenia (c.405 B.C.). Euripides died in Athens in 406. Shortly after his death his reputatio
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Appropriate for ages: 14

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