The Virtue Of Selfishness: Fiftieth Anniversary Edition

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The Virtue Of Selfishness: Fiftieth Anniversary Edition

by Ayn Rand

Signet | August 5, 2014 | Mass Market Paperbound |

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Ayn Rand here sets forth the moral principles of Objectivism, the philosophy that holds human life--the life proper to a rational being--as the standard of moral values and regards altruism as incompatible with man''s nature, with the creative requirements of his survival, and with a free society.

More than 1.3 million copies sold!

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 176 Pages, 3.94 × 6.69 × 0.39 in

Published: August 5, 2014

Publisher: Signet

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0451163931

ISBN - 13: 9780451163936

Found in: Economics, Religion and Spirituality
Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18

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– More About This Product –

The Virtue Of Selfishness: Fiftieth Anniversary Edition

The Virtue Of Selfishness: Fiftieth Anniversary Edition

by Ayn Rand

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 176 Pages, 3.94 × 6.69 × 0.39 in

Published: August 5, 2014

Publisher: Signet

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0451163931

ISBN - 13: 9780451163936

Table of Contents

Introduction
1. The Objectivist Ethics, Ayn Rand (1961)
2. Mental Health versus Mysticism and Self-Sacrifice, Nathaniel Branden (1963)
3. The Ethics of Emergencies, Ayn Rand (1963)
4. The "Conflicts" of Men''s Interests, Ayn Rand (1962)
5. Isn''t Everyone Selfish?, Nathaniel Branden (1962)
6. The Psychology of Pleasure, Nathaniel Branden (1964)
7. Doesn''t Life Require Compromise?, Ayn Rand (1962)
8. How Does One Lead a Rational Life in an Irrational Society?, Ayn Rand (1962)
9. The Cult of Moral Grayness, Ayn Rand (1964)
10. Collectivized Ethics, Ayn Rand (1963)
11. The Monument Builders, Ayn Rand (1962)
12. Man''s Rights, Ayn Rand (1963)
13. Collectivized "Rights", Ayn Rand (1963)
14. The Nature of Government, Ayn Rand (1963)
15. Government Financing in a Free Society, Ayn Rand (1964)
16. The Divine Right of Stagnation, Nathaniel Branden (1963)
17. Racism, Ayn Rand (1963)
18. Counterfeit Individualism, Nathaniel Branden (1962)
19. The Argument from Intimidation, Ayn Rand (1964)
Index

From the Publisher

Ayn Rand here sets forth the moral principles of Objectivism, the philosophy that holds human life--the life proper to a rational being--as the standard of moral values and regards altruism as incompatible with man''s nature, with the creative requirements of his survival, and with a free society.

More than 1.3 million copies sold!

About the Author

Ayn Rand was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, on February 2, 1905. At age six she taught herself to read and two years later discovered her first fictional hero in a French magazine for children, thus capturing the heroic vision that sustained her throughout her life. At the age of nine she decided to make fiction writing her career. Thoroughly opposed to the mysticism and collectivism of Russian culture, she thought of herself as a European writer, especially after encountering Victor Hugo, the writer she most admired. During her high school years, she was eyewitness to both the Kerensky Revolution, which she supported, and—in 1917—the Bolshevik Revolution, which she denounced from the outset. In order to escape the fighting, her family went to the Crimea, where she finished high school. The final Communist victory brought the confiscation of her father''s pharmacy and periods of near-starvation. When introduced to American history in her last year of high school, she immediately took America as her model of what a nation of free people could be. When her family returned from the Crimea, she entered the University of Petrograd to study philosophy and history. Graduating in 1924, she experienced the disintegration of free inquiry and the takeover of the university by communist thugs. Amidst the increasingly gray life, her one great pleasure was Western films and plays. Long an admirer of cinema, she entered the State Institute for Cinema Arts in 1924 to study screenw
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Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18

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