The War Of The Worlds

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The War Of The Worlds

by H. G. Wells

Ulverscroft Large Print | December 31, 2005 | Audio Book (CD)

The War Of The Worlds is rated 3.6667 out of 5 by 6.
H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, England, the son of an unsuccessful merchant. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a dry-goods merchant, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology under the British biologist and educator, Thomas Henry Huxley. After graduating, Wells took several different teaching positions and began writing for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. Wells's first major novel, The Time Machine (1895), launched his career as a writer, and he began to produce a steady stream of science-fiction tales, short stories, realistic novels, and books of sociology, history, science, and biography, producing one or more books a year. Much of Wells's work is forward-looking, peering into the future of prophesy social and scientific developments, sometimes with amazing accuracy. Along with French writer Jules Verne, Wells is credited with popularizing science fiction, and such novels as The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds (1898) are still widely read. Many of Wells's stories are based on his own experiences. The History of Mr. Polly (1910) draws on the life of Wells's father. Kipps (1905) uses Wells's experience as an apprentice, and Love and Mr. Lewisham (1900) draws on Wells's experiences as a school teacher. Wells also wrote stories showing how the world could be a better place. One such story is A Modern Utopia (1905). As a writer, Wells's range was exceptionally wide and his imagination extremely fertile. While time may have caught up with him (many of the things he predicted have already come to pass), he remains an interesting writer because of his ability to tell a lively tale.

Format: Audio Book (CD)

Dimensions: 7.7 × 7.52 × 1.66 in

Published: December 31, 2005

Publisher: Ulverscroft Large Print

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 075312470X

ISBN - 13: 9780753124703

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Arguably his best book, H.G. Wells has portrayed and painted a vivid image in reader's minds what an invasion from Mars would be like. This book is a must for lovers of science fiction classics. I believe that this book will linger in peoples dreams as it has on mine. The only fault H.G. Wells made in this book was make the triumphant victory of mankind too abrupt. On one page the Martians have destroyed London, and the next they are all dead from bacteria. Although this little abruptness in the story in which i find slightly disturbing, I recommend strongly this book to everyone.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Repetitive and boring How could any writer take a subject as potentially thrilling as an invasion from Mars and turn it into such tedious and dull blather? He repeats the same descriptions over and over until you can't wait for it to end. This is one of the few instances in which the movie far outdoes the book.
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great sci-fi classic! It even made it to the big screen! A great sci-fi by H.G. Wells (The Invisible man, The Time Machine) it's exciting and interesting. For the age that this book was written, you can tell Wells had a huge imagination. It even brought America in panic when it was cited over a radio station. Now that's what I call a good book!
Date published: 2013-10-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Sci-fi throwback This earliest of sci-fi novels is a classic precursor to alien invasion stories, on paper or on film. I’m not too into science-fiction, but I have read Harry Turtledove’s World War series as I’m more of a military history buff. If you enjoy War of the Worlds or even if you find it a little antiquated for your tastes, you should definitely check out Turtledove’s work as he takes the theme to a whole new level. Having been written almost a century ago, this novel reads very well and the actual writing does not appear dated. (No “thee’s” and “thou’s” a la Shakespeare). Perhaps an interesting novel for younger readers, but they may scoff at the antiquated notion of Martian invaders, death rays, and the like. These have now become cliché, but have their origins with this book. The story is interesting and well written. I have not seen the recent movie, but rest assured it is not like the book, which is set in late 19th century England. An easier and lighter read than many other classics in English literature, I’m glad to have picked it up and would recommend it to readers of all ages.
Date published: 2013-10-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Pretty good altough the general story presented was fairly good i found it a difficult read and found that it dregged on and on with details
Date published: 2013-10-25
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Scarily Creepily Wonderful! «H.G. Wells» Is an amazing writer, and with War Of The Worlds, his writing continues to amaze readers!
Date published: 2013-10-29

– More About This Product –

The War Of The Worlds

by H. G. Wells

Format: Audio Book (CD)

Dimensions: 7.7 × 7.52 × 1.66 in

Published: December 31, 2005

Publisher: Ulverscroft Large Print

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 075312470X

ISBN - 13: 9780753124703

About the Author

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, England, the son of an unsuccessful merchant. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a dry-goods merchant, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology under the British biologist and educator, Thomas Henry Huxley. After graduating, Wells took several different teaching positions and began writing for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. Wells's first major novel, The Time Machine (1895), launched his career as a writer, and he began to produce a steady stream of science-fiction tales, short stories, realistic novels, and books of sociology, history, science, and biography, producing one or more books a year. Much of Wells's work is forward-looking, peering into the future of prophesy social and scientific developments, sometimes with amazing accuracy. Along with French writer Jules Verne, Wells is credited with popularizing science fiction, and such novels as The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds (1898) are still widely read. Many of Wells's stories are based on his own experiences. The History of Mr. Polly (1910) draws on the life of Wells's father. Kipps (1905) uses Wells's experience as an apprentice, and Love and Mr. Lewisham (1900) draws on Wells's experiences as a school teacher. Wells also
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