The Works of John Ruskin 2 Part Volume: Volume 35, Praeterita and Dilecta

by John Ruskin
Editor Alexander Wedderburn, Edward Tyas Cook

Cambridge University Press | February 18, 2010 | Trade Paperback

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The influence of John Ruskin (1819-1900), both on his own time and on artistic and social developments in the twentieth century, cannot be over-stated. He changed Victorian perceptions of art, and was the main influence behind ''Gothic revival'' architecture. As a social critic, he argued for the improvement of the condition of the poor, and against the increasing mechanisation of work in factories, which he believed was dull and soul-destroying. The thirty-nine volumes of the Library Edition of his works, published between 1903 and 1912, are themselves a remarkable achievement, in which his books and essays - almost all highly illustrated - are given a biographical and critical context in extended introductory essays and in the ''Minor Ruskiniana'' - extracts from letters, articles and reminiscences by and about Ruskin. This thirty-fifth volume, in two parts, contains Praeterita, Ruskin''s autobiography, and Dilecta, his own published selection of his letters.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 832 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 2.68 in

Published: February 18, 2010

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1108014895

ISBN - 13: 9781108014892

Found in: Fiction

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The Works of John Ruskin 2 Part Volume: Volume 35, Praeterita and Dilecta

by John Ruskin
Editor Alexander Wedderburn, Edward Tyas Cook

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 832 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 2.68 in

Published: February 18, 2010

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1108014895

ISBN - 13: 9781108014892

Table of Contents

Introduction; Bibliographical note; Part I. Praeterita, Vol. I: 1. The springs of Wandel; 2. Herne Hill almond blossoms; 3. The banks of Tay; 4. Under new tutorships; 5. Parnassus and Plynlimmon; 6. Schaffhausen and Milan; 7. Papa and mama; 8. Vester, Camenae; 9. The col de la Faucille; 10. Quem tu, Melpomene; 11. Christ Church choir; 12. Roslyn chapel; Praeterita, Vol. II: 1. Of age; 2. Rome; 3. Cumae; 4. Fontainebleau; 5. The Simplon; 6. The Campo Santo; 7. Macugnaga; 8. The state of Denmark; 9. The feasts of the Vandals; 10. Crossmount; 11. L''hotel du Mont Blanc; 12. Otterburn; Praeterita, Vol. III: 1. The Grande Chartreuse; 2. Mont Velan; 3. L''Esterelle; 4. Joanna''s care; Part II. Dilecta: Preface; 1. Reminiscences of Turner; 2. The History of the ''Téméraire''; 3. The author''s genealogy; Appendix.

From the Publisher

The influence of John Ruskin (1819-1900), both on his own time and on artistic and social developments in the twentieth century, cannot be over-stated. He changed Victorian perceptions of art, and was the main influence behind ''Gothic revival'' architecture. As a social critic, he argued for the improvement of the condition of the poor, and against the increasing mechanisation of work in factories, which he believed was dull and soul-destroying. The thirty-nine volumes of the Library Edition of his works, published between 1903 and 1912, are themselves a remarkable achievement, in which his books and essays - almost all highly illustrated - are given a biographical and critical context in extended introductory essays and in the ''Minor Ruskiniana'' - extracts from letters, articles and reminiscences by and about Ruskin. This thirty-fifth volume, in two parts, contains Praeterita, Ruskin''s autobiography, and Dilecta, his own published selection of his letters.

About the Author

Ruskin was one of the most influential man of letters of the nineteenth century. An only child, Ruskin was born in Surrey. He attended Christ Church, Oxford, from 1839 to 1842. His ties to his parents, especially his mother, were very strong, and she stayed with him at Oxford until 1840, when, showing ominous signs of consumption, he left for a long tour of Switzerland and the Rhineland with both parents. His journeys to France, Germany, and, especially, Italy formed a great portion of his education. Not only did these trips give him firsthand exposure to the art and architecture that would be the focus of much of his long career; they also helped shape what he felt was his main interest, the study of nature. Around this time Ruskin met the landscape artist J. M. W. Turner, for whose work he had developed a deep admiration and whom he lauded in his Modern Painters (1843). In 1848 Ruskin married Euphemia (Effie) Gray, a distant cousin 10 years his junior. This relationship has been the focus of much scholarship, for six years later the marriage was annulled on the grounds of nonconsummation, and in 1855 Effie married John Everett Millais, the Pre-Raphaelite painter and an acquaintance of Ruskin. During the years 1849--52, Ruskin lived in Venice, where he pursued a course of architectural studies, publishing The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849) and where he began The Stones of Venice (1851--53). It was also during this period that Ruskin's evangelicalism weakened, leading fin
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