This Town: Two Parties And A Funeral-plus, Plenty Of Valet Parking!-in America's Gilded Capital

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This Town: Two Parties And A Funeral-plus, Plenty Of Valet Parking!-in America's Gilded Capital

by Mark Leibovich

Blue Rider Press | July 16, 2013 | Hardcover

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The #1 New York Times and Washington Post bestseller

Tim Russert is dead.
But the room was alive.
Big Ticket Washington Funerals can make such great networking opportunities. Power mourners keep stampeding down the red carpets of the Kennedy Center, handing out business cards, touching base. And there is no time to waste in a gold rush, even (or especially) at a solemn tribal event like this.
 
Washington—This Town—might be loathed from every corner of the nation, yet these are fun and busy days at this nexus of big politics, big money, big media, and big vanity. There are no Democrats and Republicans anymore in the nation's capital, just millionaires. That is the grubby secret of the place in the twenty-first century. You will always have lunch in This Town again. No matter how many elections you lose, apologies you make, or scandals you endure.
 
In This Town, Mark Leibovich, chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, presents a blistering, stunning—and often hysterically funny—examination of our ruling class's incestuous “media industrial complex." Through his eyes, we discover how the funeral for a beloved newsman becomes the social event of the year. How political reporters are fetishized for their ability to get their names into the predawn e-mail sent out by the city's most powerful and puzzled-over journalist. How a disgraced Hill aide can overcome ignominy and maybe emerge with a more potent “brand" than many elected members of Congress. And how an administration bent on “changing Washington" can be sucked into the ways of This Town with the same ease with which Tea Party insurgents can, once elected, settle into it like a warm bath.
 
Outrageous, fascinating, and destined to win Leibovich a whole host of, er, new friends, This Town is must reading, whether you're inside the Beltway—or just trying to get there.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 400 Pages, 5.91 × 9.06 × 1.18 in

Published: July 16, 2013

Publisher: Blue Rider Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0399161309

ISBN - 13: 9780399161308

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– More About This Product –

This Town: Two Parties And A Funeral-plus, Plenty Of Valet Parking!-in America's Gilded Capital

This Town: Two Parties And A Funeral-plus, Plenty Of Valet Parking!-in America's Gilded Capital

by Mark Leibovich

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 400 Pages, 5.91 × 9.06 × 1.18 in

Published: July 16, 2013

Publisher: Blue Rider Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0399161309

ISBN - 13: 9780399161308

Read from the Book

Prologue June 2008 Tim Russert is dead. But the room was alive. You can’t work it too hard at a memorial service, obviously. It’s the kind of thing people notice. But the big-ticket Washington departure rite can be such a great networking opportunity. You can almost feel the ardor behind the solemn faces: lucky stampedes of power mourners, about two thousand of them, wearing out the red-carpeted aisles of the Kennedy Center. Before the service, people keep rushing down the left-hand aisle to get to Robert Gibbs, the journeyman campaign spokesman who struck gold with the right patron, Barack Obama, soon to be the first African-American nominee of a major party. If Obama gets elected, Gibbs is in line to be the White House press secretary. Gibbs is the son of librarians, two of the 10 percent of white Alabamans who will support Obama in November. “Bobby,” as he was known back home, hated to read as a child and grew up to be a talker, now an increasingly hot one. He keeps getting approached in airports and on the street for his autograph. He is a destination for a populace trained to view human interaction through the prism of “How can this person be helpful to me?” Gibbs has become potentially whoppingly helpful. People seek out and congratulate him for his success and that of his candidate, especially at tribal gatherings like this, a grand send-off for the host of Meet the Press . Next to Gibbs presides another beneficial destination: David A
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From the Publisher

The #1 New York Times and Washington Post bestseller

Tim Russert is dead.
But the room was alive.
Big Ticket Washington Funerals can make such great networking opportunities. Power mourners keep stampeding down the red carpets of the Kennedy Center, handing out business cards, touching base. And there is no time to waste in a gold rush, even (or especially) at a solemn tribal event like this.
 
Washington—This Town—might be loathed from every corner of the nation, yet these are fun and busy days at this nexus of big politics, big money, big media, and big vanity. There are no Democrats and Republicans anymore in the nation's capital, just millionaires. That is the grubby secret of the place in the twenty-first century. You will always have lunch in This Town again. No matter how many elections you lose, apologies you make, or scandals you endure.
 
In This Town, Mark Leibovich, chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, presents a blistering, stunning—and often hysterically funny—examination of our ruling class's incestuous “media industrial complex." Through his eyes, we discover how the funeral for a beloved newsman becomes the social event of the year. How political reporters are fetishized for their ability to get their names into the predawn e-mail sent out by the city's most powerful and puzzled-over journalist. How a disgraced Hill aide can overcome ignominy and maybe emerge with a more potent “brand" than many elected members of Congress. And how an administration bent on “changing Washington" can be sucked into the ways of This Town with the same ease with which Tea Party insurgents can, once elected, settle into it like a warm bath.
 
Outrageous, fascinating, and destined to win Leibovich a whole host of, er, new friends, This Town is must reading, whether you're inside the Beltway—or just trying to get there.

About the Author

Mark Leibovich is The New York Times Magazine chief national correspondent, based in Washington, D.C.  In 2011, he received a National Magazine Award for his story on Politico''s Mike Allen and the changing media culture of Washington. Prior to coming to the Times Magazine, Leibovich was a national political reporter in the Times'' DC bureau. He has also worked at The Washington Post, The San Jose Mercury News and The Boston Phoenix, and is the author of The New Imperialists, a collection of profiles on technology pioneers. Leibovich lives with his family in Washington.
 

Editorial Reviews

" This Town is funny, it''s interesting, and it is demoralizing ... I loved it as much as you can love something which hurts your heart." — John Oliver, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart “In addition to his reporting talents, Leibovich is a writer of excellent zest. At times his book is laugh-out-loud (as well as weep-out-loud). He is an exuberant writer, even as his reporting leaves one reaching for Xanax…[ This Town ] is vastly entertaining and deeply troubling.” —Christopher Buckley, The New York Times Book Review "It''s been the summer of This Town. What lingers from This Town is what will linger in Washington well after its current dinosaurs are extinct: the political culture owned by big money." —Frank Rich, New York Magazine " Many decades from now, a historian looking at where America lost its way could use This Town as a primary source." —Fareed Zakaria “Here it is, Washington in all its splendid, sordid glory…[Leibovich] seems to wear those special glasses that allow you to x-ray the outside and see what’s really going on. Start to finish, this is a brilliant portrait – pointillist, you might say, or modern realist. So brilliant that once it lands on a front table at Politics & Prose Leibovich will never be able to have lunch in this town again. There are also important insights tucked in among the barbs…So here’s to all the big mouths, big shots, big machers, and big jerks. In case you̵
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