To Kill a Mockingbird: The Timeless Classic Of Growing Up And The Human Dignity

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To Kill a Mockingbird: The Timeless Classic Of Growing Up And The Human Dignity

by Harper Lee
As told by Harper Lee

Grand Central Publishing | October 11, 1988 | Mass Market Paperbound

To Kill a Mockingbird: The Timeless Classic Of Growing Up And The Human Dignity is rated 4.5789 out of 5 by 76.
The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.


Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior - to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.


Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 384 pages, 6.75 × 4.25 × 1 in

Published: October 11, 1988

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0446310786

ISBN - 13: 9780446310789

Found in: Classics

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Absolutely Brilliant! Nothing less than brilliant!
Date published: 2014-05-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful Everyone needs to read this book. It is beautifully crafted and so so powerful.
Date published: 2014-01-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An All-Time Classic! Amongst all the books I've read, this is one had alluded me for all these years. After finally reading it in a few days, I was impressed that after more than half-a-century, Harper Lee's sole work still carries its weight. Her look at life in the Deep South revolving around issues of justice, racism, sexism, values, hardship within the life of Maycomb, Alabama are as powerful today as they were when the book was published. The characters of Atticus, Scout, Jem, Calpurnia and all the other denizens of Maycomb will stay with you for a long time. Amazing read!
Date published: 2014-01-20
Rated 3 out of 5 by from GOOD!! At first i totally felt lost cuz of all the southern slang but i keep through reading this book and it was good written by this author really enjoy it
Date published: 2013-06-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Heartwrenching To Kill a Mockingbird is probably my most favourite book. The story is so incredibly poignant, and it it touched my heart in a way other books haven't. It showed the beauty and resiliency of people in all of their imperfection, as well as the truly ugly side of humanity. I loved that it was from the point of view of a young child, someone who was somewhat naive, but at the same time had enough insight to try to figure out what was going on around her though it was beyond understanding, even for the adults. This is a book I will always treasure on my shelf, and I will be reading and rereading it for years to come!
Date published: 2013-05-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A great classic - To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee It has almost been 20 years since I read this book (from high school). Reading this story still confirms it is a classic. With Scout, her brother, Jem and Atticus her father who live in a small town in southern Alabama during the Depression. As well as, other colourful characters in Maycomb. The story captures warmth and humor from a child's perspective, while dealing with the issues of rape and racial inequality. Recommend, especially if you have not read it yet
Date published: 2012-08-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Absolutely Great To Kill a Mocking bird is a book written by Harper Lee. It is a story about innocence, love, sympathy and human nature. The story starts in the town of Maycomb, Alabama and is set during the American depression. It was a time of deep racial division and prejudice. The story talks about the lives of a southern family led by Atticus Finch, a lawyer, and his son Jem and daughter scout. The main focus of the story is the accusation, arrest and trial of a black man. Harper Lee writes, in the voice of a southern child. The story is easy to read and the action is entertaining. To Kill a Mockingbird will help you overcome any trouble, which can be experienced in life.
Date published: 2012-01-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from a real classic!! I read this book while in high school and decided to give it a re-read. This book is set in a sleepy Alabama town in the Great Depression. The Finch family, Atticus the father and Jem and Scout, his son and daughter are the main characters. Atticus is a father that does not say 'do as I say and not as I do' but actually lives the exemplary life. He imparts wisdom and humour and is honourable. Atticus represents Tom Robinson, a black man charged with raping a white teenager. Atticus is concerned about how the trial and his representation of a black man will affect his children. This story although about racial prejudice is more about compassion and honour, kindness and cruelty, and innocence. I loved this book every bit as much as the first time I read it decades ago. A real classic!!!!
Date published: 2011-11-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from To Kill A Mockingbird and Me It is hard to describe this book for me. To start with, To Kill A Mockingbird written by Harper Lee, is considered by most to be a classic and it deserves this status. The story first came to my consciousness when I saw the video tape of the movie version in a store. Reading the back of the case, the tingle of interest grew. Shortly after, I saw the movie on tv and it filled me. The book had to be mine, and it had to be mine now. Flashforward 15 years and I finally bought the book. Yes, I move swiftly sometimes. Flashforward two years and I finally read the book. I am decisive, I think. The book is told in a flashback from the POV of Scout, a little girl growing up in a small town in the deep south during the depression. She lives with her older brother and her widowed father, and hangs out with her brother’s friend and her housekeeper. She knows total love for her father, Atticus, who is a principled lawyer doing what he can for his family, society, and justice. As time passes, Scout becomes aware of a growing disquiet in the town. A trial is coming. Her father is the defense lawyer. Tensions are everywhere. The trial occurs. Truths are ignored. Scout learns about the human condition. And a child gets a broken arm. All these elements are essential to the journey. Scout is a child you want to hold, hug, talk and play with. She has a wondrous view of life and an intellect expanding beyond her years. Her father’s sense of helping and healing permeates into Scout’s being. She attempts, on her first day of school, to assist the teacher in understanding social structure of the class. Scout views her actions as simply being nice. The teacher does not. To complicate her existence, Scout can already read, thanks to Atticus teaching her. The teacher’s disapproval to this bothers her since she loves to read and it is something Scout can do with Atticus. Time spent with her father. Quality time decades before the term was invented. The honesty in the the scene is counterbalanced by Atticus’s solution. Tell the teacher a little white lie. Scout is happy and fine. As the story progresses to the trial, Scout’s worldview grows and widens. Things we as adults know and understand, Scout must now grapple with. Prejudice exists as a way of life. But it is not Scout’s way of life. Violence is the natural way of solving a problem. To Scout, it is frightening. The pain of the ending is multiple. The trial just hurts. People who know better, do not do better. The lessons, the words, the thoughts make no difference. This trail could happen today and the pain would be the same. In the book, it is a black man on trial, today it could be a homosexual. Hatred of the other no matter what the reason is a fundamental loathing of mine. Homosexuals are still targeted by rancid politicians and public figures who have no morals. I refuse to call them religious figures since there is nothing religious about them. When the journey ends, the next pain starts. It is over. Scout is still out their, growing up, living her life, but we don’t see that. Scout. Atticus. Jem. Dill. Calpurnia. Boo. They are all fixed in time. World War Two has not occurred and the Civil Rights movement is far far away. But I want to see what happened to them all, every happy moment and inevitable heartbreak that followed. In my imagination, we know in this universe that Scout and Dill would get married after she became a lawyer. Her child would be called Atticus. Life would be better with them around. I want to live in a world with them in it. I am still kicking myself that I took so long to read what is now one of my top five books. The love of the characters against the evil of the world permeates every word, every thought, every action. Everything. Everyone should read this book. We would all better for it. Scout: “Atticus, he was real nice….” Atticus: “Most people are, Scout, when you finally see them.” Thank you Harper Lee. You made me cry. Scoopriches P.S. To Kill A Mockingbird was published in 1960 and is 281 pages in paperback. Just read it. P.P.S. The movie, called To Kill A Mockingbird, was released in 1962 and stars Gregory Peck. He is amazing. Rent the dvd or stream it online today.
Date published: 2011-08-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from To Kill A Mockingbird and Me It is hard to describe this book for me. To start with, To Kill A Mockingbird written by Harper Lee, is considered by most to be a classic and it deserves this status. The story first came to my consciousness when I saw the video tape of the movie version in a store. Reading the back of the case, the tingle of interest grew. Shortly after, I saw the movie on tv and it filled me. The book had to be mine, and it had to be mine now. Flashforward 15 years and I finally bought the book. Yes, I move swiftly sometimes. Flashforward two years and I finally read the book. I am decisive, I think. The book is told in a flashback from the POV of Scout, a little girl growing up in a small town in the deep south during the depression. She lives with her older brother and her widowed father, and hangs out with her brother’s friend and her housekeeper. She knows total love for her father, Atticus, who is a principled lawyer doing what he can for his family, society, and justice. As time passes, Scout becomes aware of a growing disquiet in the town. A trial is coming. Her father is the defense lawyer. Tensions are everywhere. The trial occurs. Truths are ignored. Scout learns about the human condition. And a child gets a broken arm. All these elements are essential to the journey. Scout is a child you want to hold, hug, talk and play with. She has a wondrous view of life and an intellect expanding beyond her years. Her father’s sense of helping and healing permeates into Scout’s being. She attempts, on her first day of school, to assist the teacher in understanding social structure of the class. Scout views her actions as simply being nice. The teacher does not. To complicate her existence, Scout can already read, thanks to Atticus teaching her. The teacher’s disapproval to this bothers her since she loves to read and it is something Scout can do with Atticus. Time spent with her father. Quality time decades before the term was invented. The honesty in the the scene is counterbalanced by Atticus’s solution. Tell the teacher a little white lie. Scout is happy and fine. As the story progresses to the trial, Scout’s worldview grows and widens. Things we as adults know and understand, Scout must now grapple with. Prejudice exists as a way of life. But it is not Scout’s way of life. Violence is the natural way of solving a problem. To Scout, it is frightening. The pain of the ending is multiple. The trial just hurts. People who know better, do not do better. The lessons, the words, the thoughts make no difference. This trail could happen today and the pain would be the same. In the book, it is a black man on trial, today it could be a homosexual. Hatred of the other no matter what the reason is a fundamental loathing of mine. Homosexuals are still targeted by rancid politicians and public figures who have no morals. I refuse to call them religious figures since there is nothing religious about them. When the journey ends, the next pain starts. It is over. Scout is still out their, growing up, living her life, but we don’t see that. Scout. Atticus. Jem. Dill. Calpurnia. Boo. They are all fixed in time. World War Two has not occurred and the Civil Rights movement is far far away. But I want to see what happened to them all, every happy moment and inevitable heartbreak that followed. In my imagination, we know in this universe that Scout and Dill would get married after she became a lawyer. Her child would be called Atticus. Life would be better with them around. I want to live in a world with them in it. I am still kicking myself that I took so long to read what is now one of my top five books. The love of the characters against the evil of the world permeates every word, every thought, every action. Everything. Everyone should read this book. We would all better for it. Scout: “Atticus, he was real nice….” Atticus: “Most people are, Scout, when you finally see them.” Thank you Harper Lee. You made me cry. Scoopriches P.S. To Kill A Mockingbird was published in 1960 and is 281 pages in paperback. Just read it. P.P.S. The movie, called To Kill A Mockingbird, was released in 1962 and stars Gregory Peck. He is amazing. Rent the dvd or stream it online today.
Date published: 2011-08-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read! To Kill A Mockingbird is a story about the fictional town of Maycomb and how the events that take place there affect its inhabitants. One of the main themes of the novel is racial equality; Lee does an excellent job of recreating the prejudices of the previous century. This book makes you think. While at face value, the book may seem overly moralistic, weaved into the story are many intricate ideas that one has to think about in order to understand. The name of the book, for example, "To Kill a Mockingbird" suggests the loss of innocence that makes one consider how the innocence of many of the characters in the novel are destroyed by evils of society. A wonderful book with likable characters.
Date published: 2011-08-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from To Kill A Mockingbird and Me It is hard to describe this book for me. To start with, To Kill A Mockingbird written by Harper Lee, is considered by most to be a classic and it deserves this status. The story first came to my consciousness when I saw the video tape of the movie version in a store. Reading the back of the case, the tingle of interest grew. Shortly after, I saw the movie on tv and it filled me. The book had to be mine, and it had to be mine now. Flashforward 15 years and I finally bought the book. Yes, I move swiftly sometimes. Flashforward two years and I finally read the book. I am decisive, I think. The book is told in a flashback from the POV of Scout, a little girl growing up in a small town in the deep south during the depression. She lives with her older brother and her widowed father, and hangs out with her brother’s friend and her housekeeper. She knows total love for her father, Atticus, who is a principled lawyer doing what he can for his family, society, and justice. As time passes, Scout becomes aware of a growing disquiet in the town. A trial is coming. Her father is the defense lawyer. Tensions are everywhere. The trial occurs. Truths are ignored. Scout learns about the human condition. And a child gets a broken arm. All these elements are essential to the journey. Scout is a child you want to hold, hug, talk and play with. She has a wondrous view of life and an intellect expanding beyond her years. Her father’s sense of helping and healing permeates into Scout’s being. She attempts, on her first day of school, to assist the teacher in understanding social structure of the class. Scout views her actions as simply being nice. The teacher does not. To complicate her existence, Scout can already read, thanks to Atticus teaching her. The teacher’s disapproval to this bothers her since she loves to read and it is something Scout can do with Atticus. Time spent with her father. Quality time decades before the term was invented. The honesty in the the scene is counterbalanced by Atticus’s solution. Tell the teacher a little white lie. Scout is happy and fine. As the story progresses to the trial, Scout’s worldview grows and widens. Things we as adults know and understand, Scout must now grapple with. Prejudice exists as a way of life. But it is not Scout’s way of life. Violence is the natural way of solving a problem. To Scout, it is frightening. The pain of the ending is multiple. The trial just hurts. People who know better, do not do better. The lessons, the words, the thoughts make no difference. This trail could happen today and the pain would be the same. In the book, it is a black man on trial, today it could be a homosexual. Hatred of the other no matter what the reason is a fundamental loathing of mine. Homosexuals are still targeted by rancid politicians and public figures who have no morals. I refuse to call them religious figures since there is nothing religious about them. When the journey ends, the next pain starts. It is over. Scout is still out their, growing up, living her life, but we don’t see that. Scout. Atticus. Jem. Dill. Calpurnia. Boo. They are all fixed in time. World War Two has not occurred and the Civil Rights movement is far far away. But I want to see what happened to them all, every happy moment and inevitable heartbreak that followed. In my imagination, we know in this universe that Scout and Dill would get married after she became a lawyer. Her child would be called Atticus. Life would be better with them around. I want to live in a world with them in it. I am still kicking myself that I took so long to read what is now one of my top five books. The love of the characters against the evil of the world permeates every word, every thought, every action. Everything. Everyone should read this book. We would all better for it. Scout: “Atticus, he was real nice….” Atticus: “Most people are, Scout, when you finally see them.” Thank you Harper Lee. You made me cry. Scoopriches P.S. To Kill A Mockingbird was published in 1960 and is 281 pages in paperback. Just read it. P.P.S. The movie, called To Kill A Mockingbird, was released in 1962 and stars Gregory Peck. He is amazing. Rent the dvd or stream it online today.
Date published: 2011-06-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the best books of all-time! I first saw the film when I was just 7 years old, and assumed it was a kids movie because it had kidskin it. It taught me so much about humanity, but it wasn't until I read it in Grade 10 English class that I read this truly wonderful story. It is a timeless classic, one that I am always unwilling to finish, it is so good.
Date published: 2011-05-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Timeless! This book may be the best book ever written. It was unbelievably well-told and perfectly written. It is an absolutely timeless classic.
Date published: 2010-05-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A meeting with hope. When I first read To Kill a mockingbird, it was for an highschool project. Like most of the teenagers of my age, I was not a big reader and I thought that Harper Lee's masterpiece was just another school book. Perhaps, I was move by the main character, Atticus Finch. This simple lawyer stands for the right of the black people during the time of segregation in the United States. The seconf part of the book, the trial, is an inspiring moment of hope and hanger for egality. Personnaly, I never though that a book could have so much influence in my life.
Date published: 2010-04-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful - 2nd time around! I read this growing up and am reading it again with my daughter. Enjoyed it both times around though with somewhat of a different perspective being a parent this time. The character role of the aunt is interesting; could be developed more!
Date published: 2009-11-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Classic! I loved this! The story was nicely told and well-written. A classic story about inequality told from the eyes of a child. It was great!
Date published: 2009-10-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it! Loved it! This is another great classic that never gets old, no matter how many times you read it.
Date published: 2009-09-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Best book ever written The best book ever written ...bar none. Nothing else to say.
Date published: 2009-07-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great story and meaningful theme. I read this book 2 years ago and found it very difficult. This time i read faster and had a much better understanding of it. I really enjoyed reading this book. It had many adventures and mysteries in it. The characters were well developed and the narrator went into depth with detail. I'm interested in law, and the court scenes were probably my favorite. I really like that the book had a strong theme on racism and human equality. I would definitely read it again.
Date published: 2009-06-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved for a reason! I feel a bit silly writing a review for a book that has been in publication for so many years and is already held in such high esteem...but I LOVED this book so much I had to say something. I usually struggle with books that have been deemed 'great' because there is such high expectations involved that I feel the stories often fall short. Not so with this book! The story is about the Finches, a Southern family living in a small town during the Great Depression. Numerous issues are involved, most significantly, racial inequality. Throughout the book, while Scout is recounting stories, the reader is forced to interpret the true reality of the situation as all the events and people are described through the eyes of a precocious young girl. The characters are a large part of what make this book great - they are so lovable, dynamic and real. I don’t generally read books more than once, but I will most definitely reread this one. A truly outstanding piece of fiction.
Date published: 2009-06-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Well... ... I'm doing this book for my English drama production at school and I'm playing the character Jem Finch, the lawyer's son (Atticus Finch). I am a girl playing a male character, that's because I go to a girls private school so no guys :P lol. I really did enjoy this production a lot and it is my first play this year too :) I recommend this novel to anyone that likes suspense, action, thrill and mystery. I liked it soooo much the first time I read it, but I since I read it everyday because of drama, I kinda got tired of it too lol. That's why I gave it 3 in 5 stars :P Happy Reading!
Date published: 2009-05-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from REALITY, sad but...true ( L ) Ok, I finally understand, why so many people love this book. It showed the truth back in 1935. A sad reality yes, but a reality where it teaches you things in the end. I wish I actually bought this book instead of having to give it back to my grade 10 teacher. I love how the ending connects with the beginning, and Harper Lee's little summary toward the end of the book as well! I can't believe I haven't read this book early! It was really and truly Amazing!
Date published: 2009-05-09
Rated out of 5 by from Surprisingly Good! I read To Kill a Mockingbird as a novel study in my class, and I hadn't expected much from it. But by the end of the book, it had me sitting on the edge of my seat, desperate to know what happens. Scout is a tomboy living with her brother, Jem, and her father, Atticus. They live in Maycomb during a time where Negroes were looked down upon. Atticus is a lawyer that takes a case where he defends a Negro, Tom Robinson, who was suspected of raping a white woman. This book leads you through many troubles that include racism, sexism, justice, and other problems that many people face everyday. Harper Lee's writing was hard to understand at first, but once you get through a couple chapters, you get used to the way the characters talk and it adds a lot to the story. These type of stories are not enjoyed by everyone, but I really liked this book because it had great characters and important matters that were discussed.
Date published: 2009-04-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Dose of Equality This book is great! It’s all about the civil rights movement as told by a 7 year old girl ( Scout) in the span of 2 years of her life. What I find so fascinating about the book is how the author was able to deliver the message about equality so well through the most Innocent, children. She is a genus. Think about it, to children everybody is equal, they see no handicap, no social classes ,no color, no ethnicity they just see people. It’s life and other people who taint that beautiful instinct children have. Now couple this beautiful instinct with a parent who treats his children with respect and intelligence then you have the perfect combination. That parent is Atticus who throughout the book does not let evil defeat him, he keeps instilling the message of kindness to his children that they have to always meet evil with good no matter what. This novel deals with all kinds of equality issues, poor to rich, handicapped to not, the crazy and the not so crazy, it even tackles the issue of addiction but the most prominent story is the equality between black and white. The thing that struck me the most is that Atticus acts exactly the same way everywhere, whether he is in his house, at the court or anywhere he goes, he is the exact same person wherever you see him. If people could only take that message from the book then that would be enough, imagine if all people are always the same to their children, they don’t act all good and nice in front of other people then they are a beasts at home. Just be the same person wherever you are. I cannot urge you enough to go read this book, it’s full of wisdom in a very pure way. I am glad I read it as an adult and parent because I got so much more out of it. It is one of my all time favorites.
Date published: 2009-03-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Classic! I read this book for school and yes, i really did love it! The writing is very good and the characters are so dynamic unlike most of the static ones you get in today's books for young people. I personally believe that every person should read this book atleast once in their lifetime. It really helps you understand how Alabama was in the 1930s and teaches you to value the society we live in today. With all that being said, i truly don't understand why this title is so worldly known; although most people havent read it, somehow everybody knows the title! it a phenomenon i truly don't understand. i mean, yes this book was very good, but it wasnt THAT good.. i hope this review didn't end up confusing anybody lol! xoxo
Date published: 2009-02-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from great story Harper Lee was encouraged to write some of her childhood memories. What in the beginning seems like the story of three childhood friends in depression era Macomb, Alabama, turns out to be packed with insights to the makeup of human kind. This story is intriguing on many levels from the history of the area to the stereotyping of people. Most of all every turn was a surprise as told in the first person from the view of Scout Finch. And instead of telling the story in a six year old vocabulary she uses an exceptionally large repertoire to describe the people and events. This story is not as slow passed as one may guess from first glance as every remark and every action will be needed for a future action. A major controversial part of the story is the trial of Tom Robinson. Hoverer this is just a catalyst to help Scout understand the nature of people including her father Atticus and you will find that as important as it is it is just a part of the story with other major characters such as Arthur "Boo" Radley. Even thought it appears that Scout is the recipient of the insights, I believe we the reader is the real recipient. I can truly say that this book has changed my outlook in life.
Date published: 2008-12-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from LOVED IT! honestly.. when I started to read it.. I almost fell asleep because to me the begining was a bit dry, but once I continued to read on, I went from being angry, to sheading a couple of tears, then to final smiles because of the ends of certain situations in this wonderful story. Atticis was far most the BEST character in this story because he was a WISE single parent. And Scout was really funny! I fell in love with this book 6 years ago, and I still am in love with it!! =D
Date published: 2008-12-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from AMAZING This is my all time favorite book, it is absolutely amazing. I recommend reading this. I love the characters in this book, especially Atticus Finch. 5 stars, round of applause, tip my hat, whatever. Just, Wonderful.
Date published: 2008-12-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Atticus my hero I have never been so impressed by a fictional character since Beowulf (who managed to slay three dragons in his life time). He is the epitome of human morality, and his faults, if any, somehow make him rise even further above the rest of us.
Date published: 2008-09-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the best books written This story is so touching and you really feel for the main character in this novel. This was a book I had to read when I was in grade 10, and it was one of the best books I have ever needed to read for school. Its really sad some of the ways black people were treated back in the day.
Date published: 2008-09-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Pointlessly Exciting It appeared at first that the story had no particular purpose. Then, as I read on, I learned that the message in this certain book was meant to be read between the lines. Scout Finch, daughter of Attius Finch and sister of Jem Finch, is a tomboy living in a small Southern town. The most exciting climax of the story was during the courtroom excercise, with Atticus and his defendant. Atticus was a lawyer and he defended the hated race of that time: the African Americans. Though they are referred to as negroes in the novel, the derragatory term was not taken in any offensive way whatsoever. Scout was simply a girl trying to find her place, knowing someday she would be interested in clothes and makeup, not as she did now. But not yet. Not when there was so much to see and learn. A secret, hiding friend, a friendly housekeeper and a grouchy 'hormonal' brother keeps the story rich and enjoyable as Scout begins to understand that growing up is different for everyone, because everyone changes differently.
Date published: 2008-06-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from english class. Really good. Hard to put down.
Date published: 2008-06-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the all-time best! I have been trying to find time to read this book for years, after hearing about it for such a long time. Finally I dove in and what a great surprise. It was fantastic. It took me about 4 days to finish this story which is like lightspeed for this reader. I simply could not put it down. Now I want to see the movie...
Date published: 2008-04-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from decent It was a decent book. I thoroughly enjoyed how Harpee Lee had more than just one 'main' story involved, it seemed to jump around a bit which I will admit did keep me reading. Not to mention it is beautifully written, however... the story is at time hard to read just due to some of the characters. Not to mention it was pretty cliche. It definatly isn't the greatest read but a decent book none the less. If it wasn't written as well as it was it definatly would be complete garbage.
Date published: 2008-02-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Timeless Classic To Kill a Mockingbird is a classic. I tend to read a lot of modern fiction and don’t pick up a classic too often. But I discovered that there is a reason this book is considered a classic. It is an absolute masterpiece. I loved the writing style of Harper Lee – it was simple and easy to read and yet so very powerful in its message. The struggle life in the south with the prevalent prejudices of the time of the blacks and whites living together in a small town is shown through the eyes of a young girl named Scout. Life is straight forward and simple to her and there are clear lines between what is right and wrong. The life lessons provided by her father, Atticus, still ring true today, decades later. There are so many lines from this book that will stay with me. It was powerful and meaningful. I strongly recommend it to anyone. Especially those who think it will be an old book and, therefore, difficult to read. It’s well worth a reader’s time to check it out.
Date published: 2008-02-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A real eye opener for me. We all pretend we know about African American discrimination and how hard it was for humans to except one another in the past. But no one ever seems to tell us what it was like to live in those times. This book is about an American family that struggles when their father agrees to serve as the lawyer for an African American man. A good read, but don't even pick it up if you don't intend to finish it. I won't lie, it requires a lot of reading skills and vocabulary; a true university level read.
Date published: 2008-01-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the best books ever1 Great story that really any age can enjoy. Great mysterious characters. This is a book that I have read over and over again!
Date published: 2008-01-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I try to give 'em a reason: a review of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Despite being an avid reader someone TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD had escaped my horizons until I came across a cheap copy at a local used bookstore. I’m really glad to have read it. The novel is deeply engrossing. Harper Lee manages to narrate an enchanting story through the childlike eyes of a young girl, Scout. The first half deals with everyday events and relations, especially her relation with her brother Jem and a friend, Dill, who visits in the summer (supposedly based on Lee’s real-life friendship with Truman Capote). The second half with a legal trial of a black man accused of raping an impoverished white woman, also narrated by Scout who witnesses the trial from the balcony. What I really like about the novel is not its insight or philosophical depth. There are no grand insights into racism or the law but the characters are warm, likable, and admirable in many ways. The novel is simple and its simplicity is also its beauty and effectiveness as an excellent work of literature. *** “Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom. People said he existed, but Jem and I had never seen him. People said he went out at night when the moon was down, and peeped in windows. When people’s azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was because he had breathed on them. Any stealthy small crimes committed in Maycomb were his work” (13). “Talking to Francis game me the sensation of settling slowly to the bottom of the ocean. He was the most boring child I ever met” (85). “I noticed not without satisfaction that the mark of my knuckles was still on his mouth” (141). Page numbers from Warner Books edition (1982).
Date published: 2008-01-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A 'MUST' Read To Kill a Mockingbird is a timeless, coming of age novel. What can I say, that has not already been said about this classic, wonderful book. I can say nothing more then how I feel. It's a novel that is not only a book, its more then that. It takles down prejudice in a most knowledgable and sentimental way. This is a book that you won't just read, you'll read again, and again, and again, and then during all this, you'll be telling all your friends and family about this book, people you see walking down the street about this book (okay, well that may be a bit of an exageration) but you may even find youself writing up a review for this timeless novel. A lovely work of art.
Date published: 2008-01-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved It !! When my teacher assigned this novel, I knew it was coming. Older high school students had been warning me about how big of a bore it would be. I was a little scared to admit that I agreed. I never judge a book before I read it. Well, I started it, and I am dissapointed in myself to say , I absolutly loved it!! Im not going to lie. I was a little skeptical about it. Loved it so much! I'm also starting to love my english class more, because all we do is discuss it! Absolutly FANTASTIC. Definetly one of my favouriite books now. HIGHLY recommended.
Date published: 2007-12-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from My favourite book =) I honestly don't know how to put into words how amazing this book is. I guess the best compliment I can give it is: quite simply the greatest book I have ever read. And I'm one of those people who puts "Read 100 books this year" as a New Year's Resolution. I read this in high school and 10 readings later I'm still in love with it. Drop whatever you're doing right now and go buy a copy. Go. GO!
Date published: 2007-11-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Still impressive Considering when this book was written I am a little surprised that it was published. When viewed today events like White masses physically trying to bar entry of Blacks into universities seem both surreal and lame. Yet in that time such evils existed. Though the book is set well before those events the same level hatred existed. The book works well because it highlights the failings of men, but it does so with three dimensional characters that seem to come alive. The book deserves the awards it received. If you have ever wondered about whether to read it or not, do not hesitate. it should be on your bookshelf.
Date published: 2007-11-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from This Book Started It All I had to read "To Kill A Mockingbird" in highschool and until i read it, i had such a bad view of the book but until i finished reading the book i never knew i had such a passion for reading. I would absolutely recommend this book for any reader it is such a good book and such a quick and easy read, making it an amazing book!
Date published: 2007-07-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Classic "To Kill a Mockingbird" is truly a story that will mesmerize all readers alike, regardless of gender or age. This classic brings about topics such as racism, ignorance and discrimination intertwined with the power of truth, perserverance and faith. The power of this story is surely timeless as the theme will remain relevant for many years to come.
Date published: 2006-08-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Truly Touching Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird" is a apt perception of racial discrimination. Set in the United States, it could well be transposed to most any country, breathing life into values such as justice, perseverance, courage, strength, and truth. The story is well-fitted for a high school student to understand, but touches the hearts of all who read it. This masterpiece is a classic to read for generations to come.
Date published: 2006-08-01
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Worth Reading This novel is perfect for mature teens just entering high school. It covers many relevant issues such as racism, discrimination, social injustice among others. Set in the South during the1930s, this novel gives the contemporary audience a glimpse into a life very different from today.
Date published: 2006-07-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird is a truly great example of modern American literature. To kill a mockingbird has a variety of themes to it including racism in the souther U.S., good and evil, and life in the depression period. What makes this story genuine is the fact that Harper Lee is, I think, telling us what life in the depression was like through a child's perspective given that she spent her childhood in the depression. This book might not have the "edge" of the books by Ms. Lee's good friend Truman Capote however this book is wonderful. Read it.
Date published: 2006-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Poignant and Moving After reading it for the second time, I have decided, that “To Kill a Mockingbird” has got to be one of the best novels ever written. The imagery and the character development in the story is extraordinarily written. Harper Lee definitely knew what she was doing when she wrote this novel. Set in the 1930's, “To Kill a Mockingbird” tells the tale of a southern family, The Finch Family, and tells of their struggles, joys, and the controversial trial of Tom Robinson; a black man convicted of raping a white girl. This book delivers messages on all levels. It teaches the reader about social justice, courage, and ultimately the overall dignity of the human person. This is a novel that everyone should read at one time in his or her life. It will make you laugh, cry and contemplate about how you live your own life. By the end of the book, you will wonder, have you ever "killed a Mockingbird" in your life?
Date published: 2006-06-30
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not what I expected! To Kill A Mockingbird, a book I heard so much about over the years. An amazing read! Best book of the centery! You've got to read it! I picked the book up a few days ago to give it a try after years of hearing only good things about it. I must admit, I was greatly disapointed when I couldn't even get past the first one hundred pages. For a book that has been given much praise over the years, I can easily say it was boring, hard to follow, and something I would never pick up again.
Date published: 2006-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Relevant I re-read this after 20 or so years. it still touches you in ways that provoke and anger you at the injustice of the southern society.
Date published: 2006-06-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A truley great book I had to read this book for an English class in high school some years ago. Now that I'm in university and have read it again, the impact is far better than the first time. This novel displays everything that a truely "good book" should have. It touched my heart once, and it will keep touching my heart until I can't read anymore.
Date published: 2006-05-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from In Awe My english class is currently reading this masterpiece and I dont know how I can repay my english teacher for introducing me to this book.
Date published: 2006-04-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from amazing!!! this was an awesome book. i first had to read it for school, and i loved it, and i have now read it again, and it is the same, if not better the second time. a must read!!
Date published: 2006-02-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A True Classic to be Enjoyed This is a fine example of what is really a classic book that can actually change the thoughts of the reader and make them realize something. I read this book for the grade 10 curriculum and at first I was a bit skeptical that it was not going to be all that good. But this book is wonderful! Sometimes I kept thinking about it when we were done a few chapters! It can really put an impact on your mind which makes To Kill a Mockingbird a marvelous piece of literary genius.
Date published: 2006-01-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Best!!! I thought the book was amazing. It was so much fun to read and i could never put it down. And thats comming from someone whos read about three books in her entire life. I recomend this book to everyone. If you havn't read it you should!!!
Date published: 2005-12-19
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Highly overrated 'To Kill A Mockingbird' by Harper Lee is on endless classic book lists, and teenagers in high school like myself are forced to read it in English class. I found this book to have good underlying morals, which are easy to see if you can get past the boring plot, one-dimensional characters, and the meaningless drivvel that continues on for a couple hundred pages. Yet, most of this book seems like filler, or ramblings, if you will. Yes, taken into context the time period and the social and economic issues in the United States earlier in the 20th century, I can see why this book would have been more thought provoking and considerably more valuable to the reader. Unfortunately, this book does not stand the test of time, and now that there are millions of books to read I doubt the next generation will want to waste their time with it. Some of the issues in the book (i.e. racism), while still evident today, are not as controversial. This book does not leave any imprint in the reader's mind, raise new questions, or make sense of issues today. Then, I ask, what is the point of this book today? Really, there isn't. In conclusion, for a book with substance, and that breaks the mould of most books today, I would HIGHLY RECOMMEND Brave New World by Aldous Huxley or 1984 by George Orwell. Older than 'To Kill A Mockingbird', these stories are as thoroughly engrossing today as they were when they were first printed. If anything, they were ahead of their time, and are much, much more interesting.
Date published: 2005-12-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from To Kill A Mockingbird!..Read it! I am a grade 10 student and I had to read this book for school. At first, I thought it would be boring. But, you know what they say you can't judge a book by its cover. My teacher told us that it was a masterpiece of english literature so, I gave it a chance. I'm glad I did. This is the best book I have ever read in my whole life. It is interesting and the characters (the children) are so innocent and young but yet, they are so smart. I love how the reader gets to see how Scout grows up so much during the course of the book. I recommend this book to anyone, it is awsome and you won't regret reading it.
Date published: 2005-12-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from great book Oh my gosh. Im 13 and I didn't think this book would be all that great. My grand mother incouraged me to read it and I loved it. It was one of the greatest booka i have ever read. The way that Lee emhasized how big of a deal predjudice was is fabulous!!
Date published: 2005-10-16
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Don't Bother this book was a real drag to read. it was boring and left me feeling absolutely nothing. if you want to read a classic, try Catcher in the Rye.
Date published: 2005-09-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Just perfect All i can say is wow. I can see why it is called a masterpiece of american literature. I love how Scout was so innocent, yet she knew so much. Just an amazing book.
Date published: 2005-04-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I Love It. That's all I can say: I Love it.
Date published: 2005-01-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Touching, hilarious, heart-warming, beautiful... This book will forever remain on my top ten list of books ever. It is such a touching book, one that hits the heartstrings and creates the perfect tune resonating into your mind and staying there forever. Life changes reading this book. Your understanding of so many things and the perception you had of life is altered. Into the heart of innocence you delve as you follow the scene from the eyes of young Scout, and to see how we judge- how we judge. we need to leave that judging up to God as we cannot see all ends. we surely cannot see all ends... a truly captivating work, deserving in its entirety the Pulitzer Prize it was awarded. to those hesitant in reading it: read it!!!
Date published: 2004-11-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from All-time favourite Book i was in grade eight or nine when my dad first purchased to kill a mockingbird for me . He told me that it was i really good book and he thought i'd really like it, well i wasn't so sure and as a result it sat on the book shelf for about a year untill i forgot all about and my dad forgot he had even bought so he bought yet another copy after that one sat on the shelf for a few months i started to read and couldn't stop. now i contiuosly are recomending this book to my friends, and lending them this book, i carry the one copy around in my bag and take it out and start reading it again whenever i am given the opportunity. This book is amazing. My all-time favourite and the best book i've ever read.
Date published: 2003-11-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Heart-Warming and Touching I had heard about this book, being banned from libraries, etc., but I had never read it, never understood the fuss that people made over it. This book was required reading when I was in grade 10, but I didn't expect much. To say the least, I was completely surprised by it. The book was nothing like what I thought it would be about, and it just draws you in, and involves you with these people in this amazing story. There is good reason that this book is a classic, and I think that this is a great book to read in schools, as it adresses racism in such a straight-forward manner(which is why it got onto the book banning lists in the first place). What's great about this book is that it lets you draw your own conclusion about what is happening, as you see the story through Scout's eyes, who doesn't really understand all that is going on around her. This book has a wonderful message, all wrapped up inside an even more wonderful story.
Date published: 2002-09-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from atticus, the perfect dad when i first read this book more than 20 years ago i dreamed of a father like atticus. coming from a single family i needed the input on what fathers were. atticus was an honest lawyer a rare commodity in this day and age. scout, the main character, learns how strong her father is under his seemingly meek demeanor. atticus is truly a champion of the underdog. this book tells the story of the not too distant american south through a child's eyes. atticus teaches scout tolerance and the importance of standing up for one's beliefs. issues such as racial tension and moral depravity are discussed. this book is truly a classic and should be on every persons life reading list.
Date published: 2001-05-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Best Book Ever!!!!! The tale of a brother and sister and their fear of Boo Radley, their neighbour. Harper Lee writes an amazing story that captures both the heart and the mind. It is truly the BEST BOOK I have ever read and everybody should have a chance to read this amazing novel.
Date published: 2001-03-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Words Cannot Describe... Words cannot describe that brilliance and vim of the literary masterpiece. Now in grade nine, and having read it in grade six, I can still remember the vivid tale of Boo Radley, and the themes of the book. It is, without a doubt, the absolute best book I have EVER read.
Date published: 2000-12-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from From boring to brilliant Two years ago I was forced to read "To Kill a Mockingbird" as a grade twelve book report. I was not happy. Having read the book before in grade ten and hating it I reluctentley picked it up again. Now two years later I still haven't gotten the story out of my head. It truly is one of the best books ever written.
Date published: 2000-11-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Correct Rview This book was filled with drama and suspense right to the very end. The fact that Boo Radley did not need his reputation defended by Atticus, since he never did anything. This book should be read by every man, woman and child throughout the Great land of Canada and beyond!
Date published: 2000-11-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from great! This book is great.Every child should read it!I am reading it right now in english.The best book evr!! A classic!
Date published: 2000-10-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Touching Story In searching for a story that combined simplicity with wonderful plot structure, I found myself baffled at the thought of finding such a book. But after reading Harper Lee's amazing story of a man's fight for justice in a town plagued with ignorance, I realized that such a tale could exist. Set in the dreary years of the 30's, "To Kill a Mockingbird"is the story of a modest lawyer's attempt to prove the innocence of a man accused of murder while also expsoing the bigotry of an entire town. Faced against odds that are seemingly impossible to beat, Atticus Finch continues his pursuit of justice while also teaching his children a life long lesson on the judgements of others. A story rich in morals, riveting scenarios,as well as deep characters "to kill a mockingbird" certainly is a book that no one should go without. It teaches that it takes just one individual to change the views of an entire community.
Date published: 2000-09-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very Rich Detail This is the absolute best novel I have ever read in my 12 year life. Since my sister was doing a book report on the novel and there was a lot of hype about the novel, I decided to read it. Page after page, chapter after chapter, I couldn't help but to continue reading. This novel was very Rich and full of detail. I recommend this to anybody 10 or older. Have Fun reading it!
Date published: 2000-04-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An Amazing Creation This book is one of the best books I have ever read. We had to read it in our English class and did an extensive study on it, and many devices used by Harper Lee. I have never read a book that has opened my eyes so much to the issues of our world, and how satirical they can be. Through the way that Harper Lee writes the book, you start to feel like you really know the characters. You begin to respect Atticus, and look down on Mr Ewell. You feel the unfairness towards Tom Robinson, and the understanding towards Scout, Jem and Dill. The next time you are buying a book, this one should be at the top of your list. Rather highly recommended.
Date published: 2000-01-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from To Kill a Mockingbird We see the events of this story unfold through the eyes of narrator Scout Finch, an inquisitive six year old. We see and feel the prejudice of Alabama as her father, Atticus Finch, defends a Negro accused of raping a white woman. The children's preoccupation with their reclusive neighbor, Boo Radley, creates fear in the children and humor in the novel. The innocent, simple way in which the children see things makes the outcome more emotional. After several readings over the years, this novel still has the power to evoke strong emotional responses — something that other novels I have read cannot do.
Date published: 2000-01-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from It was awesome The book “To Kill A Mockingbird” was an excellent book. It demonstrated how difficult life was for a Maycomb resident. At the beginning of the novel, Jean Louise Finch, also known as Scout, gets in trouble at school for being able to read. She is harassed by other students because her father, Atticus Finch, is defending a black man. Jean Louise was brought up living, and always playing witht boys. She never wore a dress or any other clothing item that would be considered feminine. Jem Finch, Jean Louise’s brother, is at a time in his life when he is going through a number of changes. Jem is going from hanging out with his friends and playing little children’s games, to being around adults all the time.The main theme in this book is prejudism. We meet a lot of prejudice people in the court scene. Here a white man, Atticus, is defending a black man, Tom Robinson. There are plenty more interesting scenes you will read about in this book. I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading. It’s Excellent! I never thought that I would ever say this, but the book is better than the movie.
Date published: 1999-11-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from It's a great book! I just finished reading To Kill a Mockingbird in my grade 11 English class and I think it's an excellent book. You get so into the book and I think a lot of you would enjoy this book very much. Some of you might get offended because this book is somewhat racist but if you look over pass that you will really enjoy the book. You also have to realise that this book takes place in the 1930's so back then the world was pretty racist. If I were you. I'd buy this book because I'd know you'd all enjoy it :)
Date published: 1999-10-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from To kill a Mockingbird I read this at school when i was 13 (30yrs ago), and since then i've probably read another six times- most recently with my daughter ( it was her grade 10 read). This is a wonderful piece of literature that will never date. It is so well written that you can almost feel the steamy southern heat and hear the crickets cry.
Date published: 1999-09-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from My All-Time Favorite Book This book shows a great portrayal of how blacks were treated in the past. Although I had to read this in school, I have read it at least 9 times since I have graduated in 1998! If you haven't read this book yet, get on it because this is one of the best books out there ever!!
Date published: 1999-07-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from AWESOME!! HEY!! This was an AWESOME book!! I've read it like 5 times in a year! I have also recommended it to my friends and most of them have read it! And I STRONGLY recommend you to read this book if you havent!
Date published: 1999-07-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by from not to be that negative, but ive read way better apart from being forced to read harper lee's ' to kill a mockingbird ' as part of the grade ten curriculim, i felt that it was extremely hard to follow, and just the fact that the main charachter is a primary aged girl, i dont know how we could possibly relate, due to the fact that i can barely remember what it was like to be seven or eight. in order to enjoy harper lee's novel to the fullest, you practically have to be a detective, taking notes on everything, and i mean absolutely everything that happens during the course of the novel! most people dont read to do this, they read for pleasure. i mean, if i want to learn about the racisim back in the early 1900's, all you have to do it watch a movie made by OPRAH, and it will only take one tenth of the time!
Date published: 1999-05-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Book that Changed My Life This is one of those books that every teen should read, and then read again at each subsequent time of their lives. I can't anticipate how my of my personal sensitivities have been shaped and built around my responses to this story and the narrative voice telling the story.
Date published: 1999-05-04

– More About This Product –

To Kill a Mockingbird: The Timeless Classic Of Growing Up And The Human Dignity

by Harper Lee
As told by Harper Lee

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 384 pages, 6.75 × 4.25 × 1 in

Published: October 11, 1988

Publisher: Grand Central Publishing

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0446310786

ISBN - 13: 9780446310789

From the Publisher

The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.


Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior - to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.


From the Jacket

The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.

Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior-to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 15 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.

About the Author

Nelle Harper Lee is known for her Putltzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird, her only major work. In 1999, it was voted "Best Novel of the Century" in a poll by Library Journal. Ms. Lee was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for her contribution to literature in 2007. Her father was a lawyer who served in the Alabama state legislature from 1926 to 1938. As a child, Lee was a tomboy and enjoyed the friendship of her schoolmate, Truman Capote. After completing To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee accompanied Capote to Holcomb, Kansas, to assist him in researching his bestselling book, In Cold Blood. Since publication of To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee has granted very few requests for interviews or public appearances and has published no other novels.

From Our Editors

Originally published in 1960, To Kill a Mockingbird continues to be an all-time favourite. Part of the appeal of Harper Lee’s classic is the ever-relevant nature of such themes as love, dignity, justice and freedom. Every child should have the opportunity to experience this literary masterpiece set in America’s South.

Editorial Reviews

"A novel of great sweetness, humor, compassion, and of mystery carefully sustained."-Harper''s Magazine

Employee Review

FROM: The Best Book I Ever Read

We see the events of this story unfold through the eyes of narrator Scout Finch, an inquisitive six year old. We see and feel the prejudice of Alabama in as her father, Atticus Finch, defends a Negro accused of raping a white woman. The children's preoccupation with their reclusive neighbor, Boo Radley, creates fear in the children and humor in the novel. The innocent, simple way in which the children see things makes the outcome more emotional. After several readings over the years, this novel still has the power to evoke strong emotional responses - something that other novels I have read cannot do.

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