Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions Of A Media Manipulator

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Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions Of A Media Manipulator

by Ryan Holiday

Portfolio Trade | July 2, 2013 | Trade Paperback

Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions Of A Media Manipulator is rated 4 out of 5 by 1.
You''ve seen it all before. A malicious online rumor costs a company millions. A political sideshow derails the national news cycle and destroys a candidate. Some product or celebrity zooms from total obscurity to viral sensation. What you don’t know is that someone is responsible for all this. Usually, someone like me.

I’m a media manipulator. In a world where blogs control and distort the news, my job is to control blogs—as much as any one person can.

IN TODAY’S CULTURE…
  • Blogs like Gawker, BuzzFeed, and The Huffington Post drive the media agenda.
  • Bloggers are slaves to money, technology, and deadlines.
  • Manipulators wield these levers to shape everything you read, see, and hear— online and off.
Why am I giving away these secrets? Because I’m tired of a world where blogs take indirect bribes, marketers help write the news, reckless journalists spread lies, and no one is accountable for any of it. I’m going to explain exactly how the media really works. What you choose to do with this information is up to you.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 320 pages, 8.45 × 5.53 × 0.85 in

Published: July 2, 2013

Publisher: Portfolio Trade

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1591846285

ISBN - 13: 9781591846284

Found in: Marketing and Sales

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Trust Me, I'm Lying If you consume social media, you should read this book. Even if you consume only mainstream media, you should read this book. The two are inextricably intertwined—and frankly, it’s a little scary. Ryan Holiday exposes the problems that arise when people without journalistic training or ethics use journalistic tools. He asks the legitimate question: When did it become our job to do the fact checking? Isn’t that their job? He lays bare the “publish first, investigate later” practice of blogging that shapes today’s news. Trust Me, I’m Lying is a book in two parts. First, Holiday describes the many-armed blogging system, or what he calls “the monster.” He gives a mea culpa version of his own dubious past in media manipulation. Emails from fake names, leaked documents, planted comments, fake scandals—he lays it out in eye-widening detail. He describes how blogging works, the economics of it, and how easily manipulated it is, because of how it works and the economics of it. Bloggers “lie, distort and attack” to get the most clicks and page-views, and more money. They “speculate, rush, exaggerate, distort and mislead” for page-views and clicks. They don’t confirm sources, so anyone can send them any rumour and they will pass it on unchecked, for page-views and clicks. The second part of the book delves into the effect this is having on our society. Have you noticed a high level of “snark” on line? Yep. Snark generates page views and clicks, even as the cruel comments leave reputations and careers smouldering in the aftermath. Corrections, if they happen at all, are posted to generate—you guessed it—more page-views and clicks. Corrections only make things worse. They “pass along rumours as fact and rehash post from other blogs without checking them. It’s impossible to fight back against that. The Internet is the problem here, not the solution,” he writes. Here’s some of his advice from “How to Read a Blog”: •"When you see ‘Sources tell us . . .’ know that these sources are not vetted, they are rarely corroborated, and they are desperate for attention. •"When you see ‘Updated’ on a story or article know that no one actually bothered to rework the story in light of the new facts—they just copied and pasted some s**t at the bottom of the article.” •"When you see ‘We’re hearing reports’ know that reports could mean anything from random mentions on Twitter to message board posts, or worse.” You get the idea. We can’t take the internet out of the hands of bloggers; it’s too big and too wide for that. What we can do is change our awareness level and build up our cynicism muscles, so we don’t believe rumours so quickly, and we won’t add that one extra click or link to an unsubstantiated rumour. We need to change our habits.
Date published: 2013-03-07

– More About This Product –

Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions Of A Media Manipulator

by Ryan Holiday

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 320 pages, 8.45 × 5.53 × 0.85 in

Published: July 2, 2013

Publisher: Portfolio Trade

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1591846285

ISBN - 13: 9781591846284

About the Book

As blogs control the news, the job of a media manipulator, like Holiday, is to control blogsNas much as any one person can. Tired of a world where blogs take indirect bribes, marketers help write the news, and reckless journalists spread lies, he explains exactly how the media really works.

From the Publisher

You''ve seen it all before. A malicious online rumor costs a company millions. A political sideshow derails the national news cycle and destroys a candidate. Some product or celebrity zooms from total obscurity to viral sensation. What you don’t know is that someone is responsible for all this. Usually, someone like me.

I’m a media manipulator. In a world where blogs control and distort the news, my job is to control blogs—as much as any one person can.

IN TODAY’S CULTURE…
  • Blogs like Gawker, BuzzFeed, and The Huffington Post drive the media agenda.
  • Bloggers are slaves to money, technology, and deadlines.
  • Manipulators wield these levers to shape everything you read, see, and hear— online and off.
Why am I giving away these secrets? Because I’m tired of a world where blogs take indirect bribes, marketers help write the news, reckless journalists spread lies, and no one is accountable for any of it. I’m going to explain exactly how the media really works. What you choose to do with this information is up to you.

About the Author

RYAN HOLIDAY is a media strategist for notorious clients such as Tucker Max and Dov Charney. After dropping out of college at 19 to apprentice under Robert Greene, author of The 48 Laws of Power, he went on to advise many bestselling authors and multiplatinum musicians. He is currently the director of marketing at American Apparel. He lives in New Orleans.
 
Visit www.ryanholiday.net

Editorial Reviews

“Holiday is part Machiavelli, part Ogilvy, and all results…this whiz kid is the secret weapon you’ve never heard of.” —Tim Ferriss, author of The 4-Hour Workweek   “Essential reading.” —Andrew Keen   “Ryan Holiday''s brilliant exposé of the unreality of the Internet should be required reading for every thinker in America.” — Edward Jay Epstein, author of The Big Picture “The strategies Ryan created to exploit blogs drove sales of millions of my books and made me an internationally known name.” —Tucker Max “Behind my reputation as marketing genius there is Ryan Holiday, whom I consult often and has done more for my business than just about anyone.” —Dov Charney, CEO and founder, American Apparel “Holiday has written more than a dyspeptic diatribe, as his precise prose and reference to the scholarship of others add weight to his claims. A sharp and disturbing look into the world of online reality.” — Kirkus Reviews “His focus is prescient and his schemes compelling. Media students and bloggers would do well to heed Holiday’s informative, timely, and provocative advice.” — Publishers Weekly “While the observation that the Internet favors speed over accuracy is hardly new, Holiday lays out how easily it is to twist it toward any end… Trust Me, I’m Lying provides valuable food for thought regarding how
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