Tuesdays With Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man And Life's Greatest Lesson

Kobo eBook available

read instantly on your Kobo or tablet.

buy the ebook now

Tuesdays With Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man And Life's Greatest Lesson

by Mitch Albom

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group | December 1, 1997 | Hardcover

4.4752 out of 5 rating. 101 Reviews
Not yet rated | write a review
Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher, or a colleague.  Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, helped you see the world as a more profound place, gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it.

For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago.

Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded, and the world seemed colder.  Wouldn''t you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you, receive wisdom for your busy life today the way you once did when you were younger?

Mitch Albom had that second chance.  He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man''s life.  Knowing he was dying, Morrie visited with Mitch in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college.  Their rekindled relationship turned into one final "class": lessons in how to live.

Tuesdays with Morrie is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie''s lasting gift with the world.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 224 pages, 7.53 × 5.27 × 0.89 in

Published: December 1, 1997

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385484518

ISBN - 13: 9780385484510

save
37%

In Stock Not yet released

$17.78  ea

Online Price

$26.95 List Price

or, Used from $5.04

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Check store inventory (prices may vary)

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Tuesdays With Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man And Life's Greatest Lesson

by Mitch Albom

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 224 pages, 7.53 × 5.27 × 0.89 in

Published: December 1, 1997

Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0385484518

ISBN - 13: 9780385484510

Read from the Book

The Curriculum The last class of my old professor''s life took place once a week in his house, by a window in the study where he could watch a small hibiscus plant shed its pink leaves.  The class met on Tuesdays. It began after breakfast. The subject was The Meaning of Life. It was taught from experience.   No grades were given, but there were oral exams each week. You were expected to respond to questions, and you were expected to pose questions of your own. You were also required to perform physical tasks now and then, such as lifting the professor''s head to a comfortable spot on the pillow or placing his glasses on the bridge of his nose. Kissing him good-bye earned you extra credit.   No books were required, yet many topics were covered, including love, work, community, family, aging, forgiveness, and, finally, death. The last lecture was brief, only a few words.   A funeral was held in lieu of graduation.   Although no final exam was given, you were expected to produce one long paper on what was learned. That paper is presented here.   The last class of my old professor''s life had only one student. I was the student. It is the late spring of 1979, a hot, sticky Saturday afternoon. Hundreds of us sit together, side by side, in rows of wooden folding chairs on the main campus lawn. We wear blue nylon robes. We listen impatiently to long speeches. When the ceremony is over, we throw our caps in the air, and we a
read more read less

From the Publisher

Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher, or a colleague.  Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, helped you see the world as a more profound place, gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it.

For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago.

Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded, and the world seemed colder.  Wouldn''t you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you, receive wisdom for your busy life today the way you once did when you were younger?

Mitch Albom had that second chance.  He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man''s life.  Knowing he was dying, Morrie visited with Mitch in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college.  Their rekindled relationship turned into one final "class": lessons in how to live.

Tuesdays with Morrie is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie''s lasting gift with the world.

From the Jacket

Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher, or a colleague. Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, helped you see the world as a more profound place, gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it.
For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago.
Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded, and the world seemed colder. Wouldn''t you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you, receive wisdom for your busy life today the way you once did when you were younger?
Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man''s life. Knowing he was dying, Morrie visited with Mitch in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final "class": lessons in how to live.
"Tuesdays with Morrie is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie''s lasting gift with the world.

About the Author

Mitch Albom writes for the Detroit Free Press, and has been voted America''s No. 1 sports columnist ten times by the Associated Press Sports Editors. Albom, a former professional musician, hosts a daily radio show on WJR in Detroit and appears regularly on ESPN''s "The Sports Reporters." He is the author of Bo and Fab Five, both national bestsellers, and has also published four collections of his columns. He lives with his wife, Janine, in Michigan.

From Our Editors

Maybe it was a grandparent, a teacher or a colleague that understood you when you were young and searching, helping you see the world as a more profound place and offering advice to help you make your way through it. For Mitch Albom that person was Morrie Schwartz, his former college professor. Maybe like Mitch, you lost track of your mentor and the insights faded, making the world seem colder. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask him or her questions that still haunt you and receive wisdom for your life like you did when you were younger? Albom got that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life and their rekindled relationship turned into one final class - lessons on how to live. Tuesdays with Morrie is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Albom shares Morrie's lasting gift with the world.

Editorial Reviews

"This is a sweet book of a man''s love for his mentor.  It has a stubborn honesty that nourishes the living."
--Robert Bly, author of Iron John

"A deeply moving account of courage and wisdom, shared by an inveterate mentor looking into the multitextured face of his own death.  There is much to be learned by sitting in on this final class."
--Jon Kabat-Zinn, coauthor of Everyday Blessings and Wherever You Go, There You Are

"All of the saints and Buddhas have taught us that wisdom and compassion are one.  Now along comes Morrie, who makes it perfectly plain.  His living and dying show us the way."
--Joanna Bull, Founder and Executive Director of Gilda''s Club

Bookclub Guide

1. Did your opinion about Mitch change as book went on? In what way?

2. Who do you think got more out of their Tuesday meetings, Mitch or Morrie? In what ways? How do you think each would answer this question?

3. Do you think Mitch would have come back to Morrie''s house the second time if he hadn''t been semi-idled by the newspaper strike?

4. Discuss Morrie''s criticisms of Mitch throughout the book. Do you think Morrie should have been tougher on him? Easier?

5. Do you think Mitch would have listened if Morrie hadn''t been dying? Does impending death automatically make one''s voice able to penetrate where it couldn''t before?

Let''s Talk About Death

6. Does this book make Morrie''s death a public event? If so, how is it similar to other public deaths we''ve experienced as a society? How is it different?

7. Morrie referred to himself as a bridge, a person who is in between life and death, which makes him useful to others as a tool to understand both. Talk about other literary, historical, political, or religious figures who have also served this purpose.

8. Most of us have read of people discussing the way they''d like to die, or, perhaps, have been a part of that conversation. One common thought is that it would be best to live a long, healthy life and then die suddenly in one''s sleep. After reading this book, what do you think about that? Given a choice, would Morrie have taken that route instead of the path he traveled?

9. On "Nightline," Morrie spoke to Ted Koppel of the pain he still felt about his mother''s death seventy years prior to the interview. Is your experience with loss similar or different? Does what you''ve read in this book help ease any of that pain?

10. Morrie was seventy-eight years old when diagnosed with ALS. How might he have reacted if he''d contracted the disease when he was Mitch''s age? Would Morrie have come to the same conclusions? The same peace and acceptance? Or is his experience also a function of his age?

Let''s Talk About Meaning

11. Try the "effect of silence" exercise that Mitch described in your class or in your group. What do you learn from it?

12. Talk about the role of meaningful coincidence, synchronicity, in the book and in Mitch and Morrie''s friendship.

13. Morrie told Mitch about the "tension of opposites" (p. 40). Talk about this as a metaphor for the book and for society.

14. Mitch made a list of topics about which he wanted Morrie''s insight and clarity. In what ways would your list be the same or different?

15. Discuss the book in terms of structure, voice, and tone, paying attention to Mitch''s use of flashbacks and other literary devices. How do his choices add to the meaning?

16. Are college students today missing out because they don''t have the meaningful experiences that students in the 1960s had? Do you think Morrie thought they were?

17. Morrie said, "If you''ve found meaning in your life, you don''t want to go back. You want to go forward" (p. 118). Is this true in your experience?

Let''s Talk About Religion, Culture, and Ritual

18. Morrie believed, "You have to be strong enough to say if the culture doesn''t work, don''t buy it. Create your own" (pp. 35-36). How can people do this? How can this book help?

19. As his visits with Morrie continued, Mitch explored some other cultures and religions and how each views death. Discuss these and others that you''ve studied.

20. To the very end, Mitch arrived at Morrie''s house with food. Discuss the importance of this ritual.

Let''s Talk About Relationships

21. Was Morrie making a judgment on people who choose not to have kids with his statement: "If you want the experience of having complete responsibility for another human being, and to learn how to love and bond in the deepest way, then you should have children" (p. 93)? Whether or not he was, do you agree?

22. Mitch wrote, "Perhaps this is one reason I was drawn to Morrie. He let me be where my brother would not" (p. 97). Discuss Mitch''s relationship with Peter.

23. Discuss the practical side of Morrie''s advice: "Only an open heart will allow you to float equally between everyone" (p. 128). How could this advice be useful the next time you''re in a social or other situation where you feel out of place or uncomfortable?

24. Morrie said that in marriage, "Your values must be alike" (p. 149). In what ways do you agree or disagree?

25. Would Morrie''s lessons have carried less weight if Mitch and Peter hadn''t resumed contact by book''s end?

Item not added

This item is not available to order at this time.

See used copies from 00.00
  • My Gift List
  • My Wish List
  • Shopping Cart