What We've Lost: Bush's War on Democracy and Freedom

by Graydon Carter

Random House of Canada | October 14, 2008 | Hardcover |

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The editor of Vanity Fair magazine offers a hard-hitting assessment of the current Bush administration and its disastrous effects on America at home and abroad.

One of North America's leading magazine editors, Graydon Carter, addresses the fragile state of U.S. democracy with a searing review of the Bush administration. Carter has expressed his deep dissatisfaction with the current state of the nation in his monthly editor's letters in Vanity Fair - which have aroused widespread comment - and now provides a sweeping, painstakingly detailed account of the ruinous effects of this president's actions.

The invasion of Iraq, which has proven so costly for the U.S. in lives, dollars and international standing, is only the tip of the iceberg. It is the war at home, a quiet, covert, and in many ways more lasting and damaging war, that makes Carter most wary. In almost every aspect of American life, those in the Bush White House have chipped away at decades' worth of advances in personal rights, women's rights, the economy and the environment. They have eroded primary civil liberties in the name of the "war on terror" and have amassed record deficits and trade imbalances. They have rolled back policy in every significant area of environmental protection and have squandered the goodwill of the world in the wake of September 11. America is now widely perceived as one of the most dangerous of countries.

Carter discusses these topics and many more with great cogency and specificity, detailing what Bush's radical agenda means for America's future - and for Canada's, through its close and complex relationship with the United States. What We've Lost is the impassioned argument of a concerned citizen in response to the most precarious political crisis of our time.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 352 Pages, 6.3 × 9.06 × 1.18 in

Published: October 14, 2008

Publisher: Random House of Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 067931332X

ISBN - 13: 9780679313328

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What We've Lost: Bush's War on Democracy and Freedom

What We've Lost: Bush's War on Democracy and Freedom

by Graydon Carter

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 352 Pages, 6.3 × 9.06 × 1.18 in

Published: October 14, 2008

Publisher: Random House of Canada

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 067931332X

ISBN - 13: 9780679313328

Read from the Book

TO BEGIN WITH . . . In making his final decision to launch an invasion of Iraq, President George W. Bush did not seek the advice of his father, a veteran of World War II and a former president who had gone to battle with the same foe a decade earlier. Nor did he seek the overall final recommendation of his secretary of defense, or of his secretary of state, the only man in his cabinet who had been decorated for military service in wartime with the medals befitting a national hero. Instead, as Bob Woodward wrote in his book Plan of Attack , he consulted his God, a God that the president presumes takes sides in disputes between peoples. That reckless, unnecessary and unforgiving decision to wage a war of choice with a country that was neither an enemy nor a real threat is at the very root of all we''ve lost during George W. Bush''s presidency. We''ve lost our good reputation and our standing as a great and just superpower. We''ve lost the sympathy of the world following September 11 and turned it into an alloy of fear and hatred. We''ve lost lives and allies. We''ve lost liberties and freedoms. We''ve lost billions of dollars that could have gone toward a true assault on terrorism. It could fairly be said that in the age of George W. Bush, we have lost our way. The deceptions that took the United States into Iraq were the work of an administration without care for logic or truth. The aftermath, a war seemingly without end and one that is costing the country tens of billions of
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From the Publisher

The editor of Vanity Fair magazine offers a hard-hitting assessment of the current Bush administration and its disastrous effects on America at home and abroad.

One of North America's leading magazine editors, Graydon Carter, addresses the fragile state of U.S. democracy with a searing review of the Bush administration. Carter has expressed his deep dissatisfaction with the current state of the nation in his monthly editor's letters in Vanity Fair - which have aroused widespread comment - and now provides a sweeping, painstakingly detailed account of the ruinous effects of this president's actions.

The invasion of Iraq, which has proven so costly for the U.S. in lives, dollars and international standing, is only the tip of the iceberg. It is the war at home, a quiet, covert, and in many ways more lasting and damaging war, that makes Carter most wary. In almost every aspect of American life, those in the Bush White House have chipped away at decades' worth of advances in personal rights, women's rights, the economy and the environment. They have eroded primary civil liberties in the name of the "war on terror" and have amassed record deficits and trade imbalances. They have rolled back policy in every significant area of environmental protection and have squandered the goodwill of the world in the wake of September 11. America is now widely perceived as one of the most dangerous of countries.

Carter discusses these topics and many more with great cogency and specificity, detailing what Bush's radical agenda means for America's future - and for Canada's, through its close and complex relationship with the United States. What We've Lost is the impassioned argument of a concerned citizen in response to the most precarious political crisis of our time.

About the Author

Born in Toronto, Graydon Carter now lives in New York, where he has been the editor of Vanity Fair since 1992.
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