Wine with Food

by Joanna Simon

Simon & Schuster | February 13, 1997 | Hardcover

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What wine complements Thai food? How about sushi or chili? Can I serve red wine with chicken?

A simple formula -- white with fish and chicken, red with meat -- once dictated all wine and food pairing, but times have changed. Rules like this don''t fit the way people are eating today. Indeed, it is not unusual to find Mexican cuisine mixed with a hint of north Indian or French with some German influence. For the marriage of taste that we expect from food and wine, today''s global village cuisine requires the fresh approach found in Wine with Food.

In this beautifully illustrated book, Joanna Simon explores the relationship between wine and food with her hallmark unstuffy expertise. Rules can be followed for perfect partnerships, but they should occasionally be bent or broken. For instance, follow the rule of matching the weight of wine to the weight of food and you might serve a steamed chicken breast with a Sauvignon Blanc, but a dark coq au vin -- also chicken but very different -- calls for a full red Burgundy. An exception to that rule involves the intensity of flavor: fatty rich foods are best paired not with a heavy wine but with a light, crisp one that provides contrast.

Wines should not be matched to ingredients alone, however, and so Simon explains the impact of various cooking methods and sauces on the character of foods and recommends the consequent wine choices. A steamed salmon steak has a much more delicate flavor than one that is charbroiled, and the difference suggests a Chablis with the former but a Pinot Noir with the latter. Tomato sauce requires a wine like Sauvignon Blanc to stand up to its acidity, but if the sauce has meat in it, a full fruity red will be a better match.

Simon conveys the logic of food and wine marriages, combining authoritative knowledge of wine with commonsense observations. In a worldwide overview of each type of grape, from Chardonnay to Syrah, she includes an evocative description of the wines produced from that grape and suggests foods that are wonderful companions. Then she explores the classic combinations the world around and shows us, for instance, that the same quality that makes a Chilean Merlot such a perfect complement to local empanadas is also found in Australian Shiraz. A cold ratatouille is well partnered with local Provence whites, she points out, but the lively herbal qualities of those wines can also be found in California Sauvignons. Finally Wine with Food includes a convenient quick-reference section that summarizes food-to-wine and wine-to-food matches. With Joanna Simon''s wisdom, wit, and style, Wine with Food is the ultimate guide to today''s most delicious wine and food combinations.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 160 Pages, 8.66 × 10.63 × 0.39 in

Published: February 13, 1997

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0684835223

ISBN - 13: 9780684835228

Found in: Wine and Spirits

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– More About This Product –

Wine with Food

Wine with Food

by Joanna Simon

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 160 Pages, 8.66 × 10.63 × 0.39 in

Published: February 13, 1997

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0684835223

ISBN - 13: 9780684835228

Read from the Book

The Principles When the gastronomic map of the world was divided by much sharper boundaries than it is today and the viticultural map was much more limited, there were some very simple rules that could be applied more or less usefully to the matching of wine to food. But culinary exchange and interplay and a greatly expanded and altered wine scene mean that there are new -- more exciting -- ways of approaching the subject. Rules & How to Break Them If this book were about ethereal wine and food marriages, it would be very short indeed -- just one paragraph. There are a few famous partnerships where food and wine seem magically to enhance each other (see list below), but, in general, matching wine and food is not about divining perfect and exclusive pairings. Most of the time it is about choosing food and wine that are happy together -- each made more enjoyable, in part, simply by the presence of the other -- and most of the time several different types of wine will cheerfully accompany any one dish. In the past there were rules: white wine with fish and white meat, red wine with red meat and appropriate local wines with regional food. It is easy to denounce these today, for being sweeping, narrow-minded and limited in application, but in their context they made more sense. Cooking styles throughout the world were more strictly defined and self-contained. You didn''t mix a little French haute cuisine with a little German, a touch of Thai with a tad of southern Italian, or a li
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Table of Contents

Contents

INTRODUCTION

PRINCIPLES

Rules & How to Break Them
Weight & Intensity
Acidity, Salt, Sweetness & Tannin
Tricky Ingredients
Cheese

THE EFFECT OF COOKING

Poaching & Steaming
Frying
Braising & Stewing
Grilling
Roasting
Sauces
Cooking with Wine

PLANNING

Serving: the Order of Wine
Special Occasions
Special Bottles
Serving Suggestions

GRAPES AND WINES

The Changing Face of Wine
Chardonnay
Sauvignon Blanc
Riesling
Other White Grapes
Cabernet Sauvignon
Pinot Noir
Syrah
Other Red Grapes

WORLD CLASSIC COMBINATIONS

Introduction to Europe
France
Italy
Spain
Portugal
Germany
Switzerland
Austria
Greece
Scandinavia
Northern Europe
The New World
America
South America
Australia
New Zealand
India and the Far East
India
China
Thailand
Japan

MATCHING WINE AND MATCHING FOOD

-- some quick solutions
Food with wine
Wine with food

INDEX

From the Publisher

What wine complements Thai food? How about sushi or chili? Can I serve red wine with chicken?

A simple formula -- white with fish and chicken, red with meat -- once dictated all wine and food pairing, but times have changed. Rules like this don''t fit the way people are eating today. Indeed, it is not unusual to find Mexican cuisine mixed with a hint of north Indian or French with some German influence. For the marriage of taste that we expect from food and wine, today''s global village cuisine requires the fresh approach found in Wine with Food.

In this beautifully illustrated book, Joanna Simon explores the relationship between wine and food with her hallmark unstuffy expertise. Rules can be followed for perfect partnerships, but they should occasionally be bent or broken. For instance, follow the rule of matching the weight of wine to the weight of food and you might serve a steamed chicken breast with a Sauvignon Blanc, but a dark coq au vin -- also chicken but very different -- calls for a full red Burgundy. An exception to that rule involves the intensity of flavor: fatty rich foods are best paired not with a heavy wine but with a light, crisp one that provides contrast.

Wines should not be matched to ingredients alone, however, and so Simon explains the impact of various cooking methods and sauces on the character of foods and recommends the consequent wine choices. A steamed salmon steak has a much more delicate flavor than one that is charbroiled, and the difference suggests a Chablis with the former but a Pinot Noir with the latter. Tomato sauce requires a wine like Sauvignon Blanc to stand up to its acidity, but if the sauce has meat in it, a full fruity red will be a better match.

Simon conveys the logic of food and wine marriages, combining authoritative knowledge of wine with commonsense observations. In a worldwide overview of each type of grape, from Chardonnay to Syrah, she includes an evocative description of the wines produced from that grape and suggests foods that are wonderful companions. Then she explores the classic combinations the world around and shows us, for instance, that the same quality that makes a Chilean Merlot such a perfect complement to local empanadas is also found in Australian Shiraz. A cold ratatouille is well partnered with local Provence whites, she points out, but the lively herbal qualities of those wines can also be found in California Sauvignons. Finally Wine with Food includes a convenient quick-reference section that summarizes food-to-wine and wine-to-food matches. With Joanna Simon''s wisdom, wit, and style, Wine with Food is the ultimate guide to today''s most delicious wine and food combinations.

About the Author

Joanna Simon is the eloquent and expert author of Discovering Wine. She is the wine columnist for the Sunday Times in London and was the 1992 winner of the Glenfiddich Wine Writer of the Year Award.

From Our Editors

Using the same refreshingly accessible approach that made her "Discovering Wine" so successful, award-winning wine writer Joanna Simon explores the dynamic relationship between wine and food. 125 full-color illustrations
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