Wuthering Heights

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Wuthering Heights

by Emily Bronte
Introduction by Diane Johnson

Random House Publishing Group | November 28, 2000 | Trade Paperback

Wuthering Heights is rated 4.15 out of 5 by 20.
Introduction by Diane Johnson
Commentary by George Henry Lewes, Virginia Woolf, and E. M. Forster
 
Wuthering Heights, first published in 1847, the year before the author’s death at the age of thirty, endures today as perhaps the most powerful and intensely original novel in the English language. The epic story of Catherine and Heathcliff plays out against the dramatic backdrop of the wild English moors, and presents an astonishing metaphysical vision of fate and obsession, passion and revenge. “Only Emily Brontë,” V. S. Pritchett said, “exposes her imagination to the dark spirit.” And Virginia Woolf wrote, “Hers . . . is the rarest of all powers. She could free life from its dependence on facts . . . by speaking of the moor make the wind blow and the thunder roar.” This edition also includes Charlotte Brontë’s original Introduction.
 
INCLUDES A MODERN LIBRARY READING GROUP GUIDE

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 464 pages, 7.98 × 5.21 × 0.98 in

Published: November 28, 2000

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0375756442

ISBN - 13: 9780375756443

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from Difficult to like I bought this book because I figured it was a classic and I ought to read it at some point, but this was no Jane Austen novel. It was well written and I can understand why one might praise it, however the characters (although well developed) were horrible people for the most part. I could not see past my dislike of the characters to be able to grasp the "terrific love story" it is supposed to be. It was incredibly difficult for me to get through this book, but I said I would recommend it to a friend because although it was not an enjoyable read for me I can see how it would be for certain people. It was at least an interesting read and though I would not do it again I am glad that I did it once.
Date published: 2014-06-12
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Painfully difficult to read This novel was a mandatory reading assigned in my high school English class. Fourteen years later, I still recall how boring this novel was. It was a difficult read and the story itself was unable to capture anyone's attention. I fail to see the reason why this book has received any praise or attention. 
Date published: 2014-03-01
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Awful! This book was painful to read! It was mind-numbingly boring, had dreadful, unlikable characters who seemed to do nothing but get mad at each other (Heathcliff is one of the worst characters i literature history, and a total jerk), terrible structure (half of the book is the narrator being told a story), bland, uninteresting story, and all in all it was one of the worst books I ever read. It had such an awful plot- it was so uninteresting. I'm surprised I suffered through the whole thing. I can't believe this is considered a classic. It was so boring I fell asleep twice while reading it. While reading this book half the time it just seemed like I was reading words with no meaning attached to them. Do not waste your time with this awful book. 
Date published: 2013-11-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Haunting Love Story Emily Bronte skillfully creates a tale of thwarted love and undying passion. In the dark, gloomy setting of the moors, two characters fall deeply in love with one another, which serves as the catalyst for the events in the rest of the novel. The first half of the book shows the powerful romance between Catherine and Healthcliff, while the second half involves Catherine's daughter and a boy named Hareton Earnshaw. Although the characters are well-developed, none of them are likeable and are full of faults. What is endearing about them however, is their capacity to love. A reader can even feel sympathy for the cold-hearted and brutal Heathcliff, whose affection for Catherine began from childhood and ended at death. It is an amazing read and a tragic classic that will touch any reader.
Date published: 2011-08-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Library Staple This was my third or fourth go round with this remarkable classic, which, for me, rates right up there with Hardy's Jude the Obscure. There is a richness of character development here, a taught arc of plot. Bronte creates such complex characters that you both love and detest, and in the end she forges a tragedy that has earned its right in classic literature. Like Hardy, she runs an undercurrent of environment, almost as a background character, that shapes and influences both protagonists and plot. And while the plot's denouement is predictable, that predictability acts as tension, reinforcing the futility of escaping both the nature of one's environment, and the nature of one's basic character. For me it is a staple of our library, and should be for any true lover of literature.
Date published: 2010-10-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great book I started reading Wuthering Heights and could not put it down. It’s a tale of passion and revenge and I found it very unsettling. Most all of the characters have a capacity to resort to violence; even the weakest of them seem pushed to commit or desire to commit violence or self-destruction. It’s very well written and as much as it arouses discomfort, it also has sweet moments. It’s impossible to begin and not finish it but what’s more, it’s impossible to lay it down and forget about it. I’m not sure whose plight is worse: Catherine’s or Heathcliff’s? I will have to come back to it again to figure it out.
Date published: 2009-12-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Darkly Romantic Novel, Wuthering Heights is a disturbingly dark book about love, obsession and revenge. It is a romantic novel full of twists and turns that nearly requires the reader to keep a running dictionary of characters, especially since names have a tendency to pop up in different places and on different people throughout the novel. I read this novel for a class assignment in Victorian Literature but it is helpful to know that the book employs many themes of the Romantic literary genre as well. Victorian ideas of social class are brought up as well as the fantasies of adolescence. Some of the Romantic ideas found in the novels include the idea of the tragic landscape. The landscape of the novel is foreboding and isolated, borrowed most likely from the gothic novel. The characters are extreme in their varying passions and the concept of the dream is used in a type of ghostly communication. One of the story's narrators has a dream of being visited by the ghost of Catherine, which causes a startling and dramatic reaction in Heathcliff. The belief that the reader cannot fully hate Heathcliff because of how he was mistreated as a child is also a Romantic ideal. The story contains a great deal of darkness and some cruelty, which may turn readers away. Love is often extreme to the point of violence in the novel while the romances themselves are nearly incestuous in tone. Cousins marry and adopted siblings hold lifelong affections and obsessions for each other. The novel also illustrates an element of cruelty that can be slightly disturbing at times. Heathcliff, the novel's antagonist, goes as far as to string up the beloved dog of the young woman he courts after Catherine rejects him. The main focus of the story is the rather twisted love story element that develops between Catherine and Heathcliff. Heathcliff is adopted into Catherine's family at a young age and the pair become close, though Catherine rejects him because he is poor and instead marries a rich neighbor. Though throughout the novel, other romances develop between the two highly inbred families, they are side stories in comparison to the main romance. The love of Catherine and Heathcliff eventually develops into an obsession that lasts, and in fact becomes even stronger with the eventual death of Catherine. Her spirit seems to haunt Heathcliff and further fire his obsession. Even before Catherine's death this obsessive love broadens to include an equally obsessive drive to ruin the lives of all the people who mistreated him and stood between him and Catherine, including her husband and older brother. These obsessions eventually lead to the last of the major themes of the novel, revenge. A good part of the book is spent upon Heathcliff's attempts to destroy the lives of anyone and everyone who mistreated him or got in the way of his relationship with Catherine. His need for revenge does not lessen as the book moves on and Heathcliff continues to take his revenge even upon the next generation, including Catherine's daughter and his own son. Whether or not Heathcliff succeeds in his attempts I leave to the reader. Personally, I enjoyed this book a great deal, if for no other reason than the simple fact that it was quite different from the usual school assigned reading. I was pleasantly surprised by how well woven and engaging the book was. The calculating lengths that Heathcliff goes to in order fulfill his quest for revenge are nearly reason enough to read the book. The old style language of the book, which I expected to be a hindrance, was hardly noticeable. In short, if you can handle (or enjoy) the book's darker aspects, then I highly recommend this classic to you. (And I'm not just saying that because I have to! ;))Enjoy!
Date published: 2009-09-05
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Classic This old classic is not for everyone as it can be hard to get into or some people might find it a bit of a dry read. This book made me wonder if I lived in that era and in any of the characters situations, how would I have dealt with it all. I found I wanted to keep reading to understand the characters better and why they did the things they did. Overall though, I'm glad I read it.
Date published: 2009-04-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Powerful Classic It can be difficult to read as the dialect is so old. But, the story takes a hold of you, the characters are so real. The love and loss with Cathy and Heathcliff is powerful and tragic.
Date published: 2009-03-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very Interesting (Recommend) Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte is an amazing classic that is very exciting and easy to understand. It is very well written and I am sure every one will enjoy it. This novel is full of so much emotion and was a great experience to read. It is about a boy that is found by Mr. Earnshaw and brought home one day. He is considered a savage, named Heathcliff, who falls madly in love with Catherine Earnshaw, the daughter of his benefactor. Misery results from their great longing for each other. They live in the moors, far away from the rest of society. What will happen with their relationship? What are the consequences of their love?
Date published: 2008-06-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from a must read if you've read twilight i have to read this book i havent read it yet but i reallly want to it seems like a great book if bella from twilight likes it i bet i will too
Date published: 2008-04-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Worthy Classic There seems to be an underlining meaning to the events in this book. A message is there for you to crack, a warning on the instability of society and human behavior. It is packed with contrast and parallel symbols. Not only that, but there is an unreliable narrator that really shows the reader’s true colours by their reactions to what is being said.
Date published: 2007-11-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Don't Shy Away - Great Deal Don't shy away from this product because it doesn't show the cover page. It is part of the Dover Classics Edition and it is unabridged. This is the bibliographical note from the book "This Dover edition, first published in 1996, contains the unabridged text of the first edition of Wuthering Heights: A Novel, published in 1847 by Thomas Cautley Newby, in London".
Date published: 2006-09-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent An amazing book that takes the reader on a romantic roller coster. Teaches a great lesson of the effects of our treatment of others... Recommended to everyone.
Date published: 2006-09-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Reaching New Heights in Literature A story so gripping that no one can peel it away from your fingertips. Charm, devotion, emotion, horror, love, depression -- all these words cannot even describe the elements of the story. A masterpiece of Victorian literature written by a girl who had never known romantic love. Beautiful and touching, heartrending and tragic. Emily Bronte is the master of love and tragedy. A book for anyone; especially anyone who is studying nineteenth century literature.
Date published: 2001-04-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ~Classic~ One of the best loved romances in history, Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights is breathtakingly haunting. The story of a boy who fell in love with the girl of the house. He leaves so that her marrying him won't "degrade" her, just to find out she has married another. These two characters were destined for each other, and their doomed love makes this story sad. Yet, with Cathy two, they, in a way, reclaimed their love. A great read and not to be missed.
Date published: 2001-02-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A masterpiece!!! Wuthering Heights is one of the most intense and captivating novels I've ever read. Its full of the most passionate of human emotions, love/hate, revenge and greed, to mention a few. Emily Bronte tells a romantic, yet very grim, story of a man (Heathcliff) driven by his maddening desire to possess Cathy. Though his love for her is genuine, its destructive in its utterly zealous nature and very much the cause of Heathcliff's ultimate demise. A must-read for eveyone!!
Date published: 2000-10-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Extraordinary This is a bizarre yet unforgettably romantic love story. The reader can never forget the astonishing stubborn love of Heathcliff, the mad lover. I will never be able to forget this book. Wuthering Heights, not to be missed.
Date published: 2000-06-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful This book is truly one of the most unforgettable classics, and one of my personal favorites. The passion of this book is seen vividly through Heathcliff and Cathy. The eerieness of story line absolutly gave me shivers. It's a must read for all people who have a liking for romance, hatred, revenge, passion or mystery. Excelent!
Date published: 1999-07-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Wuthering Heights If you enjoy good, thought-provoking literature that simultaneously confuses and enlightens you, you will definitely enjoy this classic Victorian novel. Rich, intriguing characters generate conflicting feelings of love and hatred. They are both grotesque and romantic, vicious and tragic, torturers and victims. The story's twists and turns will leave you bewildered - and fascinated.
Date published: 1999-03-19

– More About This Product –

Wuthering Heights

by Emily Bronte
Introduction by Diane Johnson

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 464 pages, 7.98 × 5.21 × 0.98 in

Published: November 28, 2000

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0375756442

ISBN - 13: 9780375756443

About the Book

Wuthering Heights, first published in 1847, the year before the author's death at the age of thirty, endures today as perhaps the most powerful and intensely original novel in the English language. The epic story of Catherine and Heathcliff plays out against the dramatic backdrop of the wild English moors, and presents an astonishing metaphysical vision of fate and obsession, passion and revenge. " Only Emily Brontë , " V. S. Pritchett said, " exposes her imagination to the dark spirit." And Virginia Woolf wrote, " Hers...is the rarest of all powers. She could free life from its dependence on facts...by speaking of the moor make the wind blow and the thunder roar." This edition also includes Charlotte Brontë 's original Introduction.

Read from the Book

CHAPTER 1 1801--I have just returned from a visit to my landlord--the solitary neighbour that I shall be troubled with. This is certainly a beautiful country! In all England, I do not believe that I could have fixed on a situation so completely removed from the stir of society. A perfect misanthropist''s Heaven: and Mr. Heathcliff and I are such a suitable pair to divide the desolation between us. A capital fellow! He little imagined how my heart warmed towards him when I beheld his black eyes withdraw so suspiciously under their brows, as I rode up, and when his fingers sheltered themselves, with a jealous resolution, still further in his waistcoat, as I announced my name. ''Mr. Heathcliff?'' I said. A nod was the answer. ''Mr. Lockwood, your new tenant, sir. I do myself the honour of calling as soon as possible after my arrival, to express the hope that I have not inconvenienced you by my perseverance in soliciting the occupation of Thrushcross Grange: I heard yesterday you had had some thoughts--'' ''Thrushcross Grange is my own, sir,'' he interrupted, wincing. ''I should not allow any one to inconvenience me, if I could hinder it--walk in!'' The ''walk in'' was uttered with closed teeth, and expressed the sentiment, ''Go to the Deuce'': even the gate over which he leant manifested no sympathizing movement to the words; and I think that circumstance determined me to accept the invitation: I felt interested in a man who seemed more exaggeratedly reserved than myself. When h
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From the Publisher

Introduction by Diane Johnson
Commentary by George Henry Lewes, Virginia Woolf, and E. M. Forster
 
Wuthering Heights, first published in 1847, the year before the author’s death at the age of thirty, endures today as perhaps the most powerful and intensely original novel in the English language. The epic story of Catherine and Heathcliff plays out against the dramatic backdrop of the wild English moors, and presents an astonishing metaphysical vision of fate and obsession, passion and revenge. “Only Emily Brontë,” V. S. Pritchett said, “exposes her imagination to the dark spirit.” And Virginia Woolf wrote, “Hers . . . is the rarest of all powers. She could free life from its dependence on facts . . . by speaking of the moor make the wind blow and the thunder roar.” This edition also includes Charlotte Brontë’s original Introduction.
 
INCLUDES A MODERN LIBRARY READING GROUP GUIDE

From the Jacket

"It is as if Emily Brontë could tear up all that we know human beings by, and fill these unrecognizable transparencies with such a gust of life that they
transcend reality."
--Virginia Woolf

About the Author

Diane Johnson is the author of many books, including the bestselling novel Le Divorce, which was a 1997 National Book Award finalist. She divides her time between San Francisco and Paris.

Editorial Reviews

"It is as if Emily Brontë could tear up all that we know human beings by, and fill these unrecognizable transparencies with such a gust of life that they
transcend reality."
--Virginia Woolf

Bookclub Guide

1. 	To what extent do you think the setting of the novel contributes to, or informs, what takes place? Do you think the moors are a character in their own right? How do you interpret Bronte''s view of nature and the landscape?

2. 	Discuss Emily Bronte''s careful attention to a rigid timeline and the role of the novel as a sober historical document. How is this significant, particularly in light of the turbulent action within? What other contrasts within the novel strike you, and why? How are these contrasts important, and how do they play out in the novel?

3. 	Do you think the novel is a tale of redemption, despair, or both? Discuss the novel''s meaning to you. Do you think the novel''s moral content dictates one choice over the other?

4. 	Do you think Bronte succeeds in creating three-dimensional figures in
Heathcliff and Cathy, particularly given their larger-than-life metaphysical passion? Why or why not?

5. 	Discuss Bronte''s use of twos: Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange; two families, each with two children; two couples (Catherine and Edgar, and Heathcliff and Isabella); two narrators; the doubling-up of names. What is Bronte''s intention here? Discuss.

6. 	How do Mr. Lockwood and Nelly Dean influence the story as narrators? Do you think they are completely reliable observers? What does Bronte want us to believe?

7. 	Discuss the role of women in Wuthering Heights. Is their depiction typical of Bronte''s time, or not? Do you think Bronte''s characterizations of women mark her as a pioneer ahead of her time or not?

8. 	Who or what does Heathcliff represent in the novel? Is he a force of evil or a victim of it? How important is the role of class in the novel, particularly as it relates to Heathcliff and his life?

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