Gilead

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Gilead

by Marilynne Robinson

Picador USA | January 31, 2006 | Trade Paperback

Gilead is rated 4.25 out of 5 by 4.
Twenty-four years after her first novel, "Housekeeping," Marilynne Robinson returns with an intimate tale of three generations from the Civil War to the twentieth century: a story about fathers and sons and the spiritual battles that still rage at America''s heart. Writing in the tradition of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman, Marilynne Robinson''s beautiful, spare, and spiritual prose allows "even the faithless reader to feel the possibility of transcendent order" ("Slate"). In the luminous and unforgettable voice of Congregationalist minister John Ames, Gilead reveals the human condition and the often unbearable beauty of an ordinary life.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 247 pages, 8.18 × 5.62 × 0.66 in

Published: January 31, 2006

Publisher: Picador USA

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 031242440X

ISBN - 13: 9780312424404

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Really enjoyed this It is 1964 in South Carolina. When Lily was only 4 years old, her mother was killed and she thinks she did it by accident, but she doesn't remember the details. Now, she's 14 and has had to live with her abusive father since her mother died. When she and their housekeeper, Rosaleen, a black woman, get into trouble with the law, Lily manages to break Rosaleen out of jail and they run away and find a woman (August) and her sisters in another town to stay with, while they help with the housework and August's beekeeping. I really liked this, although the end was a little unrealistic, I thought. I really enjoyed some of the secondary characters. I'm actually finding I don't have a lot else to say about the book. Was really good, though.
Date published: 2012-08-15
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A ponderous preachy read John Ames believes he is at the end of his life and starts to write a letter/diary to his 7 year old son. His grandfather, a preacher, had moved from Maine to Kansas and joined up with the Union side during the Civil War. His father, also a preacher, on the other hand was a pacifist and became estranged from his father. The grandfather eventually died on his own in the Wilderness. I found this book to be disjointed and maybe that is the intention as this is a series of entries in a dairy. Also the book was extremely preachy and rambling. These might have been because the writings are of a preacher and an elderly one at that. However, it made for a ponderous read
Date published: 2011-06-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I Hate When This Happens ... Gilead is a series of letters written by Reverend John Ames, for his son. Ames, who is seventy-six years old, has learned he is dying of heart disease and knows that he does not have much longer to live. And yet, he feels there are some things he wants to impart to his seven-year-old son; lessons on life, so to speak. Now, you may think it odd that a seventy-six-year-old man has a seven-year-old son; however, when my Grampa was born in 1913, his father was seventy-two years old. Could you imagine having an infant in your care at the age of seventy-two? I can barely cart around an almost-four-year-old at the age of almost-fourty-one ... In the Bible, "Gilead" means hill of testimony or mound of witness, (Genesis 31:21), which describes the very essence of this book. It is a testimony of John Ames and his thoughts and his values. Gilead is also the name of the town in which Ames has resided his entire life and it is very much at the heart of the story. Although John Ames writes the papers as a way of communicating to his young son, he uses them as makeshift confessional for himself as well. He is able to express the loneliness he experienced after his first wife died ... to reveal, and therefore relieve himself of the anger he feels toward his father ... and to declare his love for his wife and young boy ... to explore his relationship with his namesake, John ("Jack") Ames Boughton, who is his best friend's wayward son. This is the 16th book I read in a challenge to read 100 books in one year ... and I'm blogging as I go. About lots of things ... Check out all my thoughts on Gilead ... http://takenoutofcontext-jill.blogspot.com/2010/03/i-hate-when-this-happens.html
Date published: 2010-03-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from An Endearing Tale This story takes place in the sixties and revolves around a 14 year girl, Lily who lost her mother at an early age. She has to endure growing up with a bitter abusive father whom she decides to runs away from after a racial event with her nanny-housekeeper. The tale takes her to a home of three beekeeping sisters where Lily's gains insight about her own life and the people around her. This is wonderful story about the times of the sixties and sisterhood. Truly enjoyed and one of my best reads for 2009. Would recommended to anyone who enjoys tales about how a person's experiencescan shape one's life.
Date published: 2009-10-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it! I read this after reading Home - fascinating to read a completely independent and completely related take on the same time, characters and facts. I'd recommend any reader read both.
Date published: 2009-07-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Secret LIfe of Bees by Sue Kidd (Book Review) The Secret Life of Bees by Annette Dunlea Set in the 1960’s US in a time of racial tensions Lily narrates her coming of age tale. Lily flees her abusive father and the police with her nanny Rosaleen to find more of her mother’s history. She goes to live with the three calendar sisters who have a profound influence on her life. August adopts her as a daughter and helps her to forgive herself and love others. It is a celebration of family and motherhood. Vivid description and enchanting characters record Lily’s journey to womanhood in a Kidd’s unique southern voice. Reviewed by Annette Dunlea author of Always and Forever and The Honey Trap
Date published: 2009-05-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great book This book is one of the greatest books I have ever read. The way it deals with political and social problems of the 60's and still tells an amazing story is incredible. You will fall in love with each of the characters one by one and at the end of the book you will want more of their lives. This book will become and remain a classic novel for a long time.
Date published: 2009-03-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from AMAZING!!! Ok so I hadnt heard of this book before I saw the ad for the movie and because books are usually better than the movie I decided I would read the book before I watched the movie. The book is amazing and I cant wait to see the movie. I would defidently recommend this book to anybody!
Date published: 2008-10-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The most beautiful book I've read in years This is the most beautifully written book I've read in years. Normally I devour books in one sitting, but this one I read in short spurts in order to saviour the beauty of the writing. Granted it is demanding reading, with a lot in the way of philosophical musings, but if you are hungry for beautiful language and for deep thoughts about life and meaning, this is definitely a book to read.
Date published: 2006-06-27

– More About This Product –

Gilead

by Marilynne Robinson

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 247 pages, 8.18 × 5.62 × 0.66 in

Published: January 31, 2006

Publisher: Picador USA

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 031242440X

ISBN - 13: 9780312424404

From the Publisher

Twenty-four years after her first novel, "Housekeeping," Marilynne Robinson returns with an intimate tale of three generations from the Civil War to the twentieth century: a story about fathers and sons and the spiritual battles that still rage at America''s heart. Writing in the tradition of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman, Marilynne Robinson''s beautiful, spare, and spiritual prose allows "even the faithless reader to feel the possibility of transcendent order" ("Slate"). In the luminous and unforgettable voice of Congregationalist minister John Ames, Gilead reveals the human condition and the often unbearable beauty of an ordinary life.

About the Author

Marilynne Robinson is the recipient of a 2012 National Humanities Medal, awarded by President Barack Obama. She is the author of Gilead, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Home, winner of the Orange Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and a finalist for the National Book Award. Her first novel, Housekeeping, won the Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award. Robinson's nonfiction books include When I Was a Child I Read Books, Absence of Mind, and The Death of Adam. Her novels Mother Country and Lila, were nominated for a National Book Award.

Editorial Reviews

"At a moment in cultural history dominated by the shallow, the superficial, the quick fix, Marilynne Robinson is a miraculous anomaly: a writer who thoughtfully, carefully, and tenaciously explores some of the deepest questions confronting the human species. . . . Poignant, absorbing, lyrical...Robinson manages to convey the miracle of existence itself."--Merle Rubin, "Los Angeles Times Book Review" "Incandescent . . . magnificent . . . Ýa¨ literary miracle."--Lisa Schwarzbaum, "Entertainment Weekly" (A) "Rapturous . . . astonishing . . . "Gilead" is an inspired work from a writer whose sensibility seems steeped in holy fire."--Lisa Shea, "Elle" "Lyrical and meditative . . . potently contemplative."--Michele Orecklin, "Time" "Perfect."--Jeremy Jackson, "People"(four stars) "Major."--Philip Connors, "Newsday""" "You must read this book. . . . Altogether unlike any other work of fiction, it has sprung forth more than twenty years after "Housekeeping" with what I can only call amazing grace."--Anne Hulbert, "Slate""" "So serenely beautiful and written in a prose so gravely measured and thoughtful, that one feels touched with grace just to read it."--Michael Dirda, "The Washington Post"" ""There are passages here of such profound, hard-won wisdom and spiritual insight that they make your own life seem richer. . . . "Gilead" Ýis¨ a quiet, deep celebration of life that you must not miss."--Ron Charles, "The Christian Science Monitor"" """Gilead" is a refuge for readers longing for
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