A Streetcar Named Desire

by Tennessee Williams

January 1, 1981 | Mass Market Paperbound

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"A Streetcar Named Desire" is one of the most remarkable plays of our time. It created an immortal woman in the character of Blanche DuBois, the haggard and fragile southern beauty whose pathetic last grasp at happiness is cruelly destroyed. It shot Marlon Brandon to fame in the role of Stanley Kowalski, a sweat-shirted barbarian, the crudely sensual bother-in-law who precipitated Blanche''s tragedy.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 144 pages, 6.86 × 4.36 × 0.44 in

Published: January 1, 1981

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0451167783

ISBN - 13: 9780451167781

Found in: American, American
Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18

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Rated out of 5 by from Attempted to purchase this off your Yonge and Eglinton location but apparently it's unavailable which is nonsensical as your website offers it. Any other locations in the vicinity that carry this? I'd like my novel in hard cover.
Date published: 2012-06-25

– More About This Product –

A Streetcar Named Desire

by Tennessee Williams

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 144 pages, 6.86 × 4.36 × 0.44 in

Published: January 1, 1981

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0451167783

ISBN - 13: 9780451167781

From the Publisher

"A Streetcar Named Desire" is one of the most remarkable plays of our time. It created an immortal woman in the character of Blanche DuBois, the haggard and fragile southern beauty whose pathetic last grasp at happiness is cruelly destroyed. It shot Marlon Brandon to fame in the role of Stanley Kowalski, a sweat-shirted barbarian, the crudely sensual bother-in-law who precipitated Blanche''s tragedy.

About the Author

After O'Neill, Williams is perhaps the best dramatist the United States has yet produced. Born in his grandfather's rectory in Columbus, Mississippi, Williams and his family later moved to St. Louis. There Williams endured many bad years caused by the abuse of his father and his own anguish over his introverted sister, who was later permanently institutionalized. Williams attended the University of Missouri, and, after time out to clerk for a shoe company and for his own mental breakdown, also attended Washington University of St. Louis and the University of Iowa, from which he graduated in 1938. Williams began to write plays in 1935. During 1943 he spent six months as a contract screenwriter for MGM but produced only one script, The Gentleman Caller. When MGM rejected it, Williams turned it into his first major success, The Glass Menagerie (1945). In this intensely autobiographical play, Williams dramatizes the story of Amanda, who dreams of restoring her lost past by finding a gentleman caller for her crippled daughter, and of Amanda's son Tom, who longs to escape from the responsibility of supporting his mother and sister. After The Glass Menagerie,Williams wrote his masterpiece, A Streetcar Named Desire, (1947), along with a steady stream of other plays, among them such major works as Summer and Smoke(1948), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1954), and Suddenly Last Summer (1958). His plays celebrate the "fugitive kind," the sensitive outcasts whose outsider status allows them to pe
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From Our Editors

Noteworthy not only for its contribution to literature, A Streetcar Named Desire also catapulted Marlon Brando into the acting spotlight. His portrayal of Stanley Kowalski, an unrefined rogue bursting with sexual energy, brought Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize-winning words to life like no other. The relationship between Stanley and his wife's sister, Blanche DuBois, is tragic and intensely pathetic - especially considering the difference in background and Blanche's complete understanding of her brother-in-law. Intensely disturbing, but resonating with truth and realism, this play packs almost as much of an impact when read as when seen performed on the stage.

Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18