A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

by Charles Dickens
Introduction by Gillen D'arcy Wood, Gillen D'arcy Wood

Barnes & Noble Books | December 1, 2003 | Mass Market Paperbound

A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) is rated 4.2 out of 5 by 5.
A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
  • New introductions commissioned from today''s top writers and scholars
  • Biographies of the authors
  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader''s viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
  • All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader''s understanding of these enduring works.
     
    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times . . .” With these famous words, Charles Dickens plunges the reader into one of history’s most explosive eras—the French Revolution. From the storming of the Bastille to the relentless drop of the guillotine, Dickens vividly captures the terror and upheaval of that tumultuous period. At the center is the novel’s hero, Sydney Carton, a lazy, alcoholic attorney who, inspired by a woman, makes the supreme sacrifice on the bloodstained streets of Paris.

    One of Dickens’s most exciting novels, A Tale of Two Cities is a stirring classic of love, revenge, and resurrection.

    Gillen D’Arcy Wood received his Ph.D in English from Columbia University in 2000 and is currently an assistant professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of The Shock of the Real: Romanticism and Visual Culture, 1760–1860.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 464 pages, 6.75 × 4.13 × 1.16 in

Published: December 1, 2003

Publisher: Barnes & Noble Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1593080557

ISBN - 13: 9781593080556

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Real Classic Some times the word classic can be over used in our society, but not in the case of this book. This shows what can happen when crazy people are running the government, in any country, in any century. It does not matter if they call them selves communist, republicans, democrats, socialist, monarchist, if they are crazy enough your in trouble. And that's even more true if your poor. Charles Dickens does a great job of pointing this out. This is a book for all time periods. For example, this relates to Hitler in Germany of the 30's and 40's, as well as Russia under Stalin. See what I mean about crazy people running a government? Here's a little bit of trivia. This book was based on a nonfiction book, That Charles read about the French Revolution. Sorry, I do not remember the tittle of the book.
Date published: 2013-06-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Charles Dickens is one of the greatest writers ever lived. This was my first Dicken's novel and was convinced upon completion that it would not be my last. Having done some background reading on the French Revolution was very helpful as well as having an edition that provided endnotes to shed light on the many historical references and nuances that Dicken's masterfully places throughout the book. Without this help, I would not have have understood or experienced the full depth of this story or the message that Dicken's conveys which is one more concerned about the human response rather than the historical impact of the French Revolution. This is not an eaasy casual read. My reccomendation is to do your homework on the French Revolution, reread portions when necessary (don't skim),try to capture and understand the many nuances and references, and most of all savor the wonderful writing. Do this and you will be astounded with recognition of why Charles Dickens is one of the greatest writers ever lived.
Date published: 2009-09-06
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Ugh! Take your bourgeois thumb and stick it... A painful beast of a book. It took me five attempts to get past page one hundred, and when I finally did break that barrier I pressed on until the very end so that I didn't have to suffer ever again. Dickens is a problem for me. I admit it freely. There was a time, many years ago, when I was a fan. I read Great Expectations for the first time in grade four, and I was in love with the book and Dickens. And I imagine that some part of my social consciousness, which wasn't a gift from my parents, was planted with the seeds of Dickens. Over the years, though, Dickens and I have grown apart. I don't mean that I have "outgrown" him in any sort of condescending manner. It's not the sort of thing I expect anyone else to do, nor is it something that I blame fully on Dickens. No, we've grown apart as many couples do when one person changes through life and experience and the other remains constant. I have become a radical over the years, and Dickens...well, he's still as bourgeois left as ever, and we're not compatible any more. He venerates the comforts of the middle class; he expounds the virtues of law and order and charity; he attacks the indignities of the abuses of power but only offers imaginary methods for overcoming them, mythologizing the bourgeoisie's ability to overthrow the things that ail us; he vilifies those who seek more radical solutions; and, whether he admits it or not, he still believes in the superiority of nobility and noble blood. So when he starts to attack the revolutionaries in Paris and uses it to illustrate the "superiority" of civilized English behavior, when Dickens' moral soapbox weighs heavier than his plot, I begin to tune out of his lecture, and A Tale of Two Cities makes me increasingly angry from page to page. I recognize Dickens' talent. I still love his prose. And I get why people love this book, and maybe even why you do, kind reader, but I can't stand it (and I am finding it increasingly difficult to like any of his work anymore). I may burn this someday. But I have fully annotated the version I own and while I can burn the words of others (it's the radical in me), my lovely inner narcissist simply can't burn words of my own (unless it is for catharsis). So A Tale of Two Cities will likely survive on my shelf until I die, mocking me from its high perch in my office, whispering that a catharsis that may never come just may be necessary.
Date published: 2009-03-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Exceptional & Powerful It is a really moving story set during the French Revolution, which explores themes about human nature and second chances. Sidney Carton is an amazing and haunting character, who reminds you that although you know someone you never know what they are feeling on the inside. The book starts off a little slowly, but as it goes on it becomes engaging and very hard to put down. It reminds you what life is all about and also what people are capable of: great evil and great good. This version is presented in the original language as written by Dickens, and although a bit harder to understand than modern english, it really adds something to the vision. The ending is very powerful and will stick with you for a long time.
Date published: 2006-09-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Classic "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." This is the sentence that begins this fabulous book by Charles Dickens. Set during the French Revolution, two men are in love with the same woman. They look the same, but have two opposite personalities. The two men split up in order to get the girl of there dreams. Which one will convince Lucie, that he is the man for her?
Date published: 2006-08-02

– More About This Product –

A Tale of Two Cities (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

by Charles Dickens
Introduction by Gillen D'arcy Wood, Gillen D'arcy Wood

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 464 pages, 6.75 × 4.13 × 1.16 in

Published: December 1, 2003

Publisher: Barnes & Noble Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1593080557

ISBN - 13: 9781593080556

Read from the Book

From Gillen D''Arcy Wood''s Introduction to A Tale of Two Cities When Dickens expressed to A. H. Layard his fear of revolution in Britain in 1855, he only echoed many dozens of commentators over the preceding six decades, who wondered why mob violence could not simply cross the English Channel and turn the streets of London into a bloodbath of class retribution. The textbook historian''s answer points to the bloodless coup of 1688, the so-called Glorious Revolution, which saw the tyrant James II forced into exile, and William and Mary inaugurate a form of managerial rule in Britain, a constitutional, "mixed" monarchy where many absolute powers of the Crown were ceded to Parliament. With the consolidation of that legislative body, however unrepresentative, Britain''s nobility insured itself against the apocalyptic disaster that was to befall their French counterparts. The divergent tale of the two cities thus begins in 1688. But as a novelist, Dickens, who loved Paris and traveled there often, offers more intuitive, closely observed reasons for the untranslatable quality of that city''s Revolution. In an 1856 article for his weekly magazine, Household Words , he calls Paris "the Moon," and describes a culture of spectacle implicitly alien to his London readers. On the grand Parisian boulevards, Dickens watches the upper classes put on "a mighty show." Later, he takes coffee and a cigar at one of Paris''s ubiquitous cafés, and participates in a kind of collective voyeurism
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From the Publisher

A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
  • New introductions commissioned from today''s top writers and scholars
  • Biographies of the authors
  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader''s viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
  • All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader''s understanding of these enduring works.
     
    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times . . .” With these famous words, Charles Dickens plunges the reader into one of history’s most explosive eras—the French Revolution. From the storming of the Bastille to the relentless drop of the guillotine, Dickens vividly captures the terror and upheaval of that tumultuous period. At the center is the novel’s hero, Sydney Carton, a lazy, alcoholic attorney who, inspired by a woman, makes the supreme sacrifice on the bloodstained streets of Paris.

    One of Dickens’s most exciting novels, A Tale of Two Cities is a stirring classic of love, revenge, and resurrection.

    Gillen D’Arcy Wood received his Ph.D in English from Columbia University in 2000 and is currently an assistant professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of The Shock of the Real: Romanticism and Visual Culture, 1760–1860.

About the Author

Gillen D’Arcy Wood received his Ph.D in English from Columbia University in 2000 and is currently an assistant professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of The Shock of the Real: Romanticism and Visual Culture, 1760–1860.