Cryptonomicon

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Cryptonomicon

by Neal Stephenson

HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS | October 10, 2002 | Mass Market Paperbound

Cryptonomicon is rated 4.9 out of 5 by 20.
With this extraordinary first volume in what promises to be an epoch-making masterpiece, Neal Stephenson hacks into the secret histories of nations and the private obsessions of men, decrypting with dazzling virtuosity the forces that shaped this century.

In 1942, Lawrence Pritchard Waterhouse - mathematical genius and young Captain in the U.S. Navy - is assigned to detachment 2702. It is an outfit so secret that only a handful of people know it exists, and some of those people have names like Churchill and Roosevelt. The mission of Watrehouse and Detatchment 2702-commanded by Marine Raider Bobby Shaftoe-is to keep the Nazis ignorant of the fact that Allied Intelligence has cracked the enemy's fabled Enigma code. It is a game, a cryptographic chess match between Waterhouse and his German counterpart, translated into action by the gung-ho Shaftoe and his forces.

Fast-forward to the present, where Waterhouse's crypto-hacker grandson, Randy, is attempting to create a "data haven" in Southeast Asia - a place where encrypted data can be stored and exchanged free of repression and scrutiny. As governments and multinationals attack the endeavor, Randy joins forces with Shaftoe's tough-as-nails grandaughter, Amy, to secretly salvage a sunken Nazi sumarine that holds the key to keeping the dream of a data haven afloat. But soon their scheme brings to light a massive conspiracy with its roots in Detachment 2702 linked to an unbreakable Nazi code called Arethusa. And it will represent the path to unimaginable riches and a future of personal and digital liberty...or to universal totalitarianism reborn.

A breathtaking tour de force, and Neal Stephenson's most accomplished and affecting work to date, CRYPTONOMICON is profound and prophetic, hypnotic and hyper-driven, as it leaps forward and back between World War II and the World Wide Web, hinting all the while at a dark day-after-tomorrow. It is a work of great art, thought, and creative daring; the product of a truly icon

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 1168 pages, 6.75 × 4.19 × 1.9 in

Published: October 10, 2002

Publisher: HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0060512806

ISBN - 13: 9780060512804

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Cunningly twisted This novel twists historical facts and figures, with fantasy, and parallels to actual people and places. At times it is difficult to decrypt what is fact and what is fiction, what is truth and what is a false flag. The characters clearly have ancestors in other books by this author. The events also have vague parallels. In places the events foretell actual (read current) events. it all makes for a mind-bender of a novel. The math that's built in is fascinating. I knew (or thought I knew) plenty about codes and cyphers. I was aware of much of Turing's work and personal history. But the books paints some interesting pseudo-facts around him -- and others. It all makes for a long adventure over oceans, jungles, and secret labyrinths. The books is too heavy to be a 'can't put it downer' , but I certainly had to get through to the end -- even as the tale seemed to go off the rails at times. There's always a twist. Put simple: I really enjoyed this read.
Date published: 2015-01-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from "That darn book" I have recently discovered Neal Stephenson and enjoyed every paragraph of Cryptonomicon, my introduction to his work. I am not a "geek, mathematician, WW2 buff or computer person" but a reader of fiction, a lover of language and am fascinated by character development. That darn book completelyl distracted me from my usual routines and responsibilities and kept me chuckling and enthralled from the first chapter to the last paragraph. The rabbit trail about grandma, the maintenance of her car, and dividing her treasures between the kids and grandkids was worth the purchase price all by itself. Somehow Stephenson manages to tuck such gems into the book without distracting from the central stories at all. Quite a skill. I 'm going shopping for more books by this author. Now.
Date published: 2009-04-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great job Bobby Shaftoe! Alot of action, comedy, some history, and a little cyber-thriller thrown in for good measure pave the way for this novel to be one of my favourites. Neal Stephenson does use alot of metaphor, maybe too much for some people. I enjoyed how he was able to tell a story while peaking my interest in computers, presenting some history, making me laugh at times, making me feel bad at times. He was able to incorporate so much in to this 1100 page novel and keep me interested in almost every paragraph. This is a novel I certainly could read a second time. Does this help?
Date published: 2008-06-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Math was never so cool! Mixes history with a possible future were data is the new currency. Stephenson mixes math, history and mulitple character times lines in a really new and interesting way.
Date published: 2007-11-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Best action mystery I have ever read Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon is an gripping story that takes place over two timelines mixing espionage, treasure hunting, action and math. Thats right, math. The cryptonomicon's main premise is finding the lost Nazi and Japanese gold that was stolen during the second world war. This action packed novel will leave the reader at the edge of their seats and unable to put the book down.
Date published: 2006-07-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Not Stephenson's best This was, for the most part, a great book. The action was realistic and exciting. The author's ability to combine three novels into one was, admittedly, mind-blowing. I must admit that I was a little overwhelmed by its length, but it was a quick read. I thought, though, it could have been a couple hundred pages shorter. Yes, the characterization was rich, but Stephenson rambled at times. A better Stephenson read is Snow Crash
Date published: 2005-07-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from a keeper Despite it's length, it's a surprisingly brisk read. Very engaging characters and there are plenty of them. Way better than The Da Vinci Code.
Date published: 2004-08-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Well researched, well written I found myself constantly absorbed by this book. I spent my waking hours waiting to get the chance to get back to reading the book. Meticulous research, and an amazing writing style. I love this book.
Date published: 2004-06-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from wow! I read this one 2 months ago and have yet to be as entertained by the 5 or 6 books I have read since. Simply amazing!
Date published: 2003-09-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from How to think about 20 different subjects at once Love, love, love this book. Everytime I read it, it gets better. It's fantastic for people who enjoy using both their left and right brain. He explores so many topics at once but still keeps them all interesting and topical to the story lines. I found myself trying out math equations and becoming much more interested in the history of the modern world, and started to pay greater attention to world economics. For those who may find this book a little overwhelming, start with Diamond Age (which I did) or Snow Crash (He coined virtual reality ) and work your way to this book.
Date published: 2002-03-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from all over the place !! One of the craziest books I have read. It is all over the place describing how to eat cereal, going to the dentist, German U-boats, Marines, Nerds, Math Geeks etc... The miracle is that it all makes sense !! Those with an interest in all things internet and how computers got their start should read this, also anyone with the slightest interest in to how WWII was really won should delve into this. It is very long (900 plus pages) but well worth it. Highly recommended for anyone looking for something a little off the beaten track.
Date published: 2000-12-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Completes the Trilogy Although this books stands by itself as fascinating examination of the development of the computer, a mediation on the value of Information, and a rattling good read, the book fits nicely as the sequel to what I would call NS's Information Age trilogy: Cryptonomicon, Snow Crash, and The Diamond Age. For those of you who haven't read them all-- do it!
Date published: 2000-11-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Eerily Prescient In addition to being a gifted writer, Neal Stephenson seems to be able to predict the future. Part of Cryptonomicon is set in the near future (as of the time of writing), and much of the story is now coming true (witness Sealand and e-gold). This book has earned a special place in geek culture, and is worth a read for anyone interested in where technology is taking society. The portion of the book set in WWII may also be of great interest to history buffs, particularly those who are knowledgeable of encryption and Enigma (a cypher used by the Germans). In short, a great read. Cryptonomicon is fascinating both for its historical element and its persective on the future.
Date published: 2000-09-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Absolutely Incredible! I cannot say it enough, this is an incredible book! An intense storyline weaving through two generations, stretching from 1940's Britain and Germany, to present day Phillipines, with side trips to the US, Italy, Africa, Japan...The unpredictable plot ties together many diverse elements, and is completely unpredictable. Even more than the plot, this book serves as an excellent introduction to cryptography, information theory, WW2 history and computer hacking. Definately worth a read!
Date published: 2000-08-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An amazing hybrid. This is one of my favourite books, I've read it twice now. It's a great mix of WW2 and www, crypto, geek culture & romance. I did fell a little disappointment with the ending, but the rest is brilliant; funny, powerful, tragic. Some of the 'tangents' Stephenson goes off on are amongst the funniest things I've read.
Date published: 2000-05-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Mathematics and War Combine Its amazing to read this book and to see how big a role a few key persons play in the final outcome. Probably the best and surely the most confusing book I have ever read. The plot lines were at time a little difficult to follow. Best work of Stephenson I have ever read.
Date published: 1999-08-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Stephenson at his best Neal Stephenson, amazingly enough, manages to outdo all of his previous works with Cryptonomicon, a novel dealing with geek culture, cryptography, mathematics and WW2. Well-paced, fascinating, witty, often funny, Cryptonomicon reads like a sci-fi book but is really a well-constructed fiction. If you're a geek, mathematician, WW2 buff or computer person, then I cannot recommend this book highly enough.
Date published: 1999-07-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from FAU5T Absolutely wonderful! Private Ryan With PGP only much better than you could wish for ...I recommend this beauty to all prospective MCSE candidates and to members of the CSE! Your only as good as your passphrase! All Hail Eris! All Hail Discordia!
Date published: 1999-07-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Crypto and paranoia mix well Plain and simple, this book is 2 books in 1. Book 1 is set in WWII, book 2 is set NOW. In each book we have our heroes: Waterhouse and Shaftoe. Between the 2 books we see how the past will always influence the future and sometimes, the answer is very much in the past. Great Book. Stephenson loves the english language and it shows.
Date published: 1999-06-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from At last, a bona fide gung-ho math meta-thriller For everyone who loved the idea of code-rings in cereal boxes, swallowed the crypto-pirate gimmick in Poe's The Gold-Bug, find Pynchon-esque hyperbole & paranoia often times closer to fact than fiction- this is a novel about twisting information into noise and back again, about language & thought tricky conversion into statistics, and about all the little snares and traps along the way. Tangentially, there is also the Army Life, undersea cable-laying, treasure-hunting, the familiar gargoyles of the digital biz, the political economics of stealth and countless other contemporaneous themes as well. Finally, it is at times irksomely compelling and horrifically happy-making.
Date published: 1999-05-26

– More About This Product –

Cryptonomicon

by Neal Stephenson

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 1168 pages, 6.75 × 4.19 × 1.9 in

Published: October 10, 2002

Publisher: HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0060512806

ISBN - 13: 9780060512804

From the Publisher

With this extraordinary first volume in what promises to be an epoch-making masterpiece, Neal Stephenson hacks into the secret histories of nations and the private obsessions of men, decrypting with dazzling virtuosity the forces that shaped this century.

In 1942, Lawrence Pritchard Waterhouse - mathematical genius and young Captain in the U.S. Navy - is assigned to detachment 2702. It is an outfit so secret that only a handful of people know it exists, and some of those people have names like Churchill and Roosevelt. The mission of Watrehouse and Detatchment 2702-commanded by Marine Raider Bobby Shaftoe-is to keep the Nazis ignorant of the fact that Allied Intelligence has cracked the enemy's fabled Enigma code. It is a game, a cryptographic chess match between Waterhouse and his German counterpart, translated into action by the gung-ho Shaftoe and his forces.

Fast-forward to the present, where Waterhouse's crypto-hacker grandson, Randy, is attempting to create a "data haven" in Southeast Asia - a place where encrypted data can be stored and exchanged free of repression and scrutiny. As governments and multinationals attack the endeavor, Randy joins forces with Shaftoe's tough-as-nails grandaughter, Amy, to secretly salvage a sunken Nazi sumarine that holds the key to keeping the dream of a data haven afloat. But soon their scheme brings to light a massive conspiracy with its roots in Detachment 2702 linked to an unbreakable Nazi code called Arethusa. And it will represent the path to unimaginable riches and a future of personal and digital liberty...or to universal totalitarianism reborn.

A breathtaking tour de force, and Neal Stephenson's most accomplished and affecting work to date, CRYPTONOMICON is profound and prophetic, hypnotic and hyper-driven, as it leaps forward and back between World War II and the World Wide Web, hinting all the while at a dark day-after-tomorrow. It is a work of great art, thought, and creative daring; the product of a truly icon

About the Author

With this extraordinary first volume in what promises to be an epoch-making masterpiece, Neal Stephenson hacks into the secret histories of nations and the private obsessions of men, decrypting with dazzling virtuosity the forces that shaped this century. In 1942, Lawrence Pritchard Waterhouse - mathematical genius and young Captain in the U.S. Navy - is assigned to detachment 2702. It is an outfit so secret that only a handful of people know it exists, and some of those people have names like Churchill and Roosevelt. The mission of Watrehouse and Detatchment 2702-commanded by Marine Raider Bobby Shaftoe-is to keep the Nazis ignorant of the fact that Allied Intelligence has cracked the enemy's fabled Enigma code. It is a game, a cryptographic chess match between Waterhouse and his German counterpart, translated into action by the gung-ho Shaftoe and his forces. Fast-forward to the present, where Waterhouse's crypto-hacker grandson, Randy, is attempting to create a "data haven" in Southeast Asia - a place where encrypted data can be stored and exchanged free of repression and scrutiny. As governments and multinationals attack the endeavor, Randy joins forces with Shaftoe's tough-as-nails grandaughter, Amy, to secretly salvage a sunken Nazi sumarine that holds the key to keeping the dream of a data haven afloat. But soon their scheme brings to light a massive conspiracy with its roots in Detachment 2702 linked to an unbreakable Nazi code called Arethusa. And it will represent t
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Editorial Reviews

"A hell of a read." (Wired)