Death with Interruptions

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Death with Interruptions

by José Saramago
Translated by Margaret Jull Costa

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt | October 1, 2008 | Hardcover

Death with Interruptions is rated 4.2 out of 5 by 10.
On the first day of the new year, no one dies. This of course causes consternation among politicians, religious leaders, morticians, and doctors. Among the general public, on the other hand, there is initially celebration-flags are hung out on balconies, people dance in the streets. They have achieved the great goal of humanity: eternal life. Then reality hits home-families are left to care for the permanently dying, life-insurance policies become meaningless, and funeral parlors are reduced to arranging burials for pet dogs, cats, hamsters, and parrots.
Death sits in her chilly apartment, where she lives alone with scythe and filing cabinets, and contemplates her experiment: What if no one ever died again? What if she, death with a smalld,became human and were to fall in love?

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 256 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 1 in

Published: October 1, 2008

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0151012741

ISBN - 13: 9780151012749

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from "We can't see ourselves unless we become free of ourselves" Reminiscent of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's "The Little Prince" and Paulo Coelho's "The Alchemist," this allegorical novella is a gem. It centers around a man who pleads for a boat to search for an unknown island. But how do you know of an unknown island if it is unknown, asks everyone who hears of the man's wishes? Such is the sweet tale José Saramago wrote with wry and wit, in sentences that run and accompanied with intricate illustrations of Peter Sís, about the journey towards one's dream. It may prove challenging, it may fail, but you might find something of worth, perhaps something even more, along the way. "Indeed, this is the way fate usually treats us, it's there right behind us, it has already reached out a hand to touch us on the shoulder while we're still muttering to ourselves."
Date published: 2011-02-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from pay attention! This book was difficult to stay focused on, but i still enjoyed the concept and hidden truths. To be perfectly honest i feel like i should read it again because i believe it would be easier the second time through, so all i can say is your gonna have to pay attention or else your gonna come out feeling like you missed something. good ending also.
Date published: 2010-04-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Read This Book and Fall in Love with death! OK, Death with Interruptions takes a few pages to get going, but once it does this novel is quirky, witty and profound, all at the same time. It explores what happens if death, personified as a woman, refrains from doing her job. No matter their circumstances, people simply do not die. Of course, there are implications for families of the aged, funeral directors, life insurance companies and “eventide homes” but the implications of eternal life do not appear as one might expect. Further, it is in human relationships, especially those of death herself, that the novel has its greatest appeal . . . but I don’t want to give away the ending. Read it and enjoy it.
Date published: 2009-10-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A True Master Saramago proves once again why he is the Master. This particular offering revolves around a man named Tertuliano Maximo Aphonso and his discovery of another man who is his double and his search to meet this man. The story is told in true Saramago style, with character's dialogue separated only by commas, for example. It is easy to get attached to the main character and the people in his life, including Common Sense. The story does include an interesting twist at the end. The Double is a great read, one ofmy favorites from this fantastic author.
Date published: 2009-05-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The same great Saramago One more masterpiece from Saramago; once you discover his style, you just fall in love with it and find simple phrasing a bit boring. The subject in "The Double" is not new in world's literature but Saramago just knows to make it original in his own way.
Date published: 2008-04-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing!! Don't be discouraged by first 50 pages! Since I read Blindness by Jose Saramago, I have been on the lookout for more of his works. Blindness is one of my favourite books and one that I think everyone should read at some point in their life. These works are translated from Portuguese and Saramago has a Nobel prize for his literary works. Tertuliano Maximo Afonso is a history teacher with depression. In hopes of making him feel better, his colleague recommends a comedic movie. Afonso rents this movie, doesn't think too highly of it, and goes to sleep. In the middle of the night, he wakes up with an odd feeling. The movie is playing on his tv and someone that looks exactly like him is acting as the hotel receptionist in the movie. These two don't just look like each other - they are identical. Even their voice is exactly the same. Afonso sets to find out who this man is. When he finally tracks him down, the two engage in a tale of bitterness, revenge, happiness, and finding out who they really are. True to Saramago style, the novel is written with very few paragraphs and periods. All conversations are separated only by a comma. It takes a while to get into this and is difficult to read at first, but don't let this stop you from finishing any of Saramago's works! While I felt that part of the books had been dragged out a bit - for example, there were too many conversations with "common sense" - all that was completely forgiven by the incredible ending! One doesn't really expect twists except in mystery novels, so I was completely shocked by this one! Wow! One of the best-ended books I've ever read!
Date published: 2008-04-10
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Awful.... highly disappointing Disappointing to say the least. I read (ie. suffered) through over 100 pages of this book and finally could take no more. I was extremely disappointed because I love Jose Saramago's work and have read 4 of his previous novels. I was expecting another great novel. The premise is very interesting in that the main character is watching a video and see's an actor who looks, speaks and acts like him. However the book is filled with the author talking to the reader about points which do nothing but drag on the story, which after 100 pages could have been summed up in about 10-15 pages. HIGHLY disappointing! Read Blindness instead.
Date published: 2005-09-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Challange to Start Moving This little book will change almost all who read it. It is the story of a man who dreams of finding an unknown island. Though many laugh at him, his conviction leads others to believe and take risks. Reminiscent of Paulo Coelho's, The Alchemist, this is a story about following your dreams, and hoping for the best. About learning to not give up and press forward, even through failure and difficulties. Though it is just 64 pages, it will have a deep impact on your heart and spirit. Your dreams will reawaken and maybe you too will be challenged to start forward in pursuing them.
Date published: 2002-05-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Brilliant The Stone Raft is good enough to restore ones faith in the power of literature. Jose Saramago seems to have remembered that the basis of any great novel is the story. And this is a great story. One day, the Iberian Peninsula shears off from the European continent and begins to drift across the Atlantic Ocean. A diverse group of Portugese and Spaniards wander across the "island" searching for answers as to why this has occured. What they find are the answers to many important and difficult questions. Fortunately, the "point" of the story never gets in the way of what is a great adventure. Touching, gripping, eye opening and hugely entertaining, this is one of the best novels I have read in years.
Date published: 2000-07-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A great bedtime story I loved this book. In fact, as I waited for my husband, I began reading this book in a Chapters store and couldn't put it down. I bought it even though I finished reading it. It will make a great bedtime story when I have children to read it to...
Date published: 2000-02-08

– More About This Product –

Death with Interruptions

by José Saramago
Translated by Margaret Jull Costa

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 256 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 1 in

Published: October 1, 2008

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0151012741

ISBN - 13: 9780151012749

Read from the Book

The following day, no one died. this fact, beingabsolutely contrary to life''s rules, provoked enormous and, in the circumstances, perfectly justifiable anxiety in people''s minds, for we have only to consider that in the entire forty volumes of universal history there is no mention, not even one exemplary case, of such a phenomenon ever having occurred, for a whole day to go by, with its generous allowance of twenty- four hours, diurnal and nocturnal, matutinal and vespertine, without one death from an illness, a fatal fall, or a successful suicide, not one, not a single one. Not even from a car accident, so frequent on festive occasions, when blithe irresponsibility and an excess of alcohol jockey for position on the roads to decide who will reach death first. New year''s eve had failed to leave behind it the usual calamitous trail of fatalities, as if old atropos with her great bared teeth had decided to put aside her shears for a day. There was, however, no shortage of blood. Bewildered, confused, distraught, struggling to control their feelings of nausea, the firemen extracted from the mangled remains wretched human bodies that, according to the mathematical logic of the collisions, should have been well and truly dead, but which, despite the seriousness of the injuries and lesions suffered, remained alive and were carried off to hospital, accompanied by the shrill sound of the ambulance sirens. None of these people would die along the way and all would disprove the most
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From the Publisher

On the first day of the new year, no one dies. This of course causes consternation among politicians, religious leaders, morticians, and doctors. Among the general public, on the other hand, there is initially celebration-flags are hung out on balconies, people dance in the streets. They have achieved the great goal of humanity: eternal life. Then reality hits home-families are left to care for the permanently dying, life-insurance policies become meaningless, and funeral parlors are reduced to arranging burials for pet dogs, cats, hamsters, and parrots.
Death sits in her chilly apartment, where she lives alone with scythe and filing cabinets, and contemplates her experiment: What if no one ever died again? What if she, death with a smalld,became human and were to fall in love?

About the Author

JOSÉ SARAMAGO (1922-2010) was the author of many novels, among themBlindness, All the Names, Baltasar and Blimunda,andThe Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis.In 1998 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Editorial Reviews

PRAISE FOR JOSÉ SARAMAGO

"Saramago is arguably the greatest writer of our time . . . He has the power to throw a dazzling flash of lightning on his subjects, an eerily and impossibly prolonged moment of clarity that illuminates details beyond the power of sunshine to reveal."-Chicago Tribune "Reading the Portuguese writer José Saramago, one quickly senses the presence of a master."-The Christian Science Monitor