Detroit: An American Autopsy

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Detroit: An American Autopsy

by Charlie Leduff

Penguin Publishing Group | January 28, 2014 | Trade Paperback

Detroit: An American Autopsy is rated 4 out of 5 by 2.
An explosive exposé of America’s lost prosperity—from Pulitzer Prize­–winning journalist Charlie LeDuff
 
Back in his broken hometown, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Charlie LeDuff searches the ruins of Detroit for clues to his family’s troubled past. Having led us on the way up, Detroit now seems to be leading us on the way down. Once the richest city in America, Detroit is now the nation’s poorest. Once the vanguard of America’s machine age—mass-production, blue-collar jobs, and automobiles—Detroit is now America’s capital for unemployment, illiteracy, dropouts, and foreclosures. With the steel-eyed reportage that has become his trademark, and the righteous indignation only a native son possesses, LeDuff sets out to uncover what destroyed his city. He beats on the doors of union bosses and homeless squatters, powerful businessmen and struggling homeowners and the ordinary people holding the city together by sheer determination. Detroit: An American Autopsy is an unbelievable story of a hard town in a rough time filled with some of the strangest and strongest people our country has to offer.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 pages, 8.39 × 5.45 × 0.81 in

Published: January 28, 2014

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0143124463

ISBN - 13: 9780143124467

Found in: Biography and Memoir

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Really liked the writing I enjoy books written by journalists, for example, Jon Krakauer. I like their economical, active writing. LeDuff is a journalist and his prose is short, snappy and memorable. I would describe his writing as social realism, comparable to Daniel Woodrell's fiction, but without Woodrell's poetry. I found his personal memoirs reminiscent of Andre Dubus III's in 'Townie'. I began this book the day before Detroit filed for bankruptcy and was not surprised by the announcement. LeDuff had already performed the autopsy on the corpse. I gave the book 4 stars. I knocked off a star because the story is so bleak. I stopped reading the book because it was so hopeless but I was drawn back because I could not resist LeDuff's storytelling. If you enjoyed "Into Thin Air" by Krakauer, "Winter's Bone" by Woodrell or "Townie" by Dubus, you will enjoy "Detroit: An American Autopsy" by LeDuff.
Date published: 2013-07-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A great but sad read! Charlie Leduff takes on a nightmare tour of a once great metropolis that has fallen on hard times. Each chapter is insightful and concise as a different person that makes up the good and bad of Detroit is profiled. The Motor City is gutted and one hopes that there are a few embers of drive to revitalize this once great town. This book is a reminder that no city is immune from the disease that killed Detroit - a cure is needed for our urban centres. This book is a testament to great hardcore reporting from a fearless writer.
Date published: 2013-04-14

– More About This Product –

Detroit: An American Autopsy

by Charlie Leduff

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 pages, 8.39 × 5.45 × 0.81 in

Published: January 28, 2014

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0143124463

ISBN - 13: 9780143124467

Read from the Book

Prologue I reached down the pant cuff with the eraser end of my pencil and poked it. Frozen solid. But definitely human. “Goddamn.” I took a deep breath through my cigarette. I didn’t want to use my nose. It was late January, the air scorching cold. The snow was falling sideways as it usually did in Detroit this time of year. The dead man was encased in at least four feet of ice at the bottom of a defunct elevator shaft in an abandoned building. But still, there was no telling what the stink might be like. I couldn’t make out his face. The only things protruding above the ice were the feet, dressed in some white sweat socks and a pair of black gym shoes. I could see the hem of his jacket below the surface. The rest of him tapered off into the void. In most cities, a death scene like this would be considered remarkable, mind-blowing, horrifying. But not here. Something had happened in Detroit while I was away. I had left the city two decades earlier to try to make a life for myself that didn’t involve a slow death working in a chemical factory or a liquor store. Any place but those places. But where? I wandered for years, working my way across Asia, Europe, the Arctic edge working as a cannery hand, a carpenter, a drifter. And then I settled into the most natural thing for a man with no real talents. Journalism. It required no expertise, no family connections and no social graces. Furthermore, it seemed to be the only job that paid you to travel,
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From the Publisher

An explosive exposé of America’s lost prosperity—from Pulitzer Prize­–winning journalist Charlie LeDuff
 
Back in his broken hometown, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Charlie LeDuff searches the ruins of Detroit for clues to his family’s troubled past. Having led us on the way up, Detroit now seems to be leading us on the way down. Once the richest city in America, Detroit is now the nation’s poorest. Once the vanguard of America’s machine age—mass-production, blue-collar jobs, and automobiles—Detroit is now America’s capital for unemployment, illiteracy, dropouts, and foreclosures. With the steel-eyed reportage that has become his trademark, and the righteous indignation only a native son possesses, LeDuff sets out to uncover what destroyed his city. He beats on the doors of union bosses and homeless squatters, powerful businessmen and struggling homeowners and the ordinary people holding the city together by sheer determination. Detroit: An American Autopsy is an unbelievable story of a hard town in a rough time filled with some of the strangest and strongest people our country has to offer.

About the Author

Charlie LeDuff is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, formerly at the New York Times and the Detroit News, and currently on Detroit’s Fox 2 News. He is the author of US Guys and Work and Other Sins. He lives near Detroit.

Editorial Reviews

"LeDuff returns, by the books end, to the bar where his sister was last seen, only to find it unrecognizable. A black man outside explains the changes. ''they trying to put something nice up'' in this hellhole he says, speaking of the bar specifically, though his words spread across the city and pay tribute, in equal measure, to its dreamers, its pessimists and to those, resigned and wrung out, who love it despite all. ''Can''t say it''s working. But what you gonna do? You ain’t gonna be reincarnated, so you got to do the best you can with the moment you got. Do the best you can and try to be good.'' LeDuff has done his best, and his book is better than good." —Paul Clemens, New York Times Book Review "One cannot read Mr. LeDuff''s amalgam of memoir and reportage and not be shaken by the cold eye he casts on hard truths... A little gonzo, a little gumshoe, some gawker, some good-Samaritan— it is hard to ignore reporting like Mr. LeDuff''s." — The Wall Street Journal “Pultizer-Prize-winning journalist LeDuff ( Work and Other Sins ) delivers an edgy portrait of the decline, destruction, and possible redemption of his hometown… LeDuff writes with honesty and compassion about a city that’s destroying itself–and breaking his heart.” — Publishers Weekly, STARRED REVIEW “A book full of both literary grace and hard-won world-weariness …. Iggy Pop meets Jim Carroll and Charles Bukowski” — Kirkus “
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