Die Geschichte des Edgar Sawtelle: Roman

by Barbara Heller, David Wroblewski, Rudolf Hermstein

Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt | November 20, 2009 | Kobo Edition (eBook) | German

Die Geschichte des Edgar Sawtelle: Roman is rated 3.2051 out of 5 by 39.
Die Nummer 1 aus den USA!

Immer schon hat Edgar eine besonders enge Beziehung zu den Hunden gehabt, die seine Eltern auf ihrer Farm züchten. Nun ist er auf die Hilfe der Tiere angewiesen, als er eines Tages gezwungen ist, zu fliehen – vor seinem finsteren Onkel Claude. Edgar ist überzeugt davon, dass Claude seinen Vater ermordet hat …
Eine mitreißende Familiengeschichte und ein Abenteuerroman, der den dramatischen Kampf eines Jungen ums Überleben in der Wildnis vor einer atemberaubenden Landschaftskulisse schildert.

Edgar wächst auf einer abgelegenen Farm in Wisconsin auf, wo seine Eltern Gar und Trudy eine Hundezucht betreiben. Den hochsensiblen 14-Jährigen, der stumm zur Welt kam, verbindet eine enge Freundschaft mit den Tieren; die Hündin Almondine, seine treueste Kameradin, versteht sogar seine Zeichensprache. Eines Tages jedoch hat der Frieden ein Ende: Edgars Onkel Claude taucht auf und gerät wegen Erbstreitigkeiten mit Gar aneinander. Kurz darauf kommt Gar auf mysteriöse Weise ums Leben. Edgar ist überzeugt, dass Claude seinen Vater umgebracht hat, und flieht – nur begleitet von drei jungen Hunden, mit deren Hilfe er lernen muss, in der Wildnis zu überleben.

»Die Geschichte des Edgar Sawtelle« ist ein kluger, lebenspraller Roman über die großen Themen der Literatur: Rache und Schuld, Brudermord und Vaterverlust, Liebe und Hass. Ein zeitloses Epos und eine wahrlich unvergessliche Geschichte über die besondere Freundschaft zwischen einem Jungen und seinem Hund.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: November 20, 2009

Publisher: Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt

Language: German

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 3641037204

ISBN - 13: 9783641037208

Found in: Fiction and Literature

save 0%

  • Available for download
  • Not available in stores

$14.59  ea

$14.59 List Price


See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Edgar Sawtelle Edgar Sawtelle hears perfectly, but he can't speak. He uses sign to communicate with his family, a small circle of acquaintances, and the genetically gifted Sawtelle dogs in the kennel his family owns and operates. Edgar, his mother and father, and a wayward uncle live a story of playfulness, grief, manipulation, wandering in the wilderness, divination, hauntings, revenge, and plans gone awry. Published in 2008, this was a first novel for David Wroblewski. An Oprah endorsement sent the book to the best sellers list and prompted a long list of enthusiastic endorsements from well-known authors. Oprah is now producing a movie based on the book. Wroblewski is a skilled literary writer who crafts beautifully descriptive passages. He tells the story from the points of view of different characters, and he handles the transitions well. All the different voices ring true. The voice of Almondine, Edgar's closest dog friend, is particularly moving. Wroblewski is literary almost to a fault. Occasionally the writing veers into being so artsy as to be misunderstood: "During the night a white tide had swallowed the earth." What happened? What's kind of tide? He is evasive in action scenes when he should just tell us what happened:"The act itself took just an instant. When it was done he backed away . . ." What act? What happened? The reader has to pause for a second to try to figure things out and then keep reading to get context for what is going on. Despite the beauty of the writing, I found reading the book to be a bit of a slog. My hardcover copy has 562 pages. The story would have been more effectively told in 462. Wroblewski repeats detailed descriptions of dog training sessions, over and over. He might have done this to symbolically represent the everyday, repetitive nature of dog training. It works symbolically, but it clogs the arteries of the story movement. Wroblewski also leaves too many unanswered questions. He hints at events in the backgrounds of the main characters, but doesn't clarify them enough to satisfy. A little mystery and room for speculation is good, but . . . Often when a movie based on a book comes out, the book provides a fuller, richer version of the story. Readers of the book feel a little cheated by what has to be left out to fit the story into a movie format. In this case, the reverse is true. This story will benefit from being boiled down to its essence. And now that I've read the book, I look forward to seeing if the movie will hint at answers to some of those unanswered questions.
Date published: 2012-09-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Story of Edgar Sawtelle WOW what a great story, and the ending was one really big surprise, this book will keep you up until your done
Date published: 2011-09-16
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Hard to Rate I had heard so many great reviews in print, that I had to read this. It started off slowly, gained momentum *Spoiler* once Edgar runs away, but I hated the ending. It left me thinking "What was the point?" I would recommend this book to dog lovers, definitely, but more of a "borrow" than a "buy".
Date published: 2011-05-12
Rated 1 out of 5 by from A good editor can make it or break it! I'm not really sure how to rate this one. On one hand, the beginning was fairly decent, I was engaged with the story, it was moving forward. On the other hand, it completely fell off the tracks somewhere around the middle, and I checked out of the story completely. So, I didn't completely hate it, but, I can't honestly say it wasn't bad either... So there you have it!
Date published: 2011-03-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from High Literature with a Canine Twist There is so much to comment on from this novel that it's difficult to know where to start. It's Shakespeare's "Hamlet" in a kennel; it's a murder mystery and a ghost story; there's an element of the supernatural and magic realism throughout; it's a coming-of-age story set in America's geographic and historical heartland; it's so infused with dogs that they even become the narrative center of consciousness in a few chapters. But none of that actually does justice to this generous, literary, heartfelt text. The writing is remarkable, often bordering on poetic. The story is fast-paced too, so much so that I finished the last 150 pages in one sitting. For me, though, it was the human touch that really resonated --the bond between dogs and their people, the way families care for each other and sometimes let one another down, and how strangers can enter one anothers' lives and change everything from ordinary to extraordinary. At times, in fact, the literary quality of the novel gets in the way of how excellent the book really is. If you are familiar with "Hamlet" you'll recognize the ghostly father scene, the Oedipal issues and a "play within a play" unlike any other. The worst part about the "Hamlet" parallel is knowing what an unhappy ending Shakespeare's play promises, and hoping so much that Edgar doesn't meet the same fate. The novel demands attention; often, I let my mind wander --mostly to thoughts about my own dog-- and missed an important sentence or phrase, having to go back later and discover what I missed. Like all good poetry and integral writing, the narrative demands something back from us. In the end, though, THE STORY OF EDGAR SAWTELLE stands very well on its own. Maybe the novel could've used a bit of editing but I enjoyed the lush writing so much that I wouldn't omit a word. I'll never forget Edgar and his family, and especially Almondine, Henry, Essay, Tinder and Baboo. If Sawtelle dogs were real, I'd be first in line to buy an entire litter. If you like dogs and love great writing, give this novel a chance and stick with the longer, drawn-out parts. It's well worth reading and Edgar's story will stay in your heart long after the final page.
Date published: 2010-08-23
Rated 1 out of 5 by from What A Waste... ...of time. This may be one of the worst books I have ever read. It had no point, the writing was horrible and never did I give a damn about the characters. I would rather have a hangover for about a month than read a chapter of this book again.
Date published: 2010-08-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from For Those Who Want a Strong Story It appears that The Story of Edgar Sawtelle is subject to mixed reviews here. Those who loved it, I being one of them, were captivated by the characters and the movement of the plot. Those who remained unsatisfied upon finishing this novel seem to feel that nothing happened. I, personally, disagree. The Story of Edgar Sawtelle is essentially the story of Hamlet excet told...with dogs. Though I am not an avid fan of Shakespeare, I did quite enjoy Hamlet, and I felt that this story was a lovely reworking of the tale. Really, to be brief, The Story of Edgar Sawtelle begins slowly - a funeral march kind of slow. It steadily picks up speed as you approach the hundred-page mark, and somewhere - around page two hundred or so - it begins to gallop away at an extraordinary pace.
Date published: 2010-06-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great Read...until the last 100 pages A very well written book and, for the most of it, I had trouble putting it down at times. BUT...the ending was a let down for me. I would have given this book 4 stars, had it not been for the ending :( I was really into this book up until the point Edgar returned home. I feel like the ending left me hanging with a lot of unanswered questions.
Date published: 2010-04-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from no need to love dogs to love this book it was a slow start but could not put it down once I passed the quarter mark
Date published: 2010-04-09
Rated 1 out of 5 by from A Dogone let down Being a Huge fan of dogs, I could hardly wait to start reading this book after receiving it as a gift. The story line captivates, then lets down, goes no where and the characters lack in depth. I am half way through and am still waiting for something to take hold and make me want to keep reading.. It's a major struggle and I'm not sure if I'll make it to the end of the book. The reviews, Oprah's pick etc... well... more hype than anything!. I will not be passing this book along to my dog lover friends .. off to the charity shop it will go!
Date published: 2010-02-02
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Struggled Through This One I agree with Suzisunshine. It took everything I had to finish this book. The only reason I read it was because it was an Oprah pick. Learned my lesson there and haven't read one she has recommended since. Don't waste your time on this one. Very convoluted storyline that goes nowhere.
Date published: 2010-01-20
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Sad undertone What was this about anyways? I found it hard to get through, convoluted with too many details which do not enhance the storyline. Didnt' know where the author was going most of the time. Not sure what the message was in this book but I'm sorry I didn't bail half way through.
Date published: 2009-12-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Exceptional This book is a saga about the Sawtelles and their exceptional dogs. Dogs not of a particular breed but bred for their qualities of obedience, loyalty and intelligence. Edgar was born to Trudy and Gar,as a mute. He learned sign language to communicate but he has grown up with the dogs and little outside contact. His father gives him his own litter to raise and train. When Gar brings his brother, Claude into his home after his release from prison, the family is changed. Gar and Claude start to argue a lot and Edgar doesn't understand why. When Gar dies, Edgar knows he must learn everything that his grandfather and father knew about the dogs. But Claude is insinuating himself more and more into Edgar's and Trudy's lives. When Edgar tries to prove that Claude killed his father everything backfires and Edgar runs away. This is a coming-of-age, a mystery, an animal and family story. The scenes from the wilderness that the author portrays are so very real. By far my favourite part of the book is the narration by Almondine, Edgar's faithful companion dog. These chapters are poignant and beautifully written.
Date published: 2009-11-15
Rated 1 out of 5 by from ***Dont Waste Your Time**** You know, I can pretty much guarantee why this book went to become a top seller. It was because of Oprah and her obsession with her dogs. There is one section of the book where (without giving too much away) there is a touching moment between the boy and the dog he grew up with and I believe that ONE moment made the choice for Oprah. And of course there is no stopping the Oprah steam roller after that. Every adult in the book is either misguided to the point of stupidity or pure evil including the parents, uncle, doctor and others characters. No redeeming message to this story. A huge disappointment. The writer writes description very well and has clearly done the research regarding training dogs but so what- he had seven years to do it!. Beyond those two minimal characteristics the book did absolutely nothing for me. NoTHING. Save Your money.
Date published: 2009-11-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Riveting Tale It took me a bit to get interested, however it wasn't long until I had trouble to put it down. I have done nothing for several days but read. Mr. Wroblewski's insight into the raising of dogs is profound. His writing style has you capture the emotions of his characters including the dogs. Highly recommended.
Date published: 2009-11-08
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great story, though a little confusing at times Edgar Sawtelle lives with his parents in Wisconsin on a farm that sells Sawtelle dogs. Between Edgar, his dad Gar, and his mom Trudy, they manage to train the pups until they are ready for placement with families. Each one of the is responsible for a different part of the process. Edgar is a mute who communicates through his own form of sign language. The only one who seems to really understand Edgar is his dog Almondine. She has been his friend since birth and is always by his side. When Gar brings his brother Claude back to the farm after being released from jail, the dynamics change. Claude and Gar argue a lot and Edgar doesn't quite understand why. When Gar dies, it's up to Edgar to help keep the business alive and learn everything he can about his grandther's vision for the Sawtelle dogs. Claude starts moving in and taking Gar's place in the family which pushes Edgar to his limits. What results is a story of finding oneself in adversity and the journey required to get there. This book is divided in to different sections and within each you get the perspective of different characters. I really enjoyed Almondine's perspective. She is such a wise and loyal dog and it was amazing how she understood that Edgar couldn't communicate as soon as he was brought home. These chapters seemed like some of the most important ones in the novel. This novel was definitely a page-turner. Yet there were some passages that I didn't quite understand. At first I wasn't sure if it was because I was reading the book too quickly but I went back and re-read and still couldn't get a clear picture of things. Maybe the author left some of these items partially explained because he wanted the reader to use their imagination? I really enjoyed this book even though I hated some of the characters and didn't feel too good about where the book was going. But that's part of what makes a book so good I guess!
Date published: 2009-11-01
Rated 2 out of 5 by from well written but not engaging (to me at least) When B. pulled The Story of Edgar Sawtelle out of her bag at last month’s book club reveal there was a silent sigh of dismay. I know I felt it. Despite the fact that the book has garnered heaps of praise and was flying off the shelf at Indigo last summer, I had no desire to read it. When my friend said she was going to take it with her when she went to England with her mom I said: “Don’t do it; this book weighs a ton!” As it turned out, of the ten members of my book club I was (along with B.) the only person who read it. Er…finished it. One person got about half way through, a few others read 50-100 pages. The book is l-o-n-g…562 pages but lest you think I actually judge a book by its length, let me say that The Story of Edgar Sawtelle is very well written. I would have said that dog lovers would eat this book up- but this wasn’t the case with the dog lovers in my book club; none of them finished. It’s hard to put my finger on exactly why I didn’t love this book in the way most others have- well, the critics at least, who have compared this book to Shakespeare, an “American Hamlet” even (Mark Doty). The book concerns the Sawtelle family, parents Trudy and Gar and their son, Edgar, who is born mute. They live on a farm in Wisconsin where they breed dogs known as the ‘Sawtelle’ dogs, remarkable because they can read Edgar’s signs. When Gar’s younger brother, Claude, returns to the farm Edgar’s idyllic life starts to unravel and when his father dies suddenly, Edgar’s grief is palpable. As Claude grows closer to his mother and assumes more of a role on the farm, Edgar becomes obssessed with proving that Claude had something to do with his father’s death. Things don’t work out quite as Edgar plans though, and he leaves the farm, taking three ‘Sawtelle’ dogs with him. Eventually, though, he returns to the farm to confront his uncle – with dramatic results. (I actually thought the ending was spectacularly melodramatic.) Why do some books work and others not so much? I can’t fault Wroblewski’s writing. In some ways I felt like he jammed the book with every possible theme, like maybe this debut might mark the beginning and end of his literary career. Ultimately, though, there was just too much ‘dog talk’ – sits and stays and day-to-day kennel business that just wasn’t of interest to me and, in some ways, diluted the book’s larger themes of revenge and love. It wasn’t that I had a hard time reading the book…I just never really invested my heart in Edgar’s story
Date published: 2009-06-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Story of Edgar Sawtelle Edgar Sawtelle is born unable to make a sound, but he is able to hear and see and has a great intellect and a way with words. Crosswords pose no challenge for Edgar who has a vast vocabulary, which is an oxymoron for someone born mute. "The Story of Edgar Sawtelle" by David Wroblewski takes place on a dog breeding farm. Edgar helps his mother Trudy and his father Gar run the breeding program. Gar’s goal is to breed the ultimate dog and he spends many hours recording the canine’s pedigrees. Claude the younger brother of Gar eventually makes an appearance and competiveness and strife and deep past events scar their relationship. Claude is in possession of a poison that gives him a power he is unable to let go of, even though it frightens him. Gar is murdered by Claude and no one is aware of this except for Edgar. Trudy is devastated by the loss of Gar and Claude seems to replace him, much to Edgar's anguish. Edgar becomes involved in an unfortunate accident which leads to the death of the veterinarian and he flees home with three young dogs. Edgar finds his way to Henry who shelters him and helps him become strong enough to return home. The return home is not a happy reunion and as in Shakespeare's “Hamlet” the ending of the book is tragic. This story has shadows of "Hamlet" throughout it and it is an intriguing read. However, if you are not a big fan of the canine species this may not be the book for you. Having had a dog as a child I could relate to Edgar and understand the whole dog thing, but for those who have not had that experience all the dog parts may seem boring and long drawn out.
Date published: 2009-06-08
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Really uneven pace I should have trusted my usual instinct when it comes to Oprah's picks ... not usually in agreement with her. However the story about a mute boy and dogs drew me in. The books starts off great and you begin to form a connection with the characters and then it STOPS for a REALLY long time. If I had not paid full price for the hardcover, I probably would have quit on this book at this point. The author definitely loves his adjectives so it was exhausting to read about the pale grey pristine and smoky hazy lazy blah blah blah ... you get my point! It you fight your way through the middle section it picks up again. Not on the top of my list of recommendations.
Date published: 2009-06-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Still Speechless Im still not really over the ending of the book, I know it shouldn't have, but it really threw me for a loop. There are so many pros AND cons of this book. The characters came to life out of the pages, but sometimes they did things I found were completely out of character. The writing style was very good, and with some sentences I had to pause and re-read it again because it was such a well put phrase. Also, some parts dragged, while others flew at a pace where I couldn't put the book down. All in all, it was "alright" at the start, it snowballed the "excellent" from the middle to the end, and as for the ending, I STILL don't know what to think. IT was a book that, when I was done with it, I didn't have anything at all to say.
Date published: 2009-05-22
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Am I missing something? Although, at times, I found it hard to put this book down, overall I was very disappointed in it. At times it seemed to drag on with far too much detail about mundane facts and happenings and then not enough detail on more important things. If this review sounds like I am confused that's because I am. The story itself was good but the ending was so very disappointing I wish I hadn't read the book . . . I think . . . or maybe not???
Date published: 2009-04-15
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Is it me or the story does not make sense I didn't like it and I think the reason for that was too much expectations. The story was raved by Oprah as love story between animal and human. I found it too mystic, too unrealistic, long and confusing. Did not love it at all.
Date published: 2009-03-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Read This was a great book, character development was amazing. The story kept you wanting more. It was one of those books that I finished and said "that was a great book"!
Date published: 2009-03-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from awesome!! so descriptive, just stunning
Date published: 2009-02-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from good - but what a crappy ending I really didn't expect the book to end the way it did. I still liked the book, but would have liked it more if it ended differently
Date published: 2009-01-16
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Is it still good if someone else did it first and better? Did anyone notice that the significant part of the plot was lifted off Shakespeare’s Hamlet? This was essentially a crudely modeled book after that great work of literature with dogs added in and some random characters thrown in for good measure. I am not saying the writing wasn't good because it was generally pleasant but the story was hardly worthy of the kind of endorsement it has received. This book was a gift to me because I am a dog lover but quite honestly, I've read far better books on or with dogs. Over all, I'd rather read Hamlet for human emotional complexity and then Amazing Gracie for a nice dog book. If nothing else they both have flow and originality which this book really didn't possess.
Date published: 2009-01-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Brilliant 1st Book I have been a dog lover and owner my whole life, and while I have never owned a 'Sawtelle' dog, I have always surrendered to the unconditional love that only a dog can give. In the book the connection between a boy and his dog/s runs very deep. I became very attached to Edgar, and had to stop reading a couple of times because I was afraid of what might be around the next turn for him. There were a couple of parts of the book that left me thinking 'what the heck'. But overall for a first time author I thought it was outstanding.
Date published: 2008-11-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A wonderful mix of tales I listened to this story on unabridged audio from Random House Audio, and it was one of the more moving tales I've enjoyed this year. The story itself is focused around the titular Edgar, who is a boy born without a voice - who becomes aware of a viscous act, and is left without a way to tell the truth. The story has a mix of qualities that I found delightful. The inclusion of the Sawtelle Dogs (a kind of fictional breed) is wonderful, and in the way that 'The Art of Racing in the Rain' made me actually interested in car racing, this book had me interested in dog breeds, raising and training animals, and totally captivated by the fictional dogs themselves. I was surprised by the slight shift into the supernatural of the tale - but welcomed and enjoyed it. All in all, this was a fantastic story, with something to please lovers of many different types of literature. Certainly, I can see why Oprah picked it - the depth of characterization is lovely.
Date published: 2008-10-31
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Wonderful I read all kinds of books and am always looking for something different. This book was IT. The writing is insightful and I found myself with tears coming down my face at the end of this one. The chapters from the dog's point of view were so original I find myself seeing these wonderful animals in such a different way now. Highly recommended.
Date published: 2008-10-29
Rated 1 out of 5 by from What was Oprah thinking?? I was very inspired by Oprah to read this book. Especially being a dog lover, but I have to say that I HATED it! I loved Marley and Me and would recommend it in a heartbeat over this book.
Date published: 2008-10-26
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Dog gone story Edgar has an interesting life for a fourteen year old: he trains dogs with his parents, lives on a farm, and although he can hear perfectly, he can not speak a word. The return of his uncle throws his life into a Shakespearin tailspin. I found this book interesting, but not stunning, or even close to To Kill a Mockingbird, as many have compared it to. It passed the time, and I really liked the dog information, especially Almondine. However, read Marley and Me, or The Art of Racing in the Rain for a better story.
Date published: 2008-10-23
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good, but not amazing I had the fortune of receiving a copy of this book gratis a few months back at a book preview. Ill be honest, it was the Hamlet angle that piqued my curiosity, but I was definitely charmed by the canine element. In the past, I had always recommended Dean Koontz's Darkest Evening of the Year to dog lovers, as well as Marley and Me, but I feel this one supercedes both books in that respect. There are a lot of interesting ideas presented here regarding the raising and purpose of dogs (including the end goal of what the senior Sawtelles wished for their dogs in the long run). Dogs aside, its a book whose second half can be mapped to the Acts and Scenes of Shakespeare's Hamlet (I especially appreciate Almondine's contribution to it). Even NOT knowing Hamlet, you can still be drawn in by what happens on this dog farm. Unfortunately, beyond that, I don't see what is the big hype over the book. I had seen Oprah's show and read Stephen King's blurb, and am a bit flummoxed by their reactions. It may be the fact that I expected something new to be said with the old story.
Date published: 2008-10-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Extraordinary Debut Novel This is one of those rare novels that captures you from the very beginning and holds you enthralled to the very end. I found myself missing the characters, dogs included, as soon as I turned the last page. It has all elements of a great novel, suspense, mystery, and complicated relationships all wrapped up into a unique story that has the potential to become a modern classic. The writing flows beautifully and enables the reader to easily 'see' the story as it unfolds. It is astonishing that The Story of Edgar Sawtelle is David Wroblewski's debut novel and leaves no question that he is a truly gifted storyteller. I anxiously await his next novel.
Date published: 2008-10-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A bit surprised Oprah picked this book! Overall good read. Wasn't on any of my top ten lists, and took a long time to get into, but after it was all said and done, I did enjoy this book. It took some time for me to appreciate the story and what it was about. I am not sure that I would read it again, and it was a bit depressing, but ended as it should.
Date published: 2008-09-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Awesome Awesome
Date published: 2008-09-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Best book of 2008 This book has to be the best book I have read in 2008. I would also put it ( and I read a lot! ) as one of the top ten books I have ever read. Purchase this book you will not be disapointed!
Date published: 2008-08-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Smart and has dog content As a/the book hound I am particularly drawn to books that are about or have at least one dog character, but this book goes beyond that. With its intelligent re-working of the Hamlet story and some of the best dog characters that you will ever meet, Edgar Sawtelle is a great way to spend a few summer evenings.
Date published: 2008-07-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazing I loved every page of this book. Well done. Hard to imagine this is the authors first novel!
Date published: 2008-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from *Here* is a writer... ...and *here* is a novel. Chock-full of a love of language, a robust narrative style, but moreover, more importantly, here is an actual *story*, something rare on today's literary fiction landscape. 'Edgar Sawtelle' will appeal to those who love a good story, to those who love intriguing characters, and certainly to those who love dogs. Mr. Wroblewski's accomplishments with this, his début novel, is substantial. Equally so are Stephen King's glowing words, which, I find in reflection, say everything I might lavish on the author, leaving me to simply nod and pass along the book to loved ones, so that they too, might experience the enjoyment I did at reading 'The Story of Edgar Sawtelle'. Congratulations to the author on this storytelling achievement.
Date published: 2008-06-10

– More About This Product –

Die Geschichte des Edgar Sawtelle: Roman

by Barbara Heller, David Wroblewski, Rudolf Hermstein

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: November 20, 2009

Publisher: Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt

Language: German

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 3641037204

ISBN - 13: 9783641037208

From the Publisher

Die Nummer 1 aus den USA!

Immer schon hat Edgar eine besonders enge Beziehung zu den Hunden gehabt, die seine Eltern auf ihrer Farm züchten. Nun ist er auf die Hilfe der Tiere angewiesen, als er eines Tages gezwungen ist, zu fliehen – vor seinem finsteren Onkel Claude. Edgar ist überzeugt davon, dass Claude seinen Vater ermordet hat …
Eine mitreißende Familiengeschichte und ein Abenteuerroman, der den dramatischen Kampf eines Jungen ums Überleben in der Wildnis vor einer atemberaubenden Landschaftskulisse schildert.

Edgar wächst auf einer abgelegenen Farm in Wisconsin auf, wo seine Eltern Gar und Trudy eine Hundezucht betreiben. Den hochsensiblen 14-Jährigen, der stumm zur Welt kam, verbindet eine enge Freundschaft mit den Tieren; die Hündin Almondine, seine treueste Kameradin, versteht sogar seine Zeichensprache. Eines Tages jedoch hat der Frieden ein Ende: Edgars Onkel Claude taucht auf und gerät wegen Erbstreitigkeiten mit Gar aneinander. Kurz darauf kommt Gar auf mysteriöse Weise ums Leben. Edgar ist überzeugt, dass Claude seinen Vater umgebracht hat, und flieht – nur begleitet von drei jungen Hunden, mit deren Hilfe er lernen muss, in der Wildnis zu überleben.

»Die Geschichte des Edgar Sawtelle« ist ein kluger, lebenspraller Roman über die großen Themen der Literatur: Rache und Schuld, Brudermord und Vaterverlust, Liebe und Hass. Ein zeitloses Epos und eine wahrlich unvergessliche Geschichte über die besondere Freundschaft zwischen einem Jungen und seinem Hund.