Don't Turn Around

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Don't Turn Around

by Michelle Gagnon

HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS | August 27, 2013 | Hardcover

Don't Turn Around is rated 4.5 out of 5 by 2.

Sixteen-year-old Noa has been a victim of the system ever since her parents died. Now living off the grid and trusting no one, she uses her computer-hacking skills to stay safely anonymous and alone. But when she wakes up on a table in an empty warehouse with an IV in her arm and no memory of how she got there, Noa starts to wish she had someone on her side.

Enter Peter Gregory. A rich kid and the leader of a hacker alliance, Peter needs people with Noa''s talents on his team. Especially after a shady corporation called AMRF threatens his life in no uncertain terms.

But what Noa and Peter don''t realize is that Noa holds the key to a terrible secret, and there are those who''d stop at nothing to silence her for good.

Fans of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo will devour the story of Noa, a teen soul mate to Lisbeth Salander.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 320 pages, 8.63 × 6.25 × 1.11 in

Published: August 27, 2013

Publisher: HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0062102907

ISBN - 13: 9780062102904

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great for fans of Cory Doctorow Whoa. Well that was a hell of a fun ride. I miss reading books like these that are heavy in the hacking world. It was like a cross between Little Brother by Cory Doctorow and Person of Interest, both of which I highly enjoy. This book is smart and while I didn't understand all of the hacker jargon, I understood some of it and some of it was explained. However, because of the nature of these kinds of books that need quite a bit of explaining to get the point across, there was a lot of dialogue on how the characters would pull this off or there was explaining of how this certain hacking thing is done in the narration. It gets a bit much at times, but I also like that it isn't dumbing anything down for the reader. I am a huge fan of mysteries and thrillers, especially those that go through the process of how it all happens. And with this one, I really love the mystery and going on the journey with the characters to "save the world." This story actually scared me more than any horror novel, because of how real the possibility something like this would happen. I thought the characters were quite interesting, especially Penny and Risse. They make some hard choices later in the book and it's commendable of them for being decisive enough to make it. This book was a really fun read, especially if you love Cory Doctorow books and such.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love love love! Noa wakes up in a facility with a big long scar on her chest and once she realizes she’s being held prisoner in the city of Boston she escapes her tormentors. Running into fellow teenager and hacker Peter, they uncover a conspiracy so great that even help from the FBI is useless. Noa’s character is fiercely sharp and intelligent, and I can honestly say I love her character. She’s a survivor who took matters in her own hands and started to teach herself how to hack into systems so she can survive on her own. Noa isn’t as hard and as cold as she seems, because you are privy to her vulnerable more sensitive side in bits and pieces. Then there’s Peter who grew up in an affluent neighbourhood and gas had every advantage yet he his parents ignore him and basically abandon him. I kinda hated his father a lot. The things he said just made me incredibly mad. It was a large contrast seeing these two young lives, both broken in their own way. Both trying to make sense of how wrong society has influenced them. Don’t Turn Around is written in dual perspectives and I’ve always loved different point of views because it adds so much more dimension to the storyline. So fast-paced, I couldn’t stop reading. And there were just so many questions I needed to answer that my mind itself was racing to figure it all out. This book is for any techy geek or anyone interested in a mystery or even conspiracy. There’s a little bit ofhacking terminology like bricking which was a very interesting theory and most likely a realistic one. I loved this one and almost gobbled it up. I thought this was a standalone but I was happy to find out there were going to be more books after I finished reading the last page. This one is going into my favourites pile and one I would read over again to find out if I missed any clues of foreshadowing. Characters Great strong characters. Pacing/Length So fast I was flipping through the pages. Cover/Design Pretty interesting, but it could do a makeover to patch the actual plot. Plot Love love love! Overall, one of my favourites of the year and can’t wait for the next one!
Date published: 2013-05-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from CyberSociety…and some sex This novel is compelling reminder for a new generation of mid to older teens that every light casts a shadow, every benefit has a cost. Our increasing reliance on public and private collective authority means that we hand over ever more of our personal power in exchange for apparent security and a more manageable, less haphazard life. LITTLE BROTHER reads well. Though I appreciated the explanations of technical details and the occasional pleasantly pedagogical meanderings through postwar American social history, I wonder if less words may have been used to this end: the cyber/tech lingo and related permutations of plot weigh the story down somewhat, and at times pushed the limits of my patience. The brief essays presented at the book’s end are interesting and informative, a nice touch. The element of LITTLE BROTHER which rather spoiled the book for me regrettably comprises a sizeable chunk of our culture. It is almost inescapable in adult reading material and on screen, and is making its way relentlessly into teen and YA fiction resources. IT is explicit sex. Even when it occupies a relatively small portion of a book. IT has compromised many a novel for me, and when my daughter was younger than her current ripe old age of 15, it caused me to refrain from recommending to her attention several otherwise excellent books (perhaps the tables have turned now?). I wonder if it’s helpful to dwell on this. Maybe our hyper-sexualized ethos is just a symptom of a deeper, more primary problem which must be addressed first. But there will always be a more-underlying issue…we can only act where we find ourselves now, and hope that what we sow may chance upon a patch of receptive soil. What saddens me, and the reason I write this, is that I fear that increasing sexual indulgence and explicitness, the commodification and commercialization of sex, go hand-in-hand with a decline in the integrity of a society; that they reflect patterns throughout human history that form part of a downward spiralling and, ultimately, the dis-integration of civilizations. My daughter (at present not exactly a paradigm of patience) tells me that she tends to find children bothersome and often just plain annoying, and that she may well choose not to bear a child when she is older. In a way, this gives me a feeling of relief, because I find myself struggling to keep up my faith in, and hope for, humanity. (Though perhaps it’s not humanity that is the proper object of faith anyway…) Mr. Doctorow: your characters wonder, Who can be trusted? Surely, before all, they trust YOU not to spy on perhaps the most intimate experiences of their lives. They trust you, of all people, to respect their privacy—just as they rebel against government surveillance of their everyday lives. Authors: please do not make me a voyeuse! Take to heart what the ghostly protagonist in a story by Aidan Chambers has to say: I’m not one of those ghosts who go round peeping at friends they’ve left behind, enjoying the sight of them in all kinds of situations both public and private. (Personally, I think that’s as sick an occupation for a ghost as it is for a mortal.) (from Dead Trouble in GHOSTS THAT HAUNT YOU) Mercifully, in LB the inevitable consummation of said relationship is not graphically spelled out for us. Excellent writers learn how to employ understatement, subtlety, brevity, humour, distancing, mystery—in a word, tact—to represent, and honour, sexual intimacy. They do not betray the trust of their characters, nor that of their readers.
Date published: 2009-10-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from 1985 jr. Welcome the american distopia. Marcus lives in a post 9/11 world where security is the excuse for violating civil liberties. This only gets worse after a major terrorist attack on the san fran bay bridge. Marcus is a 17 year old hacker who is arrest by DHS for just being near a terrorist attack. His treatment at the hands of DHS and the major increase in the governmental access to personal information causes marcus to fight back. Peacefully of course. When the internet is monitored, he creates his own internet. When the cops start keeping profiles of citizens movement he scrambles citizen electronic ids. When the government starts censoring the news he publishes the truth. Any one who has watched the U.S. freedoms crumble under the patriot act will find the the novel eerily familiar. And a frightening vision of what could be.
Date published: 2009-06-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Could totally win the Hugo's this august, 'nuff said.
Date published: 2009-06-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sibling of "Nineteen Eighty Five" Little Brother is party about the way society runs under the careful watch of a government. Little Brother is partly about the dark side and illegal imprisonment. Little Brother is partly about the clever use of technology. On seeing the title, one is immediately reminded of George Orwell’s classic novel Nineteen Eighty Five where Big Brother is all powerful and watchful. Is Cory Doctorow suggesting that the forces of Little Brother are similar but to a lesser degree? Or is he simply writing the tale of a teenager who grows up as a techno-geek? Perhaps it’s a bit of both. Teens play an important role at times when society is corrupted. It is wrong for adults to say that teens are rebellious and that their thoughts and actions are reckless. Teens do in fact have credible opinions and are idealistic. Doctorow validates teens by making them heroes in this turbulent society where control is exercised and fear results. In fact rebellion can be good. Through first person narration, Doctorow develops the main character, Marcus Yallow, to be a highly influential leader. He has a sturdy belief that they should live in a freedom loving country, but his belief is stifled by the Department of Homeland Security. Consequently, he rebels in a very rousing and active way. In the end, he succeeds at gaining the attention and agreement of adults and put an end to the police state. Yes, teen rebellion can be a good thing. Today, sophisticated technology exists that enhances daily life. In Little Brother, Doctorow suggests that even though technology benefits every aspect of living, it certainly has its flaws. The domineering government uses technology to control its citizens. Cameras are at every corner street and track the travel patterns of the citizens. Doctorow uses explicit detail to describe each and every piece of technology in the world of Little Brother. On the other hand, the technology allows Marcus to use XNet which assembles an army of teens to rebel against the imposing government. In other words, technology empowers the heroes. A distinct sense of suspense is created when the government instills fear into its citizens. Doctorow once again relates it to society where there may be an illegal and inhumane prison just a mile off shore. The government would be very authoritative and no privacy would be considered. The police state which controls the citizens in Little Brother reminds me of present day prison camps such as Guantanamo Bay and those in war torn Afghanistan and Iraq. The way Little Brother is very similar to Nineteen Eighty Five strongly suggests the theme of censorship and Doctorow surely made it clear with all the evidences. No doubt, fear and imprisonment is the ultimate tool of a government to control its citizens. This book is undoubtedly one of the most suspenseful and arousing novel I have read. It reminds us of many moral attributes that we are blinded from. It is a book worth spending the time to reflect deeply about. Read it. Sleep with it. Dream about it. It’s a great book.
Date published: 2009-04-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Bit Heavy on the Message Little Brother was blurbed by the likes of Neil Gaiman and Scott Westerfeld. It's appeared on multiple best books of 2008 lists, received a ton of great reviews and is a contender for The Hugo Award for best novel. Marcus, a seventeen year-old hacker, is skipping school with three of his friends when Bay Bridge is blown up. In the chaos, he and his friends are mistaken for perpetrators and captured by the police. They are taken to an unknown location where they are interrogated for days. When they're finally released, Marcus is shocked to discover the methods police use to "prevent terrorism" (which often include taken away citizens' rights). He refuses to take this lying down-ultimately, deciding to take the problem into his own hands. He's a smart, technologically aware teen and soon he's found himself leading a following of people, devoted to exposing the government's misdemeanors. At first, I found the book engaging, informative (but still interesting) and hard to put down. However, subtle would not be the best word to describe the book. It's filled with paragraphs explaining technology (such as LARPing, gait-recognition software, etc.) and paragraphs that almost seem to lecture you. On one hand, I knew very little about the technology Marcus described and the way it was presented was easy to understand and in some cases, absolutely fascinating. But, on the other hand, those moments tended to take me out of the story. Sometimes I felt as if the book sacrificed a better-developed plotline and characters for the message. Still, the novel's an excellent way to spark a discussion-the exact discussion that needs to be had at a point where we all rely on technology so much (without fully understanding it) and how easy it would be for our rights to be taken away. Little Brother is also a coming-of-age novel. By the end of the novel, Marcus had made a lot of mistakes (and learned from them..most of the time), fallen in love and grown up. He's a smart, believable character just like the novel (in fact, the novel's premise is frighteningly realistic). Despite my problems with the book, I would definitely recommend reading i
Date published: 2009-04-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Little Brother XD This book was the best hackers book i have ever read. Well... its the only book, but it was really good! The book is about this guy named Marcus, a.k.a w1n5t0n, a.k.a M1ck3y. Marcus and his 3 friends get sent to a "prison" right after a terrorist attack, in San Fransico. Couple of weeks later they get released, except for one. Marcus decides to get back at the gouvernment for taking away everything he kept a secret/his dignity. Little Brother teaches you about hacking the right way, and how good our serveillous is in our country. Totally not a nerdy book! You just have funn reading about hacking, that in the end you want to start hacking yourself. XD
Date published: 2009-04-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from 1984 in 2010 This smart and sweet teen novel is narrated by Marcus, a 17-year-old who happens to be skipping school with friends on the day that terrorists attack San Francisco. Marcus and his friends, caught on the street and suspected of involvement in the attack, are imprisoned and interrogated. Marcus is released after a few days, but one of his friends remains missing. In the aftermath of the attack, freedoms are curtailed, surveillance is heightened, and fear of further attacks is used to quell public protest. As the Department of Homeland Security escalates its interventions, Marcus, who's seen what they can do to innocent civilians in the name of security, begins to fight back, first by organizing an informal network of hacked Xboxes immune to surveillance. The Xnet becomes a vector for political dissent, and Marcus finds himself one of the leaders of a new movement. The near-future scenario of this book is all too plausible and familiar, and the arguments around government monitoring of private information are presented intelligently and respectfully. Doctorow very clearly comes down on the side of individual privacy and freedom, but without dismissing the real fears and tragedies that lead people to comply with security measures. Marcus is a goofy, smart and believable character: he loves his parents but can't always stand them; his actions are sometimes brave and well-planned, and other times silly or impetuous. He's a good kid: smart, loyal and idealistic; he is also a normal kid, who occasionally drinks, has sex with his girlfriend, and skips class to play games. Marcus's enemies are adults, but adults aren't The Enemy; his parents and their friends become valuable allies, once Marcus gets over his unwillingness to confide in them. And while there is plenty of information, both technical and philosophical, for the reader to absorb, the novel is funny and whimsical enough that it rarely feels didactic. A climactic scene in which Marcus attempts to skip town under the cover of a live-action vampire role-playing game is both hilarious and terrifying. Highly recommended.
Date published: 2009-02-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wow! This is a must-read! It teaches you so much and makes you question things about technology that most people don't think about or just overlook. It makes you more aware about how the government (and companies) can track you through them, and shows we can't take our freedom for granted. Seventeen year old Marcus and his friends find themselves at the wrong place and time, caught up in the aftermath of a major terrorist attack on San Francisco and are apprehended by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and whisked away to a secret prison, which turns out to be on an island off the city. When the DHS finally releases them, except for his friend, Darryl, Marcus discovers that the city has changed and is now run like a police state. The DHS treats everyone like a terrorist, creating checkpoints and monitoring the activities of everyone. Marcus knows that the only way to get his city and friend back is to fight the DHS with all he's got, but how? He uses the Xnet, basically a system that uses the Internet through an Xbox but which the government doesn't have control over yet. (The novel explains this stuff way better than this of course.) Soon, more people are joining, but will the Xnetters, or "Little Brothers" be able to take down a government that's out of control? It was such a great book. I liked the useful descriptions about computer security and stuff (which was told in a way that you could understand) , the storyline, the lessons learned, and the characters, which I felt like you could really get into and relate.
Date published: 2009-02-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Xquisite Set in a near future world that is realistic and very well possible, this novel, which pays homage to George Orwell's 1984, features a wonderful plot filled with twists and turns, and engaging---Not to mention human---characters that just feel absolutely real. This book is the must read of the year.
Date published: 2008-12-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from 1984 for the 21st century This book was fantastic! I never really enjoyed 1984 when I read it but i understood the concepts and ideas behind the book. Little brother takes those ideas and applies them to the world post 9/11. It actually made me want to pull my computer apart and see what makes it tick. It also made me aware of how many of our day to day actions can be tracked and used for profiling. Seems that Orwell's message to stay ever vigilant and not let our governments take all power from its citizens is alive and well in this book. 11 out of 10
Date published: 2008-10-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from TImely and Relevant Little Brother could very well be the 21st century's Catcher in the Rye. In a world only narrowly removed from goose-stepping totalitarianism, Doctorow shows us not only how easy it would be to remove that last barrier, but what people can do to fight against monolithic, bureaucratic evil, one individual at a time. I've enjoyed all of Doctorow's works so far, but Little Brother is his most polished work to date. Marcus, the narrator, is a tech-savvy 17-year old, and he never talks down to his audience even while at his most instructive - no pedantry here. Althouth the book is marketed toward teens (the Tor Teen imprint is on the spine), it is easily the most entertaining book I've read so far in 2008, and is equally accessible for adults - although you might not be able to trust yourself entirely after reading it, especially if you're over 25. Rarely have I felt as emotionally involved in a novel, and I literally couldn't put it down - I began reading at 10pm, and didn't stop until finishing the acknowledgements at 6am the next morning. In a nutshell, and not to sound too melodramatic, this book is important: important if you care about freedom; important if you don't think Big Brother is out there; important if you think it's only those with things to hide that need to worry about increased scrutiny and illegal wire-tapping. If you care about the future we and our children will be living in, read this book.
Date published: 2008-05-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Recommended for everyone over 13y I've been trying for two days to come up with a more coherent review than "possibly the best book I've ever read!" -- and yet that about sums it up. There's something in here for just about everyone. Whether you're a techno-geek or a Luddite, the technology descriptions are written in easy-to-read and easy to understand terms. Marcus's narrative flows smoothly, providing asides in tones of "this is cool! let me tell you why" but never patronizing or condescending. It's a book about clever kids being clever, but still making mistakes and learning from them. It's a story about coming of age while the world is changing drastically around you. It's about learning what's worth fighting for, and how to fight against overwhelming odds. It's about trust -- in yourself, in your friends and family, in your country and government -- and what it takes to lose it and earn it. Most importantly - it inspires hope that big things can be changed, and that even small changes are worth making.
Date published: 2008-04-30

– More About This Product –

Don't Turn Around

by Michelle Gagnon

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 320 pages, 8.63 × 6.25 × 1.11 in

Published: August 27, 2013

Publisher: HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0062102907

ISBN - 13: 9780062102904

About the Book

After waking up on an operating table with no memory of how she got there, Noa must team up with computer hacker Peter to stop a corrupt corporation with a deadly secret.

From the Publisher

Sixteen-year-old Noa has been a victim of the system ever since her parents died. Now living off the grid and trusting no one, she uses her computer-hacking skills to stay safely anonymous and alone. But when she wakes up on a table in an empty warehouse with an IV in her arm and no memory of how she got there, Noa starts to wish she had someone on her side.

Enter Peter Gregory. A rich kid and the leader of a hacker alliance, Peter needs people with Noa''s talents on his team. Especially after a shady corporation called AMRF threatens his life in no uncertain terms.

But what Noa and Peter don''t realize is that Noa holds the key to a terrible secret, and there are those who''d stop at nothing to silence her for good.

Fans of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo will devour the story of Noa, a teen soul mate to Lisbeth Salander.

About the Author

Michelle Gagnon has been a modern dancer, a dog walker, a bartender, a freelance journalist, a personal trainer, and a model. Her bestselling thrillers for adults have been published in numerous countries and include The Tunnels, Boneyard, The Gatekeeper, and Kidnap & Ransom. This is her first novel for young adults.

Editorial Reviews

?A fast-paced, rip-roaring thriller for all ages.? (Harlan Coben, #1 New York Times bestselling author)