Emma (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Emma (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

by Jane Austen
Introduction by Steven Marcus

Barnes & Noble Books | April 15, 2004 | Mass Market Paperbound

Not yet rated | write a review
Emma, by Jane Austen, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
  • New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars
  • Biographies of the authors
  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
  • All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.

     

    Emma Woodhouse is a wealthy, exquisite, and thoroughly self-deluded young woman who has "lived in the world with very little to distress or vex her."

    Jane Austen exercises her taste for cutting social observation and her talent for investing seemingly trivial events with profound moral significance as Emma traverses a gentle satire of provincial balls and drawing rooms, along the way encountering the sweet Harriet Smith, the chatty and tedious Miss Bates, and her absurd father Mr. Woodhouse–a memorable gallery of Austen's finest personages. Thinking herself impervious to romance of any kind, Emma tries to arrange a wealthy marriage for poor Harriet, but refuses to recognize her own feelings for the gallant Mr. Knightley. What ensues is a delightful series of scheming escapades in which every social machination and bit of "tittle-tattle" is steeped in Austen's delicious irony. Ultimately, Emma discovers that "Perfect happiness, even in memory, is not common."

    Virginia Woolf called Jane Austen "the most perfect artist among women," and Emma Woodhouse is arguably her most perfect creation. Though Austen found her heroine to be a person whom "no one but myself will much like," Emma is her most cleverly woven, riotously comedic, and pleasing novel of manners.

    Steven Marcus is Professor of English and Comparative Literature and George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, and a specialist in nineteenth-century literature and culture. A fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Academy of Literary Studies, he has received Fulbright, American Council of Learned Societies, Guggenheim, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Rockefeller, and Mellon grants. He is the author of more than 200 publications.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 576 pages, 6.75 × 4.13 × 1.44 in

Published: April 15, 2004

Publisher: Barnes & Noble Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1593080891

ISBN - 13: 9781593080891

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Written in a lighter way, it should be taken lightly! The last of her novels published when she was alive, Jane Austen’s Emma depicts the life of this 21 year-old woman, who lives with her father assuming the role of mistress of the house. As one of the “belles” of Highbury she believes herself entitle to every of her fantasies, including matchmaking just about everyone. The long-time family friend Mr Knightley does not approve of all this, especially when it concerns the projects she has for the future of Harriet Smith or the fancy she takes to Mr Frank Churchill. But it seems that nothing is to stop her, except maybe love... I used to think this longest novel, the less of 2 evils when compared to Mansfield Park but I must admit that on the second reading, I like it less that I thought I originally did. Probably because of all the 6 novels, this one is the lightest of all in terms of its characters psyche. You do not need to as dig deep to understand the essence of Emma Woodhouse's character, as you would have with others. Everything is written on the surface, which is why I recommend you read it in a very light mood, a vacation mood. For more about this book and many more, visit my blog : ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
Date published: 2013-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it This is a timeless classic. A girl who has it all gets put in her place even though she is trying to improve other people's lives. Instead of letting the cards fall she tries to intervene and find things out about her own life.
Date published: 2011-05-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I was hoping for a bit more. Emma has no intention of ever marrying and she considers herself a very good matchmaker amongst her friends. Of course, she is not nearly as good a matchmaker as she thinks she is and manages to mess up a few times and she misses seeing things between people. I was hoping for more. I liked parts of it, but my mind wandered throughout a lot of the book, too. It seemed if the focus was on particular characters (Harriet, Frank Churchill, sometimes Mr. Knightley), it kept my attention a bit more. I was interested at the start and at the end, and when the aforementioned characters were involved in the storyline, but otherwise, I got a bit bored at times and couldn't always pay attention to it.
Date published: 2011-03-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Emma Emma Woodhouse is the main character of Jane Austen’s novel Emma. The novel concentrates mainly on Emma and her life. Throughout the novel, Emma exempts herself from marriage and romance in order to assert her independence. Of course by the end of the novel Emma herself decides to get married just like the other characters in this novel. Her reasons for not getting married are the fact that she is wealthy enough not to require a husband to support herself, and she is so attached to her father that she does not long to leave his house. Although convinced that she herself will never marry, she takes it upon herself to persuade Harriet Smith, a younger friend, into a potential gentleman's wife. She sets her sights on Mr. Elton, the vicar, one of Highbury's most eligible bachelors. She leads Harriet away from Robert Martin, a well-to-do farmer, who is infatuated by Harriet. Harriet rejects Martin's proposal and becomes infatuated with Mr. Elton under Emma's encouragement, but Emma's plans go wrong when Elton makes it clear that she herself is the true object of his affections. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading for lengthy period of times.
Date published: 2001-06-01

– More About This Product –

Emma (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

by Jane Austen
Introduction by Steven Marcus

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 576 pages, 6.75 × 4.13 × 1.44 in

Published: April 15, 2004

Publisher: Barnes & Noble Books

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1593080891

ISBN - 13: 9781593080891

About the Book

Emma Woodhouse is a wealthy, exquisite, and thoroughly self-deluded young woman who plots her way through provincial balls, drawing rooms, and a memorable gallery of Austen's finest personages. Every romantic scheme is steeped in Austen's delicious irony.
Stephen Marcus is a much-honored Professor Emeritus at Columbia University, and the author of more than 200 publications.

Read from the Book

From Steven Marcus's Introduction to Emma The first sentence of Emma is only less well known than the legendary opening of Pride and Prejudice. "Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her." The immediate effect of this statement is to stop us, we readers, in our tracks. It is also a heads-up or alert, signaling to us as the narrator's adherents and collaborators to step up the volume and fine-tune the attentiveness that we direct toward the page. It begins with a broadside of affirmations and modulates into a conclusion that intimates serious problems may exist in the offing. Emma is very good looking in a rather striking and forceful way (not pretty or, here, beautiful); she is intelligent and quick-witted; and she is more than affluent when it comes to material means. She takes pleasure as well in the amenities of an established place in which to live, the establishment being part of a settled order in which she also feels at home. And best of all, perhaps, she is blessed with a "happy" temperament or general tone of well-being. With all these fortunate and combined bestowals, is there anything else to ask for? Well, yes—since they amount, the narrator remarks without pausing, to no more than "seemed." The dubiety carried in that ironic reservation turns the sentence around and pre
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From the Publisher

Emma, by Jane Austen, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
  • New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars
  • Biographies of the authors
  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
  • All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.

     

    Emma Woodhouse is a wealthy, exquisite, and thoroughly self-deluded young woman who has "lived in the world with very little to distress or vex her."

    Jane Austen exercises her taste for cutting social observation and her talent for investing seemingly trivial events with profound moral significance as Emma traverses a gentle satire of provincial balls and drawing rooms, along the way encountering the sweet Harriet Smith, the chatty and tedious Miss Bates, and her absurd father Mr. Woodhouse–a memorable gallery of Austen's finest personages. Thinking herself impervious to romance of any kind, Emma tries to arrange a wealthy marriage for poor Harriet, but refuses to recognize her own feelings for the gallant Mr. Knightley. What ensues is a delightful series of scheming escapades in which every social machination and bit of "tittle-tattle" is steeped in Austen's delicious irony. Ultimately, Emma discovers that "Perfect happiness, even in memory, is not common."

    Virginia Woolf called Jane Austen "the most perfect artist among women," and Emma Woodhouse is arguably her most perfect creation. Though Austen found her heroine to be a person whom "no one but myself will much like," Emma is her most cleverly woven, riotously comedic, and pleasing novel of manners.

    Steven Marcus is Professor of English and Comparative Literature and George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, and a specialist in nineteenth-century literature and culture. A fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Academy of Literary Studies, he has received Fulbright, American Council of Learned Societies, Guggenheim, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Rockefeller, and Mellon grants. He is the author of more than 200 publications.

About the Author

Steven Marcus is Professor of English and Comparative Literature and George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, and a specialist in nineteenth-century literature and culture. A fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Academy of Literary Studies, he has received Fulbright, American Council of Learned Societies, Guggenheim, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Rockefeller, and Mellon grants. He is the author of more than 200 publications.