Great Ideas Decline Of The English Murder

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Great Ideas Decline Of The English Murder

by George Orwell

Penguin Uk | September 22, 2009 | Mass Market Paperbound

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In these timeless and witty essays George Orwell explores the English love of reading about a good murder in the papers (and laments the passing of the heyday of the ''perfect'' murder involving class, sex and poisoning), as well as unfolding his trenchant views on everything from boys'' weeklies to naughty seaside postcards. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives - and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 128 pages, 7.25 × 4.5 × 0.25 in

Published: September 22, 2009

Publisher: Penguin Uk

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0141191260

ISBN - 13: 9780141191263

Found in: Religion and Spirituality

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– More About This Product –

Great Ideas Decline Of The English Murder

by George Orwell

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 128 pages, 7.25 × 4.5 × 0.25 in

Published: September 22, 2009

Publisher: Penguin Uk

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0141191260

ISBN - 13: 9780141191263

From the Publisher

In these timeless and witty essays George Orwell explores the English love of reading about a good murder in the papers (and laments the passing of the heyday of the ''perfect'' murder involving class, sex and poisoning), as well as unfolding his trenchant views on everything from boys'' weeklies to naughty seaside postcards. Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives - and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.

About the Author

Eric Arthur Blair (George Orwell) was born in 1903 in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. The family moved to England in 1907 and in 1917 Orwell entered Eton, where he contributed regularly to the various college magazines. From 1922 to 1927 he served with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, an experience that inspired his first novel, Burmese Days (1934). Several years of poverty followed. He lived in Paris for two years before returning to England, where he worked successively as a private tutor, schoolteacher and bookshop assistant, and contributed reviews and articles to a number of periodicals. Down and Out in Paris and London was published in 1933. In 1936 he was commissioned by Victor Gollancz to visit areas of mass unemployment in Lancashire and Yorkshire, and The Road to Wigan Pier (1937) is a powerful description of the poverty he saw there. At the end of 1936 Orwell went to Spain to fight for the Republicans and was wounded. Homage to Catalonia is his account of the civil war. He was admitted to a sanatorium in 1938 and from then on was never fully fit. He spent six months in Morocco and there wrote Coming Up for Air. During the Second World War he served in the Home Guard and worked for the BBC Eastern Service from 1941 to 1943. As literary editor of the Tribune he contributed a regular page of political and literary commentary, and he also wrote for the Observer and later for the Manchester Evening News. His unique political allegory, Animal Fa
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