Indian Ernie: Perspectives on Policing and Leadership

by Ernie Louttit

Purich Publishing | November 22, 2013 | Trade Paperback

Indian Ernie: Perspectives on Policing and Leadership is rated 5 out of 5 by 3.
When he began his career with the Saskatoon Police in 1987, Ernie Louttit was only the city’s third native police officer. Indian Ernie, as he came to be known on the streets, here details an era of challenge, prejudice, and also tremendous change in urban policing. Drawing from his childhood, army career, and service as a veteran patrol officer, Louttit shares stories of criminals and victims, the night shift, avoiding politics, but most of all, the realities of the marginalized and disenfranchised.

Louttit spent his entire career (including as a Sergeant) patrolling the streets of Saskatoon’s west side, an area until recently beset by poverty, and terrible social conditions. Here, he struggled to bring justice to communities where the lines between criminal and victim often blurred. Though Louttit’s story is characterized by conflict, danger, and violence, he argues that empathy and love for the community you serve are the greatest tools in any officer’s hands, especially when policing society’s less fortunate.

While his story is based on his experiences in Saskatoon, it is equally applicable to the challenges faced in any community where marginalized people live. It is an exciting, passionate, easy to read, and highly accessible story aimed at a broad audience.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 192 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 in

Published: November 22, 2013

Publisher: Purich Publishing

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1895830788

ISBN - 13: 9781895830781

Found in: Social and Cultural Studies

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from This Book Fuels My Moral Compass I purchased this book a month ago and read it in one weekend. I did not want to put it down! My soul work will always be in healthcare with Canada's Aboriginal People, but this book is an applicable read for anyone on a professional or personal journey who need guidance resetting their internal compass. It's an exciting, haunting, humbling, raw, heartbreaking readers ride. The author has a gift of committing his experiences and feelings to paper so we can all share in his journey. I look forward to the movie or at least another book. Mee-way Cheryl Kizoff RN, Tiny, Ontario
Date published: 2015-03-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The book 'Indian Ernie' humbles me Just finshed the book. It is for anyone who wants to do more than just exist. It is about the rewards and costs of caring.
Date published: 2013-12-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A compelling story! “I have always wanted to be brave and to move without fear or doubt. Brave not only in deeds, but in spirit and belief.”  These are the opening words of Indian Ernie aka Ernie Louttit. Louttit uses his innate storytelling skills to draw the reader into the brutal world of policing. Right out of the gate, he takes you into a terrifying, heart-pounding scene from his early days as a young constable…a scene where his bravery was most surely put to the test.  His stories are written in a strong and authentic voice; compassionate, yet unflinchingly honest as he reveals the daily realities of police work, the challenges they face, the heartache and horrors they bear witness to each day and the emotional fallout (PTSD) many will have to contend with for the rest of their lives. He speaks of his personal challenges of being a native police officer on a predominantly white force and how his difficult childhood and years in the army prepared him for this role. He seeks, in his book, to share the lessons he has learned over the course of his life and career, particularly with regard to being an effective leader, lessons he has learned through trial and error. A natural teacher, he instructs young officers to lead by example and to love the community they serve and to never allow ego and arrogance to inform their decisions as a leader.  In his own career, he has had to challenge such leadership. Often thwarted by bureaucracy or apathy, he boldly challenged the status quo, sometimes fearing for his job, but bound by the strength of his convictions. His commitment and dedication is something to be applauded. He has stood up to racism and has made it his life’s mission to prove wrong the opinions of ignorant people who seek to keep marginalized people marginalized. Read this book if you are interested in a career in policing, if you are new to policing, if you are in any way involved with people living on the fringes of society or if you a human being on this planet. You will learn much from this gifted writer. Plato said, “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle.” Louttit believed this. He taught this. And in doing so, he left the Saskatoon Police Service a stronger and more compassionate organization.
Date published: 2013-12-15

– More About This Product –

Indian Ernie: Perspectives on Policing and Leadership

by Ernie Louttit

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 192 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 in

Published: November 22, 2013

Publisher: Purich Publishing

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1895830788

ISBN - 13: 9781895830781

From the Publisher

When he began his career with the Saskatoon Police in 1987, Ernie Louttit was only the city’s third native police officer. Indian Ernie, as he came to be known on the streets, here details an era of challenge, prejudice, and also tremendous change in urban policing. Drawing from his childhood, army career, and service as a veteran patrol officer, Louttit shares stories of criminals and victims, the night shift, avoiding politics, but most of all, the realities of the marginalized and disenfranchised.

Louttit spent his entire career (including as a Sergeant) patrolling the streets of Saskatoon’s west side, an area until recently beset by poverty, and terrible social conditions. Here, he struggled to bring justice to communities where the lines between criminal and victim often blurred. Though Louttit’s story is characterized by conflict, danger, and violence, he argues that empathy and love for the community you serve are the greatest tools in any officer’s hands, especially when policing society’s less fortunate.

While his story is based on his experiences in Saskatoon, it is equally applicable to the challenges faced in any community where marginalized people live. It is an exciting, passionate, easy to read, and highly accessible story aimed at a broad audience.