King Lear

by William Shakespeare

General Books LLC | May 20, 2014 | Trade Paperback

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Excerpt: ...against than sinning. Kent. Alack, bareheaded! Gracious my lord, hard by here is a hovel; Some friendship will it lend you ''gainst the tempest: Repose you there, whilst I to this hard house,- More harder than the stones whereof ''tis rais''d; Which even but now, demanding after you, Denied me to come in,-return, and force Their scanted courtesy. Lear. My wits begin to turn.- Come on, my boy. how dost, my boy? art cold? I am cold myself.-Where is this straw, my fellow? The art of our necessities is strange, That can make vile things precious. Come, your hovel.- Poor fool and knave, I have one part in my heart That''s sorry yet for thee. Fool. Singing.    He that has and a little tiny wit-      With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,-    Must make content with his fortunes fit,      For the rain it raineth every day. Lear. True, boy.-Come, bring us to this hovel. Exeunt Lear and Kent. Fool. This is a brave night to cool a courtezan.- I''ll speak a prophecy ere I go:-    When priests are more in word than matter;    When brewers mar their malt with water;    When nobles are their tailors'' tutors;    No heretics burn''d, but wenches'' suitors;    When every case in law is right;    No squire in debt nor no poor knight;    When slanders do not live in tongues;    Nor cutpurses come not to throngs;    When usurers tell their gold i'' the field;    And bawds and whores do churches build;-    Then shall the realm of Albion    Come to great confusion:    Then comes the time, who lives to see''t,    That going shall be us''d with feet. This prophecy Merlin shall make; for I live before his time. Exit. Scene III. A Room in Gloster''s Castle. Enter Gloster and Edmund. Glou. Alack, alack, Edmund, I like not this unnatural dealing. When I desired their leave that I might pity him, they took from me the use of mine own house; charged me on pain of perpetual displeasure, neither to speak of him,...

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 108 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.22 in

Published: May 20, 2014

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1153634503

ISBN - 13: 9781153634502

Found in: History

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King Lear

by William Shakespeare

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 108 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.22 in

Published: May 20, 2014

Publisher: General Books LLC

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1153634503

ISBN - 13: 9781153634502

From the Publisher

Excerpt: ...against than sinning. Kent. Alack, bareheaded! Gracious my lord, hard by here is a hovel; Some friendship will it lend you ''gainst the tempest: Repose you there, whilst I to this hard house,- More harder than the stones whereof ''tis rais''d; Which even but now, demanding after you, Denied me to come in,-return, and force Their scanted courtesy. Lear. My wits begin to turn.- Come on, my boy. how dost, my boy? art cold? I am cold myself.-Where is this straw, my fellow? The art of our necessities is strange, That can make vile things precious. Come, your hovel.- Poor fool and knave, I have one part in my heart That''s sorry yet for thee. Fool. Singing.    He that has and a little tiny wit-      With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,-    Must make content with his fortunes fit,      For the rain it raineth every day. Lear. True, boy.-Come, bring us to this hovel. Exeunt Lear and Kent. Fool. This is a brave night to cool a courtezan.- I''ll speak a prophecy ere I go:-    When priests are more in word than matter;    When brewers mar their malt with water;    When nobles are their tailors'' tutors;    No heretics burn''d, but wenches'' suitors;    When every case in law is right;    No squire in debt nor no poor knight;    When slanders do not live in tongues;    Nor cutpurses come not to throngs;    When usurers tell their gold i'' the field;    And bawds and whores do churches build;-    Then shall the realm of Albion    Come to great confusion:    Then comes the time, who lives to see''t,    That going shall be us''d with feet. This prophecy Merlin shall make; for I live before his time. Exit. Scene III. A Room in Gloster''s Castle. Enter Gloster and Edmund. Glou. Alack, alack, Edmund, I like not this unnatural dealing. When I desired their leave that I might pity him, they took from me the use of mine own house; charged me on pain of perpetual displeasure, neither to speak of him,...