Lazy Days

by Erlend Loe
Translated by Don Bartlett, Don Shaw

House Of Anansi Press Inc | November 9, 2013 | Hardcover

Lazy Days is rated 4 out of 5 by 1.

From the bestselling author of Doppler, a wry and very funny look at the pitfalls of human existence . . . and the charms of celebrity chef Nigella Lawson.

Aspiring playwright Bror Telemann loves all things British. His wife, Nina, loves everything German. So a family holiday at the foot of the Alps, south of Munich - which Bror believes to be the birthplace of Nazism - is bound to cause tension. Especially when Bror spends the whole time virtually stalking (and constantly fantasizing about) his greatest obsession, British chef Nigella Lawson.

Can Telemann continue to bear the pressure of his empty existence? Or will his long-suffering family be the first to snap?

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 224 pages, 7.25 × 4.5 × 0.74 in

Published: November 9, 2013

Publisher: House Of Anansi Press Inc

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1770894128

ISBN - 13: 9781770894129

Found in: Fiction and Literature

save 27%

  • In stock online

$15.16  ea

Online Price

$19.95 List Price

or, Used from $15.97

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

All available formats:

Check store inventory (prices may vary)

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Just another great lazy day! I would go as far to say I like "Lazy Days" more than "Doppler." Doppler was the outdoors man, who moves to the wilderness and bond with a moose, where Telemann is a theatre man with an unhealthy infatuation for Nigella Lawson. Doppler and Telemann are opposites, in the sense of one having more of a laissez-faire, countryside attitude, whereas the other being more obsessive in his urban leisures. The common thread is that both have unstable relationships with their spouses and kids, and that is the root for most of the unhinged yet insightful conversations, which mostly runs through this little book. They are loathsome, but boy, are they hilarious in their incongruous ways and wacky musings, that sometimes make me stop and, regrettably, nod in silence.
Date published: 2013-10-26

– More About This Product –

Lazy Days

by Erlend Loe
Translated by Don Bartlett, Don Shaw

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 224 pages, 7.25 × 4.5 × 0.74 in

Published: November 9, 2013

Publisher: House Of Anansi Press Inc

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1770894128

ISBN - 13: 9781770894129

From the Publisher

From the bestselling author of Doppler, a wry and very funny look at the pitfalls of human existence . . . and the charms of celebrity chef Nigella Lawson.

Aspiring playwright Bror Telemann loves all things British. His wife, Nina, loves everything German. So a family holiday at the foot of the Alps, south of Munich - which Bror believes to be the birthplace of Nazism - is bound to cause tension. Especially when Bror spends the whole time virtually stalking (and constantly fantasizing about) his greatest obsession, British chef Nigella Lawson.

Can Telemann continue to bear the pressure of his empty existence? Or will his long-suffering family be the first to snap?

About the Author

Erlend Loe was born in 1969 in Trondheim, Norway. He studied folklore, film studies, and literature before working as a newspaper critic, in a psychiatric hospital, and as a schoolteacher. He is the author of eight novels, including Doppler, which was named a Guardian Best Book, and six children's books, which have been translated and published in thirty-four countries. He lives in Norway.

Don Bartlett lives in Norfolk, U.K., and is the translator of, among others, Per Petterson and Jo Nesbø.

Don Shaw lives in Denmark and is the compiler of Danish-Thai dictionaries. He has previously collaborated with Don Bartlett on translations of novels by Roy Jacobsen and Jakob Ejersbo.