The Canterbury Tales: (original-spelling Edition)

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The Canterbury Tales: (original-spelling Edition)

by Geoffrey Chaucer
Introduction by Jill Mann
Notes by Jill Mann

Penguin UK (PB) | August 30, 2005 | Trade Paperback

The Canterbury Tales: (original-spelling Edition) is rated 5 out of 5 by 3.
At the Tabard Inn in Southwark, a jovial group of pilgrims assembles, including an unscrupulous Pardoner, a noble-minded Knight, a ribald Miller, the lusty Wife of Bath, and Chaucer himself. As they set out on their journey towards the shrine of Thomas a Becket in Canterbury, each character agrees to tell a tale. The twenty-four tales that follow are by turns learned, fantastic, pious, melancholy and lewd, and together offer an unrivalled glimpse into the mind and spirit of medieval England.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 1328 pages, 7.75 × 5 × 2 in

Published: August 30, 2005

Publisher: Penguin UK (PB)

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 014042234X

ISBN - 13: 9780140422344

Found in: Fiction and Literature
Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent! A great translation, it's easy to read and understand.
Date published: 2013-06-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Definately Entertaining! This edition of The Canterbury Tales is a great translation from the original middle english text. The stories in here will keep you entertained no matter your interests; from murder, to lechery and folktales, Chaucer's got it all!
Date published: 2006-07-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from CANTERBURY DELIGHTS Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" tells us more than mere pilgrims' tales. First, the Middle English of Chaucer's time makes us realise and appreciate the evolution of the English language. The irony, sarcasm, and wit of Pilgrim Chaucer as the Narrator delights the literary buds of our human intellect. Curious minds should take delight in learning about the social and moral fabric that are woven throughout each pilgrim's character and the tales that is spun by that pilgrim; that is the society of Chaucer's time. This is not a book that teaches you how to, say, fix a leaky faucet; this book is the reason why you should leave that leaky faucet, to be transported into another realm, which precedes and shares our time.
Date published: 2001-01-27

– More About This Product –

The Canterbury Tales: (original-spelling Edition)

by Geoffrey Chaucer
Introduction by Jill Mann
Notes by Jill Mann

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 1328 pages, 7.75 × 5 × 2 in

Published: August 30, 2005

Publisher: Penguin UK (PB)

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 014042234X

ISBN - 13: 9780140422344

Read from the Book

The Knight’s Tale 1 Introduction 1 The Knight’s Tale, which mostly takes place in ancient Athens, is the conflicted love story of two royal Theban cousins who love the same woman. Because “The Knight’s Tale” is by far the longest and most complex of the Canterbury Tales presented in this volume, a quick summary of the action of the four parts of the tale may help readers encountering it for the first time: Part I. On his way back to Athens with his bride, Hypolita, and his sister-in-law, Emily, Duke Theseus responds to the pleas of some grieving widows by defeating Creon, the tyrant of Thebes. Among the bodies of the defeated army, he finds near death the royal cousins Palamon and Arcite. Rather than kill them, Theseus takes them back to Athens and places them in prison. From their barred prison window, the two young men see the lovely Emily and both fall in love with her. Arcite after a time is released but banished from Athens on pain of death, while Palamon remains in prison. The two are envious of each other’s condition. Part II. Arcite disguises himself as a common laborer and comes back to Athens, where he gets a job working in Emily’s household. Meanwhile, Palamon escapes from prison, and the rival cousins chance to meet in a grove near Athens. While Palamon and Arcite are fighting a bloody duel, Theseus, Hypolita, and Emily, out hunting, by chance come upon them in a grove. At first angry, Theseus soon relents, sets both of hi
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Table of Contents

The Canterbury TalesAcknowledgments
Editor''s Note
Chronolgy
Introduction
Further Reading
Chaucer''s Language
A Note on the Tect
Abbreviations of the Canterbury Tales

The Canterbury Tales
Fragment I (Group A)

The General Prologue
The Knight''s Tale
The Miller''s Prologue and Tale
The Reeve''s Prologue and Tale
The Cook''s Prologue and Tale

Fragment II (Group B)

The Man of Law''s Prologue, Tale and Epilogue

Fragment III (Group D)

The Wife of Bath''s Prologue and Tale
The Friar''s Prologue and Tale
The Summoner''s Prologue and Tale

Fragment IV (Group E)

The Clerk''s Prologue and Tale
The Merchant''s Prologue, Tale and Epilogue

Fragment V (Group F)


The Squire''s Prologue and Tale
The Squire-Franklin Link, the Franklin''s Prologue and Tale

Fragment VI (Group C)

The Physician''s Tale
The Physicia-Pardoner Link, The Pardoner''s Prologue and Tale

Fragment VII (Group B)

The Shipman''s Tale
The Shipman-Prioress Link, The Prioress''s Prologue and Tale
The Prioress-Sir Thopas Link and Sir Thopas
The Thopas-Melibee Link and the Tale of Melibee
The Monk''s Prologue and Tale
The Nun''s Priest''s Prologue, Tale and Epilogue

Fragment VIII (Group G)

The Second Nun''s Prologue and Tale
The Canon''s Yeoman''s Prologue and Tale

Fragment IX (Group H)

The Manciple''s Prologue and Tale

Fragment X (Group I)

The Parson''s Prologue and Tale
Chaucer''s Retractions

Abbrviated References
Notes
Glossary

From the Publisher

At the Tabard Inn in Southwark, a jovial group of pilgrims assembles, including an unscrupulous Pardoner, a noble-minded Knight, a ribald Miller, the lusty Wife of Bath, and Chaucer himself. As they set out on their journey towards the shrine of Thomas a Becket in Canterbury, each character agrees to tell a tale. The twenty-four tales that follow are by turns learned, fantastic, pious, melancholy and lewd, and together offer an unrivalled glimpse into the mind and spirit of medieval England.

About the Author

Born in London to a wine merchant, Geoffrey Chaucer (c1340-1400) became a royal servant and travelled as a diplomat to France, Spain and Italy. As well as being famed for his translations, his own work includes Troilus and Criseyde, The Book of the Duchess and The Legend of Good Women. Jill Mann has been Professor Medieval & Renaissance English at Cambridge University, and most recently Notre Dame Professor of English. She is the author Feminizing Chaucer (2002), and co-editor (with Piero Boitani) of The Cambridge Companion to Chaucer (2nd edn. 2003). Jill Mann has been Professor Medieval & Renaissance English at Cambridge University, and most recently she was Notre Dame Professor of English. She is the author Feminizing Chaucer (2002), and co-editor (with Piero Boitani) of The Cambridge Companion to Chaucer (2nd edn. 2003).

Editorial Reviews

“A delight . . . [Raffel’s translation] provides more opportunities to savor the counterpoint of Chaucer’s earthy humor against passages of piercingly beautiful lyric poetry.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Masterly . . . This new translation beckons us to make our own pilgrimage back to the very wellsprings of literature in our language.” —Billy Collins

“The Canterbury Tales has remained popular for seven centuries. It is the most approachable masterpiece of the medieval world, and Mr. Raffel’s translation makes the stories even more inviting.”—Wall Street Journal

Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18