A Confession And Other Religious Writings

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A Confession And Other Religious Writings

by Leo Tolstoy
Translated by Jane Kentish, Jane Kentish

Penguin Publishing Group | January 5, 1988 | Trade Paperback

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Tolstoy’s passionate and iconoclastic writings--on issues of faith, immortality, freedom, violence, and morality--reflect his intellectual search for truth and a religion firmly grounded in reality. The selection includes "A Confession," "Religion and Morality," "What Is Religion, and of What Does Its Essence Consist?," and "The Law of Love and the Law of Violence."

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 240 pages, 7.75 × 5 × 0.5 in

Published: January 5, 1988

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0140444734

ISBN - 13: 9780140444735

Found in: Essays and Letters
Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18

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– More About This Product –

A Confession And Other Religious Writings

by Leo Tolstoy
Translated by Jane Kentish, Jane Kentish

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 240 pages, 7.75 × 5 × 0.5 in

Published: January 5, 1988

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0140444734

ISBN - 13: 9780140444735

Table of Contents

A Confession and Other Religious Writings Introduction
A Confession
What Is Religion and Of What Does Its Essence Consist?
Religion and Morality
The Law of Love and the Law of Violence
Explanatory Notes

From the Publisher

Tolstoy’s passionate and iconoclastic writings--on issues of faith, immortality, freedom, violence, and morality--reflect his intellectual search for truth and a religion firmly grounded in reality. The selection includes "A Confession," "Religion and Morality," "What Is Religion, and of What Does Its Essence Consist?," and "The Law of Love and the Law of Violence."

From the Jacket

Tolstoy’s passionate and iconoclastic writings--on issues of faith, immortality, freedom, violence, and morality--reflect his intellectual search for truth and a religion firmly grounded in reality. The selection includes "A Confession," "Religion and Morality," "What Is Religion, and of What Does Its Essence Consist?," and "The Law of Love and the Law of Violence."

About the Author

Count Leo Tolstoy was born on September 9, 1828, in Yasnaya Polyana, Russia. Orphaned at nine, he was brought up by an elderly aunt and educated by French tutors until he matriculated at Kazan University in 1844. In 1847, he gave up his studies and, after several aimless years, volunteered for military duty in the army, serving as a junior officer in the Crimean War before retiring in 1857. In 1862, Tolstoy married Sophie Behrs, a marriage that was to become, for him, bitterly unhappy. His diary, started in 1847, was used for self-study and self-criticism; it served as the source from which he drew much of the material that appeared not only in his great novels War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877), but also in his shorter works. Seeking religious justification for his life, Tolstoy evolved a new Christianity based upon his own interpretation of the Gospels. Yasnaya Polyana became a mecca for his many converts At the age of eighty-two, while away from home, the writer suffered a break down in his health in Astapovo, Riazan, and he died there on November 20, 1910.

From Our Editors

 

Despite all that made up Leo Tolstoy’s world - his success, his fine health, a wonderful wife, a large estate and many happy children - he suffered a quiet malaise. A Confession and Other Religious Writings is an autobiographical piece that, in its most cathartic moments, attempts to deal with the meaninglessness of life he was inexplicably feeling. Recording his depression and alienation from the world and his desire to place meaning on the simplest and most uncomplicated of things, Tolstoy embarked on a inner-journey that began his search for religion.

Appropriate for ages: 18 - 18