Sea And Sardinia

by D. H. Lawrence
Editor Mara Kalnins

Cambridge University Press | June 13, 1997 | Hardcover

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Written after the First World War when he was living in Sicily, Sea and Sardinia records Lawrence''s journey to Sardinia and back in January 1921. It reveals his response to a new landscape and people and his ability to transmute the spirit of place into literary art. Like his other travel writings the book is also a shrewd inquiry into the political and social values of an era which saw the rise of communism and fascism. On one level an indictment of contemporary materialism, Sea and Sardinia is nevertheless an optimistic book, celebrating the creativity of the human spirit and seeking in the fundamental laws which governed human nature in the past fresh inspiration for the present. This edition restores censored passages and corrects corrupt textual readings to reveal for the first time the book Lawrence himself called ''a marvel of veracity''.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 282 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.75 in

Published: June 13, 1997

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0521242754

ISBN - 13: 9780521242752

Found in: Fiction

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– More About This Product –

Sea And Sardinia

by D. H. Lawrence
Editor Mara Kalnins

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 282 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.75 in

Published: June 13, 1997

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0521242754

ISBN - 13: 9780521242752

Table of Contents

General editor''s preface; Acknowledgements; Chronology; Cue-titles; Introduction; Sea and Sardinia; Appendix; Explanatory notes; Glossary of selected Italian terms; Textual apparatus; A note on pounds, shillings and pence.

From the Publisher

Written after the First World War when he was living in Sicily, Sea and Sardinia records Lawrence''s journey to Sardinia and back in January 1921. It reveals his response to a new landscape and people and his ability to transmute the spirit of place into literary art. Like his other travel writings the book is also a shrewd inquiry into the political and social values of an era which saw the rise of communism and fascism. On one level an indictment of contemporary materialism, Sea and Sardinia is nevertheless an optimistic book, celebrating the creativity of the human spirit and seeking in the fundamental laws which governed human nature in the past fresh inspiration for the present. This edition restores censored passages and corrects corrupt textual readings to reveal for the first time the book Lawrence himself called ''a marvel of veracity''.

About the Author

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda , who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.