Sense and Sensibility

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Sense and Sensibility

by Jane Austen
Introduction by David Gates

Random House Publishing Group | January 9, 2001 | Trade Paperback

Sense and Sensibility is rated 3.7273 out of 5 by 11.
Published in 1811, Sense and Sensibility has delighted generations of readers with its masterfully crafted portrait of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood. Forced to leave their home after their father''s death, Elinor and Marianne must rely on making good marriages as their means of support. But unscrupulous cads, meddlesome matriarchs, and various guileless and artful women impinge on their chances for love and happiness. The novelist Elizabeth Bowen wrote, "The technique of [Jane Austen''s novels] is beyond praise....Her mastery of the art she chose, or that chose her, is complete."

This Modern Library Paperback Classics edition contains a new Introduction by Pulitzer Prize finalist David Gates, in addition to new explanatory notes.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 pages, 7.95 × 5.1 × 0.65 in

Published: January 9, 2001

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0375756736

ISBN - 13: 9780375756733

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 1 out of 5 by from no the best I love miss austen's works. But sadly to say this is not the best book I've read by her, but it is worth the read. It's a bit of a bore and is not the same slight comical lines and remarks as Emma or Pride & Prejudice.
Date published: 2013-08-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The most romantic of all Austen’s novels. The first of her published novels, Sense and Sensibility tells the story of Dashwood sister’s Elinor and Marianne who although basically penniless, are determined to move towards what they believe to be the perfect love. Marianne being thoroughly romantic and ardent in her vision is ready to die for love, but Elinor is more thoughtful and self-controlled and puts much more sense into it. They will each have to overcome grief and despair to achieve what they hope will be marital bliss. In my opinion, this first novel of Austen is by far her most romantic and depicts sisterly love in a beautiful way. Each time I read it, I can help but feeling for either of the sisters as they grow apart or closer in their quest for Edward Ferrars or John Willoughby. The whole novel is well plotted, not matter what some people have said about the unraveling of the love triangle that is Lucy Steele, Elinor and Edward. And even though every deadly romantic individual will hope for a happy ending in between Marianne and Willoughby, I find that her marrying sensible Colonel Brandon, although almost twice her senior, is much more suitable than her ending with Willoughby. For more about this book and many more, visit my blog at: ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
Date published: 2013-06-30
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Yawn Not the worst of the worst but a yawn... didn't get through it... too boring. It was the audio book version and listened to during the last half of a 13 and a half hour drive, so I may not be the best judge.
Date published: 2011-12-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Read! Something about this story made me love it. I think it was her sister's love affair in the background. I love that it didn't shadow over the main love affair but in a way complimented it. In true Austen Style she has a quiet and responsible character and a wild and outspoken one with Gentlemen at the ready.
Date published: 2011-05-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Classic! I quite enjoyed this book and am a fan of Jane Austen. Although some may find it boring you really need to get into it and read the first few chapters so you can get a picture and understanding of the characters and you will be drawn in!
Date published: 2010-11-23
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A new twist to Sense and Sensibility I’ve been considering getting one of Jane Austen book for a few years now but I never did so far. Yes I am honestly saying to you that I have never read one of her book before. When I had the opportunity of reviewing a new edition of Sense and Sensibility, I thought it was the perfect opportunity of revising this lack in my bookworm life. So as many of you probably know, this is the story of two sisters and their love ones. So I won’t expand on the story per say for this review since this is apparently a classic in English literature. Being French Canadian, I had not gotten to know Jane Austen in the past. But I am now and I am glad to have read one of her book. But I must be honest to say that at times, I was having trouble to understand the old English style of writing and reading. For example, when talking about the age of someone, they would say of me one and forty instead of forty-one. So I figure that part pretty easily. But other terminology and words were harder to understand. Well the insight edition will bring various notes throughout the reading of the book to help clarify what the reader comes upon. There are historical and cultural details and definitions from England in the early 1800s. I really like these as it helped me to picture and situate the culture of that time. There are also facts and tidbits from Austen’s life that parallel or illuminate the novel. This information was interesting but I suspect that die-hard fans of Austen would really enjoy them. The reader will also have access of references to Sense and Sensibility to today’s culture, unscientific ranking of the novel’s most frustrating characters, themes of faith drawn from the novel or Austen’s life as well as comments and asides on the book’s characters and plot. As I said previously, I am having some issues with the way it is written – old English style- but I also believe that a person shall make the effort of reading something out of her comfort zone once in a while. And this novel is definitively out of my own comfort zone. The story is a classic brought many times on TV and movie. The author is well known around the world. It is my duty as a woman who loves to read to get exposed to this kind of writing to expand my knowledge and my taste. So I pursue the reading every night and I discover a little bit more about the Dashwood sisters and their life in the 1800s in England. I find it interesting. Another thing that I particularly appreciate in this book is the fact that the reader will find a series of questions that are perfect of a book club. This review was possible because I received a copy of Sense and Sensibility from Bethany House.
Date published: 2010-03-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Book Review: Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen This fantabulous classic was part of my read for the Everything Austen Challenge. Due to my love for anything and everything Victorian, I can say that it was only natural that I’d fall in love with this timeless piece. This story of the very different Dashwood sisters and their clashing tastes in their choices of men to love, was endearing as well as very frustrating at times. Just when I thought the obvious about Colonel Brandon, Edward or Willoughby- the story took a different turn just to add to the intrigue of it all; classic Austen at its best. The story revolves around love-sickness, love-triangles, a marriage of convenience, age and love, differences of choices and opinions, wealth and social status, influence, family conflict, secret-filled pasts and ultimately…and appropriately so: sense and sensibility. I’m still not sure which of the sisters I concurred with the most; Elinor or Marianne... Austen brilliantly shifts us from one perception to the other while embracing both depending on the situation. Ultimately the girls’ reconciliation and love for eachother blends the disparities of state helping them come to terms with their own serenity. Love can then be found and accepted under a new light. Sense and Sensibility is a light read embedded with deeper meaning that brings comfort, peaks interest and offers a colourful variety of figures (the comical busy-body Miss Jennings is indeed very special!) On the whole, this read meshed excitement, passion, drama as well as ‘sagesse’ in the lives of two otherwise very ordinary ladies of the times. The book doesn’t skip a beat with essential meanings and turn of events within every paragraph- With this one, you won’t want to blink:) One can never get enough of elegantly written suspense-filled love twists and pangs. At least I can't- Loved it! -
Date published: 2009-08-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Simply the best! This delightful re-covered copy of the classic was given to me as a gift and I honestly can't think of a better gift. The story of Maryanne and Elinor is one of my all-time favourites. The Dashwoods have to move after Mr Dashwoods' death (the male child inherits); they move to a cottage on the property of a relative. It is here that Marianne meets two suitors - Colonol Brandon and Mr Willowby. Elinor had met Edward Ferrars (Fanny's brother) right before the move and is not sure if he likes her. The sisters both show their love in different ways......... Truly a classic!
Date published: 2009-05-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from More Depth Having seen and loved the Ang Lee movie with Emma Thompson's screenplay, I didn't know what the book would add. As usual, though, the book gives more depth to the characters and plot, and Willoughby's actions are more understandable, although still wrong. A few other changes, like a wife and children for Sir John Middleton, but overall, an enjoyable read. The character change in Marianne, from a vivacious to sedate, is such a departure that I find it hard to believe, broken heart, or not.
Date published: 2008-05-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Wicked in a Sophisticated Way For me, this is one of my favorites of all times. The sisters in the story are so very different, anyone can relate with one of them. This story will take you up and down on the wings of love and in the end, Austen skillfully ties the story in a nice bow. Enjoy!
Date published: 2006-06-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sense and Sensibilty EXCELLENT!!!!!!! Funny and charming.... romantic and sad... for all the family. I recomend the book then the movie with Kate Winslet. Such a excellent written screen play. I enjoyed it very much for the romantic at heart!!!!!!! enjoy! =)
Date published: 2000-02-28

– More About This Product –

Sense and Sensibility

by Jane Austen
Introduction by David Gates

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 pages, 7.95 × 5.1 × 0.65 in

Published: January 9, 2001

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0375756736

ISBN - 13: 9780375756733

About the Book

Published in 1811, Sense and Sensibility has delighted generations of readers with its masterfully crafted portrait of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood. Forced to leave their home after their father's death, Elinor and Marianne must rely on making good marriages as their means of support. But unscrupulous cads, meddlesome matriarchs, and various guileless and artful women impinge on their chances for love and happiness. The novelist Elizabeth Bowen wrote, "The technique of [Jane Austen's novels] is beyond praise....Her mastery of the art she chose, or that chose her, is complete."
This Modern Library Paperback Classics edition contains a new Introduction by Pulitzer Prize finalist David Gates, in addition to new explanatory notes.

Read from the Book

Sense and Sensibility, the first of those metaphorical bits of "ivory" on which Jane Austen said she worked with "so fine a brush," jackhammers away at the idea that to conjecture is a vain and hopeless reflex of the mind. But I''ll venture this much: If she''d done nothing else, we''d still be in awe of her. Wuthering Heights alone put Emily Brontë in the pantheon, and her sister Charlotte and their older contemporary Mary Shelley might as well have saved themselves the trouble of writing anything but Jane Eyre and Frankenstein . Sense and Sensibility , published in 1811, is at least as mighty a work as any of these, and smarter than all three put together. And it would surely impress us even more without Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815) towering just up ahead. Austen wrote its ur-version, Elinor and Marianne , when she was nineteen, a year before First Impressions , which became Pride and Prejudice ; she reconceived it as Sense and Sensibility when she was twenty-two, and she was thirty-six when it finally appeared. Like most first novels, it lays out what will be its author''s lasting preoccupations: the "three or four families in a country village" (which Austen told her niece, in an often-quoted letter, was "the very thing to work on"). The interlocking anxieties over marriages, estates, and ecclesiastical "livings." The secrets, deceptions, and self-deceptions that take several hund
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From the Publisher

Published in 1811, Sense and Sensibility has delighted generations of readers with its masterfully crafted portrait of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood. Forced to leave their home after their father''s death, Elinor and Marianne must rely on making good marriages as their means of support. But unscrupulous cads, meddlesome matriarchs, and various guileless and artful women impinge on their chances for love and happiness. The novelist Elizabeth Bowen wrote, "The technique of [Jane Austen''s novels] is beyond praise....Her mastery of the art she chose, or that chose her, is complete."

This Modern Library Paperback Classics edition contains a new Introduction by Pulitzer Prize finalist David Gates, in addition to new explanatory notes.

From the Jacket

Published in 1811, Sense and Sensibility has delighted generations of readers with its masterfully crafted portrait of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood. Forced to leave their home after their father''s death, Elinor and Marianne must rely on making good marriages as their means of support. But unscrupulous cads, meddlesome matriarchs, and various guileless and artful women impinge on their chances for love and happiness. The novelist Elizabeth Bowen wrote, "The technique of [Jane Austen''s novels] is beyond praise....Her mastery of the art she chose, or that chose her, is complete."
This Modern Library Paperback Classics edition contains a new Introduction by Pulitzer Prize finalist David Gates, in addition to new explanatory notes.

About the Author

Jane Austen was born in Steventon, Hampshire, on December 16, 1775. Her father, the Reverend George Austen, was rector of Steventon, where she spent her first twenty-five years, along with her six brothers (two of them later naval officers in the Napoleonic wars) and her adored sister, Cassandra. She read voraciously from an early age, counting among her favorites the novels of Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, and Fanny Burney, and the poetry of William Cowper and George Crabbe. Her family was lively and affectionate and they encouraged her precocious literary efforts, the earliest dating from age twelve, which already displayed the beginnings of her comic style. Her first novels, Elinor and Marianne (1796) and First Impressions (1797), were not published. The gothic parody Northanger Abbey was accepted for publication in 1803 but was ultimately withheld by the publisher. In 1801 the family moved to Bath, where for four years Austen was able to observe the fashionable watering place that would later figure prominently in her fiction. Austen was sociable in her youth, and was briefly engaged in 1802. Two years later she began work on The Watsons, a novel that remained unfinished. After the death of her father in 1805, she lived with her mother and sister in Southampton for a few years before moving with them to a cottage at Chawton in Hampshire. This would be her home for the rest of her life, and she wrote many of her novels in its parlor. She continued to revise her earlie
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Editorial Reviews

"As nearly flawless as any fiction could be."
—Eudora Welty

Bookclub Guide

1. 	Sense and Sensibility begins with a short history of Norland Park, the Dashwood family''s estate. We learn that the late owner has bequeathed the property to his nephew, Henry Dashwood, since he himself was unmarried and without children. Describe Henry Dashwood''s family. Who are its members? What is the dilemma that Henry''s wife and daughters encounter upon his death?

2. 	The novel tells the story of two sisters who at first appear to be more different than similar. Elinor, the older sister, is governed by her good sense, whereas Marianne, the younger and less experienced sister, is ruled by a romantic sensibility. Compare the personalities of the two sisters further. To what do you attribute these differences? Are their personalities fixed, or do they change over the course of the novel?

3. 	In Chapter 13, Elinor is shocked to learn that Marianne allowed Willoughby to show her his house without a chaperon. Marianne defends her action by saying, "If there had been any real impropriety in what I did, I should have been sensible of it at the time, for we always know when we are acting wrong." Is this a valid defense? Does the novel, in the end, support or reject Marianne''s notion of propriety?

4. 	Claire Tomalin has argued that Sense and Sensibility acts out a debate about behavior, in which Elinor represents discretion and privacy and Marianne represents emotional openness. Which side do you think wins this debate? Do you think the novel''s attempts to resolve this debate are successful? Why or why not?

5. 	Over the course of the novel, both Elinor and Marianne experience romantic reversals: Elinor when she discovers Edward Ferrars is engaged to Lucy Steele, and Marianne when she discovers Willoughby is to marry Miss Grey. What do these experiences teach Elinor and Marianne? Compare the reactions of each.

6. 	Sense and Sensibility presents a host of memorable minor characters, such as Mrs. Jennings, Mrs. Ferrars, and Mrs. John Dashwood. Discuss the role minor characters play in the novel. What issues or ideas do they help illuminate for the protagonists?

7. 	In Chapter 17, Elinor says the following with regard to the notion of character: "I have frequently detected myself in such kind of mistakes . . . in a total misapprehension of character in some points or other; fancying other people so much more gay or grave, or ingenious or stupid than they really are, and I can hardly tell why, or in what the deception originated. Sometimes one is guided by what they say of themselves, and very frequently by what others say of them, without giving oneself time to deliberate and judge." Discuss the theme of character in Sense and Sensibility. What does Elinor mean when she uses the word "character"? What, according to her, are good and bad judges of character? Does she follow her own advice? Which sort of character does the novel value?

8. 	Discuss the character of Lucy Steele. How would you describe her? What does she risk in telling Elinor of her engagement to Edward Ferrars? Does this seem shrewd or foolish to you?

9. 	At several points in the story, the characters discuss the value of "second attachments." For instance, in Chapter 17, Marianne makes plain that she does not believe a person can be in love more than once in his or her life. She says further, "At my time of life, opinions are tolerably fixed. It is not likely that I should see or hear anything to change them." Discuss the irony implicit in Marianne''s statement. Does the novel itself share her views? Which characters come to have second attachments?

10. 	Discuss the character of Willoughby. How is he punished for his decision to marry for money, in a way that someone like Lucy Steele is not? Why might this be the case?