Summer Crossing: A Novel

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Summer Crossing: A Novel

by Truman Capote

Random House Publishing Group | June 27, 2006 | Trade Paperback

Summer Crossing: A Novel is rated 4.3 out of 5 by 10.
Thought to be lost for over 50 years, here is the first novel by one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.

Set in New York during the summer of 1945, this is the story of a young carefree socialite, Grady, who must make serious decisions about the romance she is dangerously pursuing and the effect it will have on everyone involved.

Fans of Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Capote’s short stories will be thrilled to read Summer Crossing.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 160 pages, 7.99 × 5.15 × 0.41 in

Published: June 27, 2006

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0812975936

ISBN - 13: 9780812975932

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 1 out of 5 by from Tedious but I did it!! It took me 3 months to read this book....but I finally did it! As promised, this book describes 3 generations of a Chinese family, starting with the first person who was born in the 1800's. My reaction to this book was ultimately that I found it to be of very little entertainment to me. I was frustrated and irritated with much of it. My expectations were that this would be a book that would give me an interesting perspective into what life was like living through generations of Chinese history. But sadly, it is a book that is really a poorly told story which drones on and on about the hardship of the lives of these people. Chang is not really a writer as she believes and describes herself to be, but really just a person who wrote a story about herself, her perceptions of her life and the people in her life. It is mildly interesting, but leaves the writer with the question of "what is wrong with these Chinese people?". It does not elicit any sympathy or outrage as I would think that is what Chang was after, in telling this story. It leaves us wondering how generations of a people can be molded and brainwashed to do things that are clearly ridiculous. To be fair, she is able to express her own struggle with the lunacy of the time. But there are many inconsistencies in her story which leave the reader feeling confused about whether she is being truthful about the horrible situation, or whether she is doing her own version of propoganda and brainwashing, in an effort to give Western civilization her version, as though it were fact. One example of this, is when she is in university learning English, and asserts that there are no English publications for her to read so as to practice the language. In another chapter, she is asked to read an English newspaper by one of her friends. Where did this paper come from? So the inconsistencies in the story leave the reader feeling irritated and suspicious that the story is really not truly as she is describing it. However, I do not doubt that Communism is a crazy thing. So, I read it even though I really didn't like it because I thought it would improve. But it really didn't. It was just lots of the same. There is absolutely nothing uplifting about this book. No real happy ending. No real intriguing story line. I think that the story could have been much better told.
Date published: 2009-05-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Hooked at first sight Fascinating Chinese history and customs are interwoven with fiction in this story of 3 generations of women who struggled through the past 100 years of turmoil in China.
Date published: 2009-01-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Brilliant I deliberately picked this book off my shelf (I'd had it sitting there, unread for almost 2 years) to coincide with the start of the Beijing Olympics. But it took me almost 6 weeks to make my way through this beautiful tome. It's a memoir, yes, but is also chock-full of Chinese post-imperial history. If you have ever wondered about how Communism took hold there -- or why it never faltered -- or what really happened during the Cultural Revolution, then read this book. It was fascinating and horrifying and hope-inspiring and compelling. Informative and to-the-point, Jung Chang paints a frank picture of her homeland while painting an honest picture of a family that both benefitted and suffered under the Communist regime.
Date published: 2008-08-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful, moving book This book tells the story of Jung Chang's family, from her grandmother who was the concubine of a General; to her Mother who married a Communist party official, disgraced during the Cultural Revolution; to Jung Chang herself, a participant and victim of the Cultural Revolution. It is a superb book which tells the recent history of China in the lives of people
Date published: 2007-10-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Exciting look into Maoist China Chronicling the life of three generations of women, from grandmother, mother, and the author herself, "Wild Swans" is an eye-opening look into what life was like for the chinese people prior to, and during the rule of Mao Zedong, the former head of the communist party that is still in control of the Chinese government. From concubines and social upheavel to political activism, and unfounded accustations of treason against the government, "Wild Swans" sheds light on a time that is primarily unknown within the Western world. A wonderful book, and one that is so powerful in its message that it has actually been outlawed by the Communist party in modern-day China.
Date published: 2007-08-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Incredible Story! This book provides an amazing history of China in the last century through the 3 generations of women that the story follows. I learned so much about this foreign land, and the lives of the people who live there.
Date published: 2007-03-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Eye Opening A fascinating history lesson as told by a woman who lived it first hand. You get to see the rise and power of Mao through the eyes of a young, impressionable girl who manages to justify his every action even when his rule results in the torment and torture of her own family. I found myself reading portions of the book aloud to anyone who would listen as the author describes the turbulent times and horrendous living conditions forced upon her countrymen. This is a book you will tell all your friends about.
Date published: 2006-07-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I was hooked from the first page! This is the kind of book that every woman should read. We think here in Canada that we have it though! This is the story of 3 generations of Chinese woman that have survived through countless ordeals during a period in history which a lot of us do not know much about. Once you have read this book you will want to find out more about Mao, communism and other aspects of this period which defined a country and its people. This writing style is fluid and realistic. Realistic enough that at points you can almost see, smell and feel what these women encounter. Although found in the biography section of our store, this book could also have been placed in the history section.
Date published: 2006-06-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazingly Gripping and Chilling Three generations of women recount their lives both before and during the Communist reign in China. It provides rare understanding into why the Communist government was welcomed with such open arms- an account rarely told in the Western world. This book is both gripping and heart wrenching as the women pour forth their tales of trials and triumphs during daily life in China.
Date published: 2006-06-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A breathless page-turner! I couldn't put this book down. You will find yourself instantly captured by the strong female characters and even more awed upon remembering that this is a story of fact not fiction. I highly recommend Wild Swans to anyone.
Date published: 2006-06-03

– More About This Product –

Summer Crossing: A Novel

by Truman Capote

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 160 pages, 7.99 × 5.15 × 0.41 in

Published: June 27, 2006

Publisher: Random House Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0812975936

ISBN - 13: 9780812975932

Read from the Book

Chapter 1 “You are a mystery, my dear,” her mother said, and Grady, gazing across the table through a centerpiece of roses and fern, smiled indulgently: yes, I am a mystery, and it pleased her to think so. But Apple, eight years older, married, far from mysterious, said: “Grady is only foolish; I wish I were going with you. Imagine, Mama, this time next week you’ll be having breakfast in Paris! George keeps promising that we’ll go . . . I don’t know, though.” She paused and looked at her sister. “Grady, why on earth do you want to stay in New York in the dead of summer?” Grady wished they would leave her alone; still this harping, and here now was the very morning the boat sailed: what was there to say beyond what she’d said? After that there was only the truth, and the truth she did not entirely intend to tell. “I’ve never spent a summer here,” she said, escaping their eyes and looking out the window: the dazzle of traffic heightened the June morning quiet of Central Park, and the sun, full of first summer, that dries the green crust of spring, plunged through the trees fronting the Plaza, where they were breakfasting. “I’m perverse; have it your own way.” She realized with a smile it was perhaps a mistake to have said that: her family did come rather near thinking her perverse; and once when she was fourteen she’d had a terrible and quite acute insight: her mother, she saw, loved her without really liking her; she had thought at
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From the Publisher

Thought to be lost for over 50 years, here is the first novel by one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.

Set in New York during the summer of 1945, this is the story of a young carefree socialite, Grady, who must make serious decisions about the romance she is dangerously pursuing and the effect it will have on everyone involved.

Fans of Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Capote’s short stories will be thrilled to read Summer Crossing.

About the Author

Truman Capote was a native of New Orleans, where he was born on September 30, 1924. His first novel, Other Voices, Other Rooms, was an international literary success when first published in 1948, and accorded the author a prominent place among the writers of America's postwar generation. He sustained this position subsequently with short-story collections (A Tree of Night, among others), novels and novellas (The Grass Harp and Breakfast at Tiffany's), some of the best travel writing of our time (Local Color), profiles and reportage that appeared originally in The New Yorker (The Duke in His Domain and The Muses Are Heard), a true-crime masterpiece (In Cold Blood), several short memiors about his childhood in the South (A Christmas Memory, The Thanksgiving Visitor, and One Christmas), two plays (The Grass Harp and House of Flowers and two films (Beat the devil and The Innocents).

Mr. Capote twice won the O.Henry Memorial Short Story Prize and was a member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters. He died in August 1984, shortly before his sixtieth birthday.

Editorial Reviews

"Truman Capote is the most perfect writer of my generation."
-Norman Mailer