48 Laws Of Power

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48 Laws Of Power

by Joost Elffers, Robert Greene

Penguin Books USA | September 7, 2000 | Trade Paperback

48 Laws Of Power is rated 4.2222 out of 5 by 9.
Before Mastery, came The 48 Laws of Power—the New York Times bestseller that started it all
 
Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, The 48 Laws of Power is the definitive manual for anyone interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control. In the book that People magazine proclaimed “beguiling” and “fascinating,” Robert Greene and Joost Elffers have distilled three thousand years of the history of power into 48 essential laws by drawing from the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and Carl Von Clausewitz and also from the lives of figures ranging from Henry Kissinger to P.T. Barnum.
 
Some laws teach the need for prudence (“Law 1: Never Outshine the Master”), others teach the value of confidence (“Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness”), and many recommend absolute self-preservation (“Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally”). Every law, though, has one thing in common: an interest in total domination. In a bold and arresting two-color package, The 48 Laws of Power is ideal whether your aim is conquest, self-defense, or simply to understand the rules of the game.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 480 pages, 9.25 × 6.5 × 1.5 in

Published: September 7, 2000

Publisher: Penguin Books USA

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0140280197

ISBN - 13: 9780140280197

Found in: Health and Well Being

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from 48 Laws of Power This truly is an awsome book about life. The lessons you will learn in this book will open your eyes to the reality of life. Learn how to deal with People all types of People and situations while protecting your own interests. Learn how to deal with difficult People.
Date published: 2012-02-01
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Poor Summary of Social Engineering Greene has poorly recapped the last five hundred years of political engineering theory in this book. His writing seems to indicated a flawed mirroring of great theorists like Machiavelli. In short, skip this book, go read "Discourse on Livy" by Machiavelli.
Date published: 2009-10-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Disturbing and Interesting Read This book continues to sell in our business section, and contrary to what I tell customers, I don't think the book is being purchased for ironic purposes. This is a book that would make Sun Tzu seem fair and Machiavelli seem compassionate. The fact that other people think it gives good advice (whether it does or not), is reason enough to read it. If people are planning to use this advice in the world that we live in, we should know what that advice is. The 48 Laws of Power is a book that gives both good and useful advice, and frightening- but likely effective advice. It is a self help book for those people not concerned with morality. This is not to say that the book or its author are opposed to morality- indifferent is probably the most accurate word. The author would probably have us use morality if it is useful, most likely as a ruse to distract others. Robert Greene, the writer of this and 'The 33 Strategies of War' is clearly a fan of success and is not afraid to let the ends justify the means in order to get there. That said, the book is an entertaining read. It is well written, everything is clearly explained, and examples are well used and interesting. The Structure is solid and the book is easy to refer to in a moment. The book sites its sources and is entirely honest about its point of view. The author clearly considers those who seek to be good for its own sake as lambs waiting to be slaughtered, and the reader gets the sense throughout the book that Greene actually feels he is doing said lambs a favor by turning them into wolves. This is not a book for everyone, and it doesn't try to be. I think anyone looking to fashion a villain for print or film would find this book very useful, as would anyone in business- since they will certainly have to deal with the author's acolytes in the business world. This is a book that people may not like but should not ignore.
Date published: 2008-03-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An Excellent Book Hopefully, no one is thick enough to take this book as just a humorous commentary on social interaction. Taken in the PROPER CONTEXT, the laws illustrated in this book can be very effective. Weather you are looking to climb the corporate ladder or become a master in the art of seduction this book is an excellent investment. Having “field tested” a number of the laws with success, I can say this book is without a doubt one of the most influential books I’ve read on human interaction and social dynamics.
Date published: 2005-12-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Humorous Hopefully, noone is thick enough to take this book as social doctrine. Rather, it is a humorous commentary on social interaction riddled with tongue-in-cheek observations of the power games all of us, willingly or otherwise, immerse ourselves in. It is an amusing read, and anyone can relate to the author's analyses of common politics, whether within the confines of the office or the home. If you are looking to this book as a cudgel to wield over your enemies then you are sadly missing the point.
Date published: 2002-12-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Everyone should read this book This book is a must-read for anyone affected by politically-motivated relationships; essentially, anyone who is affected by society. All of us are, in one way or another, involved in power games, whether at work, in family or in personal relationships. While this book will never be accused of being a treatise of good moral virtues, it makes some important points, and illustrates difficult yet potent truths about the nature of the individual and society. Unfortunatly, if one follows the 48 laws of power, or even some of them, there is little room for sympathy, friendship or human emotions. He or she who seeks power must compromise other values, in particular, traditional moral values, in order to achieve it. If you follow these laws as they are written alone, it is unlikely you will achieve power. More likely, you will manage to allienate, anger and generally make enemies of, almost everyone you encounter. The value of this book is not as a prima facia guide to the power; rather, it is a collection of ideas of how you may choose to excercise your affairs to achieve what you seek, and moreover a warning to watch out for others who are seeking the same thing. It should be read, if only to open one's mind to the way people can, and often do, behave.
Date published: 2000-10-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Disillusionment The book is quite cynical: how to manipulate other people to gain power. But I found it very entertaining. I was attracted to this book because the abstract refers to Machiavelli, Sun-Tzu and the lifes of Talleyrand and Bismark who mastered the art of strategy and manipulating people and public opinion. Readers who place high value on moral principles and intellectual honesty will be disillusioned by the harsh reality that people can be easily manipulated. Hence, the book gives the impression of being a recipe of cynical tactical ploys. However, despite one's natural repulsion for the use of such tactics, the well-intentioned democrat must also follow those rules of power if he or she wants to gain power in order to have a favourable influence. The author is not himself a genuine strategist; his talent consisted of gathering a series of chosen pieces. He has taken a case approach and his illustrations are quite entertaining. I allowed four stars; I could not give it a five stars rating because it is not an essentially original work.
Date published: 1999-10-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Dangerous Book… The 48 Laws of Power give insight to the thoughts and actions of others. If you are in negotiations or playing power games at work, this book will help you achieve your goals. I now know what you are thinking and planning after reading this book.
Date published: 1999-07-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from 48 Laws of Power Great read!!! Easy to apply to real life immediately Although some of the laws seem to contradict themselves This is one book I read cover to cover in a week!! p.s. Politicians should be banned from buying this one : )
Date published: 1998-11-26

– More About This Product –

48 Laws Of Power

by Joost Elffers, Robert Greene

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 480 pages, 9.25 × 6.5 × 1.5 in

Published: September 7, 2000

Publisher: Penguin Books USA

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0140280197

ISBN - 13: 9780140280197

Table of Contents

Preface Law 1: Never outshine the master Always make those above you feel comfortably superior. In your desire to please or impress them, do not go too far in displaying your talents or you might accomplish the opposite—inspire fear and insecurity. Make your masters appear more brilliant than they are and you will attain the heights of power. Law 2: Never put too much trust in friends, learn how to use enemies Be wary of friends—they will betray you more quickly, for they are easily aroused to envy. They also become spoiled and tyrranical. But hire a former enemy and he will be more loyal than a friend, because he has more to prove. In fact, you have more to fear from friends than from enemies. If you have no enemies, find a way to make them. Law 3: Conceal your intentions Keep people off-balance and in the dark by never revealing the purpose behind your actions. If they have no clue what you are up to, they cannot prepare a defense. Guide them far enough down the wrong path, envelop them in enough smoke, and by the time they realize your intentions, it will be too late. Law 4: Always say less than necessary When you are trying to impress people with words, the more you say, the more common you appear, and the less in control. Even if you are saying something banal, it will seem original if you make it vague, open-ended, and sphinxlike. Powerful people impress and intimidate by saying less. The more you say, the more likely you are to say something foolish. Law 5:
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From the Publisher

Before Mastery, came The 48 Laws of Power—the New York Times bestseller that started it all
 
Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, The 48 Laws of Power is the definitive manual for anyone interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control. In the book that People magazine proclaimed “beguiling” and “fascinating,” Robert Greene and Joost Elffers have distilled three thousand years of the history of power into 48 essential laws by drawing from the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and Carl Von Clausewitz and also from the lives of figures ranging from Henry Kissinger to P.T. Barnum.
 
Some laws teach the need for prudence (“Law 1: Never Outshine the Master”), others teach the value of confidence (“Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness”), and many recommend absolute self-preservation (“Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally”). Every law, though, has one thing in common: an interest in total domination. In a bold and arresting two-color package, The 48 Laws of Power is ideal whether your aim is conquest, self-defense, or simply to understand the rules of the game.

From the Jacket

THE BESTSELLING BOOK FOR THOSE WHO WANT POWER, WATCH POWER, OR WANT TO ARM THEMSELVES AGAINST POWER . . .

A moral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this piercing work distills three thousand years of the history of power into forty-eight well-explicated laws. As attention-grabbing in its design as it is in its content, this bold volume outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun-tzu, Carl von Clausewitz, and other great thinkers. Some laws require prudence ("Law 1: Never Outshine the Master"), some stealth ("Law 3: Conceal Your Intentions"), and some the total absence of mercy ("Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally") but like it or not, all have applications in real-life situations. Illustrated through the tactics of Queen Elizabeth I, Henry Kissinger, P. T. Barnum, and other famous figures who have wielded -- or been victimized by -- power, these laws will fascinate any reader interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control.

About the Author

Robert Greene has a degree in classical studies and is the author of several bestselling books, including The 48 Laws of Power, The 33 Strategies of War, The Art of Seduction, and Mastery. He lives in Los Angeles.

Joost Elffers is the packaging genius behind Viking Studio''s Secret Language series, Play with Your Food, and How Are You Peeling?. He lives in New York City.

From Our Editors

 

This fascinating book examines the history of power and the tactics used by those who have held it. Written by authors Robert Greene and Joost Elffers, The 48 Laws of Power reveals the philosophy of power in such prominent and powerful thinkers as Machiavelli, Sun-tzu, Queen Elizabeth I, P.T. Barnum and Henry Kissinger, just to name a few. Each of the laws discussed are succinct and profound, and many of them are practical, thus giving them present day importance. The laws are varied, from secretive, “Conceal Your Intentions” to ruthless, “Crush Your Enemy Totally,” yet they all have some element of truth. This bold tome unashamedly details the truth regarding power and its philosophy. 

Editorial Reviews

Praise for The 48 Laws of Power:

“It’s the rules for suits . . . Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust.”
—New York magazine
 

“Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top.”
—People magazine
 

“An heir to Machiavelli’s Prince . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect vade mecum.”
—Publishers Weekly
 

“Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It’s The Rules meets In Pursuit of Wow! with a degree in comparative literature.”
—Allure