The Beekeeper's Apprentice: or, On the Segregation of the Queen

by Laurie R. King

St. Martin's Press | April 1, 2010 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

The Beekeeper's Apprentice: or, On the Segregation of the Queen is rated 3 out of 5 by 1.
What would happen if Sherlock Homles, a perfect man of the Victorian age--pompous, smug, and misogynisitic--were to come face to face with a twentieth-century female? If she grew to be a partner worthy of his great talents?

Laurie R. King, whose very different first novel,. A Grave Talent (SMP, 1993), drew rave reviews, read the Conan Doyle stories and wondered about such an imaginary encounter. And following through, she has written The Beekeeper's Apprentice.

1914, a young woman named Mary Russell meets a retired beekeeper on the Sussex Downs. His name is Sherlock Holmes. And although he may have all the Victorian "flaws" listed above, the Great Detective is no fool, and can spot a fellow intellect even in a fifteen-year-old woman.

So, at first informally, then consciously, he takes Mary Russell as his apprentice. They work on a few small local cases, then on a larger and more urgent investigation, which ends successfully. All the time, Mary is developing as a detective in her own right, with the benefit of the knowledge and experience of her mentor and, increasingly, friend.

And then the sky opens on them, and they find themselves the targets of a slippery, murderous, and apparently all-knowing adversary. Together they devise a plan to trap their enemy--a plan that may save their lives but may also kill off their relationship.

This is not a "Sherlock Holmes" story. It is the story of a modern young woman who comes to know and work with Holmes, the story of young woman coming to terms with herself and with this older man who embodies the age that is past.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: April 1, 2010

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1429936509

ISBN - 13: 9781429936507

Found in: Suspense

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Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from The Beekeeper's Apprentice The year is 1915 and Sherlock Holmes is retired, but a young lady of fifteen years falls into his life and she becomes his protégé. Mary Russell is orphaned and lives with an aunt who is only interested in Mary's inheritance and does not offer Mary any loving guidance. Sherlock Holmes takes the job of teaching Mary all the skills he has learned in his detective work. Mary Russell exhibits an impressive intelligence and is able to absorb what Sherlock teaches her. As she attends school at Oxford Mary spends her holidays with Holmes and they become involved in detective work together. Mary rescues a young girl from kidnappers and is able to help the young girl deal emotionally with her lose of innocence. Mary is able to relate to the girl's emotional turmoil through her own experience of losing her parents and brother in a car accident. In the crimes that Holmes and Mary solve there is a common menace. A criminal master mind has been stalking Holmes and the ones he loves and all of their lives are at risk. Mary and Sherlock Holmes have to combine their great minds to figure out who this criminal mastermind is. "The Beekeeper's Apprentice" by Laurie R. King is the first book in a series a books with Mary Russell being a detective. In this first book she learns the basics of detective work along the side of the great Sherlock Holmes himself. There are a few things I found hard to deal with in this book. The first thing was the treatment of Dr Watson, he is treated like a baboon and there is a general feeling that Holmes wants nothing to do with Watson now that he has Mary to work with. I think it would have made more sense if Watson was embraced and still loved, rather then shunned and ridiculed. He plays a very small role so why debase him? Another weakness with mystery novels is that so many words are spent on developing the scene of the crime and the detective work and as a result there are fewer words left for developing the characters. One thing I love about reading is falling in love with the characters and having them become my new best friends and it just does not fully develop into that type of relationship in this book, there are a few times it comes close, for example when Mary and Sherlock are in Palestine I truly feel Mary’s love for who she is and how she lost her family, I loved that section, but overall they did not become fast friends with me. This is a female power book; Mary is a great example of a female with a great intellect and of someone who gets the job done right. “The Beekeeper’s Apprentice” is an excellent read for young adult female readers who are looking for strong female characters.
Date published: 2009-08-16

– More About This Product –

The Beekeeper's Apprentice: or, On the Segregation of the Queen

by Laurie R. King

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: April 1, 2010

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1429936509

ISBN - 13: 9781429936507

From the Publisher

What would happen if Sherlock Homles, a perfect man of the Victorian age--pompous, smug, and misogynisitic--were to come face to face with a twentieth-century female? If she grew to be a partner worthy of his great talents?

Laurie R. King, whose very different first novel,. A Grave Talent (SMP, 1993), drew rave reviews, read the Conan Doyle stories and wondered about such an imaginary encounter. And following through, she has written The Beekeeper's Apprentice.

1914, a young woman named Mary Russell meets a retired beekeeper on the Sussex Downs. His name is Sherlock Holmes. And although he may have all the Victorian "flaws" listed above, the Great Detective is no fool, and can spot a fellow intellect even in a fifteen-year-old woman.

So, at first informally, then consciously, he takes Mary Russell as his apprentice. They work on a few small local cases, then on a larger and more urgent investigation, which ends successfully. All the time, Mary is developing as a detective in her own right, with the benefit of the knowledge and experience of her mentor and, increasingly, friend.

And then the sky opens on them, and they find themselves the targets of a slippery, murderous, and apparently all-knowing adversary. Together they devise a plan to trap their enemy--a plan that may save their lives but may also kill off their relationship.

This is not a "Sherlock Holmes" story. It is the story of a modern young woman who comes to know and work with Holmes, the story of young woman coming to terms with herself and with this older man who embodies the age that is past.