The City of Translation: Poetry and Ideology in Nineteenth-Century Colombia

by José María Rodríguez García

Palgrave Macmillan | August 31, 2010 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

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The two principal questions that The City of Translation sets out to answer are: how did poetry, philology, catechesis, and literary translation legitimate a coterie of right-wing literati's rise to power in Colombia? And how did these men proceed to dismantle a long-standing liberal-democratic state without derogating basic constitutional freedoms? To answer those questions, José María Rodríguez García investigates the emergence, development, and decline of what he calls "the reactionary city of translation" - a variation on, and a correction to, Ángel Rama's understanding of the nineteenth-century "lettered city" as a primarily liberal and modernizing project. The City of Translation makes the tropes of "translatio" the conceptual nucleus of a comprehensive analysis that cuts across academic disciplines, ranging from political philosophy and the history of concepts to the relationship of literature to religious doctrine and the law.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: August 31, 2010

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0230315364

ISBN - 13: 9780230315365

Found in: Fiction

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The City of Translation: Poetry and Ideology in Nineteenth-Century Colombia

by José María Rodríguez García

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: August 31, 2010

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0230315364

ISBN - 13: 9780230315365

From the Publisher

The two principal questions that The City of Translation sets out to answer are: how did poetry, philology, catechesis, and literary translation legitimate a coterie of right-wing literati's rise to power in Colombia? And how did these men proceed to dismantle a long-standing liberal-democratic state without derogating basic constitutional freedoms? To answer those questions, José María Rodríguez García investigates the emergence, development, and decline of what he calls "the reactionary city of translation" - a variation on, and a correction to, Ángel Rama's understanding of the nineteenth-century "lettered city" as a primarily liberal and modernizing project. The City of Translation makes the tropes of "translatio" the conceptual nucleus of a comprehensive analysis that cuts across academic disciplines, ranging from political philosophy and the history of concepts to the relationship of literature to religious doctrine and the law.