The Linux Book

by David Elboth

Pearson Education | March 29, 2001 | Trade Paperback

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Foreword This book will serve both as an introduction for newcomers to Linux and as a reference for professionals. The book starts with the basics and goes through the most important Linux commands. If you are an IT manager wondering if Linux would make a good client or server operating system for your company, you will find it very valuable to read Chapter 25, "Cost/Benefit Analysis." I started with Unix 15 years ago and have written three books on UNIX3: UNIX: From User to System Administrator, UNIX: An Introduction, and UNIX Commands by Example: A Desktop Reference for Solaris, UnixWare, and SCO UNIX. In the past four years, I have also written two books on Linux: Linux Installation and Configuration, and Introduction to Red Hat Linux 7.0. I was first introduced to UNIX in 1985, when the operating system was called Microsoft XENIX (a UNIX clone). At that time the machine hardware was based on a PC with a 4.77 MHz Intel CPU, 640 KB RAM, and a 10-MB hard disk. Later I worked with both BSD and System V-based solutions like SCO XENIX, SCO UNIX, ISC UNIX, Novell UnixWare, Solaris 1.x, Solaris 2.x, IBM AIX, SCO UnixWare, NCR Unix V.4, and of course, Linux. Early in 1997 I started working on an Intranet/WEB-development project for a Norwegian company called Telenor Marlink. In this project, the development platform was based on Sunsoft Solaris 2.5. A colleague named Knut Ranheim was also working on this project and wanted us to use Linux and PC hardware as the workstation platform. Since then I have been hooked on the Open Source model and Linux. Today, I work as a project leader for different Linux software projects. In my part time, I am Contributing Editor for the Norwegian Linux magazine, Open Source Linux Magazine. I also write books and am a well-known lecturer. If you would like to know what I use Linux for, check my homepage: http://home.c2i.net/delboth align="right">- David Elboth

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 528 pages, 9.15 × 7.06 × 1.08 in

Published: March 29, 2001

Publisher: Pearson Education

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0130327654

ISBN - 13: 9780130327659

Found in: Unix

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– More About This Product –

The Linux Book

by David Elboth

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 528 pages, 9.15 × 7.06 × 1.08 in

Published: March 29, 2001

Publisher: Pearson Education

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0130327654

ISBN - 13: 9780130327659

Read from the Book

Foreword This book will serve both as an introduction for newcomers to Linux and as a reference for professionals. The book starts with the basics and goes through the most important Linux commands. If you are an IT manager wondering if Linux would make a good client or server operating system for your company, you will find it very valuable to read Chapter 25, "Cost/Benefit Analysis." I started with Unix 15 years ago and have written three books on UNIX3: UNIX: From User to System Administrator , UNIX: An Introduction , and UNIX Commands by Example: A Desktop Reference for Solaris, UnixWare, and SCO UNIX . In the past four years, I have also written two books on Linux: Linux Installation and Configuration , and Introduction to Red Hat Linux 7.0 . I was first introduced to UNIX in 1985, when the operating system was called Microsoft XENIX (a UNIX clone). At that time the machine hardware was based on a PC with a 4.77 MHz Intel CPU, 640 KB RAM, and a 10-MB hard disk. Later I worked with both BSD and System V-based solutions like SCO XENIX, SCO UNIX, ISC UNIX, Novell UnixWare, Solaris 1.x, Solaris 2.x, IBM AIX, SCO UnixWare, NCR Unix V.4, and of course, Linux. Early in 1997 I started working on an Intranet/WEB-development project for a Norwegian company called Telenor Marlink. In this project, the development platform was based on Sunsoft Solaris 2.5. A colleague named Knut Ranheim was also working on this project and wanted us to use Linux and PC hardware as the workstation pl
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Table of Contents

Foreword. 1. The Linux Book. Using Linux. Try and fail. Explanations in this book. Linux and GNU. 2. The Operating System. The Linux operating system. A multi-user operating system. Concepts and technology. Linux and architecture support. The Linux kernel. The Linux shell. Utilities. How to use Linux commands. Pipes, filters, and redirections. Editing text. The system administrator, or root. 3. Installation. Introduction. Preparing to install Linux. Installation overview. Linux and the keyboard. Different installation methods. Installation disk or CD. CD auto-boot from DOS. Selecting the language and character set. Configuring the mouse. Installation classes. Defining filesystems. Format and partitions. Installing LILO. Network configuration. Setting up TCP/IP. Configuring the time zone. Defining the root password. Defining authentication. Selecting Linux components. Configuring the X window system. Installing packages. Linux boot floppy disk. Finishing the installation. After the installation. Removing Linux. 4. Linux Work Session. After the installation. Username and password. Logging in. Linux help functions. A work session in Linux. Logging out from Linux. Taking the Linux system down. Exercises for Chapter 4. 5. Information from the Linux System. Commands that gather information. Calendar - cal. Echo to the screen - echo. List files - ls. Date and time - date. Who is logged in?-who. Who am I?-whoami. User information - finger. Determine current file type - file. Terminal
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From the Publisher

Foreword This book will serve both as an introduction for newcomers to Linux and as a reference for professionals. The book starts with the basics and goes through the most important Linux commands. If you are an IT manager wondering if Linux would make a good client or server operating system for your company, you will find it very valuable to read Chapter 25, "Cost/Benefit Analysis." I started with Unix 15 years ago and have written three books on UNIX3: UNIX: From User to System Administrator, UNIX: An Introduction, and UNIX Commands by Example: A Desktop Reference for Solaris, UnixWare, and SCO UNIX. In the past four years, I have also written two books on Linux: Linux Installation and Configuration, and Introduction to Red Hat Linux 7.0. I was first introduced to UNIX in 1985, when the operating system was called Microsoft XENIX (a UNIX clone). At that time the machine hardware was based on a PC with a 4.77 MHz Intel CPU, 640 KB RAM, and a 10-MB hard disk. Later I worked with both BSD and System V-based solutions like SCO XENIX, SCO UNIX, ISC UNIX, Novell UnixWare, Solaris 1.x, Solaris 2.x, IBM AIX, SCO UnixWare, NCR Unix V.4, and of course, Linux. Early in 1997 I started working on an Intranet/WEB-development project for a Norwegian company called Telenor Marlink. In this project, the development platform was based on Sunsoft Solaris 2.5. A colleague named Knut Ranheim was also working on this project and wanted us to use Linux and PC hardware as the workstation platform. Since then I have been hooked on the Open Source model and Linux. Today, I work as a project leader for different Linux software projects. In my part time, I am Contributing Editor for the Norwegian Linux magazine, Open Source Linux Magazine. I also write books and am a well-known lecturer. If you would like to know what I use Linux for, check my homepage: http://home.c2i.net/delboth align="right">- David Elboth

From the Jacket

  • Practical guidance for every beginning- to intermediate-level Linux user and sysadmin
  • User management, file systems, backup/restore, printing, and much more
  • Linux networking and integration for Windows, Mac, and DOS systems

The complete, vendor-neutral guide to installing, configuring, and running Linux!

How do you find the right Linux book? They''re either too technical, too superficial, or they cover the wrong distribution. Finally, there''s a book that offers the perfect balance: The Linux Book. It''ll never insult your intelligence, nor will it make you wade through 1,000 pages of technical gibberish! You''ll find the information you really need to install, configure, and maintain any current version of Linux (and integrate it seamlessly with your existing computers. If you don''t need it, it''s not here. If you do need it, it is. It''s that simple!

  • Step-by-step installation and configuration
  • Linux files, directories, and file systems
  • System administration, from boot-up to backup
  • Managing passwords and user access
  • Running the X Window system
  • Networking and integrating Windows, DOS, and Macintosh systems
  • File and print sharing with Network File System (NFS) and Samba (smb)
  • Shell scripting, system commands, kernel management, and much more
  • Cost/benefit analysis connected to choosing Linux versus Windows

The Linux Book even presents a chapter-length cost-benefit analysis for any organization considering Linux. Whether you plan to run your desktop or your entire network with Linux, you won''t find a more useful, practical guide!

About the Author

DAVID ELBOTH leads the Open Source Linux department at Ecsoft in Norway, and is Editor-in-Chief for the Norwegian Open Source Linux magazine. He has authored two previous books on Linux and three books on UNIX.

From the Author

Foreword This book will serve both as an introduction for newcomers to Linux and as a reference for professionals. The book starts with the basics and goes through the most important Linux commands. If you are an IT manager wondering if Linux would make a good client or server operating system for your company, you will find it very valuable to read Chapter 25, "Cost/Benefit Analysis." I started with Unix 15 years ago and have written three books on UNIX3: UNIX: From User to System Administrator , UNIX: An Introduction , and UNIX Commands by Example: A Desktop Reference for Solaris, UnixWare, and SCO UNIX . In the past four years, I have also written two books on Linux: Linux Installation and Configuration , and Introduction to Red Hat Linux 7.0 . I was first introduced to UNIX in 1985, when the operating system was called Microsoft XENIX (a UNIX clone). At that time the machine hardware was based on a PC with a 4.77 MHz Intel CPU, 640 KB RAM, and a 10MB hard disk. Later I worked with both BSD and System Vbased solutions like SCO XENIX, SCO UNIX, ISC UNIX, Novell UnixWare, Solaris 1.x, Solaris 2.x, IBM AIX, SCO UnixWare, NCR Unix V.4, and of course, Linux. Early in 1997 I started working on an Intranet/WEBdevelopment project for a Norwegian company called Telenor Marlink. In this project, the development platform was based on Sunsoft Solaris 2.5. A colleague named Knut Ranheim was also working on this project and wanted us to use Linux and PC hardware as the workstation platf
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