The Story of Jane Doe: A Book About Rape

by Jane Doe

April 15, 2003 | Hardcover

The Story of Jane Doe: A Book About Rape is rated 5 out of 5 by 2.
Startling, incisive and surprisingly funny, this is the true story of a woman who challenged stereotypes, the justice system, the police -- and won.

On an August night in 1986, Jane Doe became the fifth reported woman raped by a sexual serial predator dubbed the Balcony Rapist. Even though the police had full knowledge of the rapist’s modus operandi, they made a conscious decision not to issue a warning to women in her neighbourhood. Jane Doe quickly realized that women were being used by the police as bait. The rapist was captured as a result of a tip received after she and a group of women distributed 2,000 posters alerting the community. During the criminal proceedings, Jane Doe became the first raped woman in Ontario to secure her own legal representation -- allowing her to sit in on the hearings instead of out in the hall where victim-witnesses are usually cloistered. As a result, Jane heard details of the police investigation normally withheld from women in her position, which revealed a shocking degree of police negligence and gender discrimination. When the rapist was convicted, the comfort was cold. In 1987, Jane Doe sued the Metropolitan Police Force for negligence and charter violation. It took eleven long years before her civil case finally came to trial -- the rest is history.

This extraordinary book asks the diffcult question: Who benefits from rape? Popular ideas about rape still inform the way police and society behave around raped women. Despite decades of trying to rewrite the myths, the myths still exist, and they tell us that women lie about rape, that women enjoy it, that women file false rape reports to seek revenge and money. They tell us rape can be non-violent. They tell us that women can make good or bad rape victims or that women cannot be raped at all. They tell us nonsense -- and Jane Doe gives us a unique view on why.
This is a book about rape that is not about being a “victim.” It’s about a woman who wanted to ensure that she, the person most involved, directed her case and the course of her life. It’s about external elements colliding to provide a small window of redress for women who experience crimes of violence. Jane Doe was a test case -- the right woman in the wrong place at the right time -- and she made legal history.

In The Story of Jane Doe, she asks us to challenge our own assumptions about rape and, in the process, surprises us with a story that is by turns sweet, tragic and fantastical. But most of all, this book celebrates what is most common in human nature -- our ability to overcome.

“Rape stories are not new stories. They are as old as war, as old as man. Many bookstores have sections devoted to them, and I read them. I read them “before,” too. I have found most rape stories to be either chronicles of fear and horror, victim tales that make me want to run screaming from the page (although I do not). Or they are dry, academic or legal treatises on why rape is bad, written in language I must work to understand. Both are valid. But both somehow limit me from reaching a broader understanding . . . No book has ever reflected my lived experience of the crime.” -- Jane Doe

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 384 pages

Published: April 15, 2003

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 067931153X

ISBN - 13: 9780679311539

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Jane Doe is Amazing! This Book is a book about a woman who was raped and the challenges she goes through after her rape. This woman is adimireable for how she stands her ground. She is strong and she fought a battle which she never thought she would win. The Story of Jane Doe would change you views on how things work and how people can turn on you. If you want know what I'm talking about, read the book!
Date published: 2006-09-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Must Read Every woman should read this book and then pass it on to the nearest man she knows. Jane Doe's true story about her rape and subsequent civil trial against the Toronto Metropolitan Police is unforgettable. It teaches us in simple language the many reasons why so many rapes still go unreported in Canada and elsewhere. She exposes the policing systems as inadequate and describes her efforts to effect change. Heartbreaking and empowering.
Date published: 2006-05-18

– More About This Product –

The Story of Jane Doe: A Book About Rape

by Jane Doe

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 384 pages

Published: April 15, 2003

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 067931153X

ISBN - 13: 9780679311539

Read from the Book

The BackgroundOn an August night in 1986, Jane Doe became the fifth reported woman raped by a sexual serial predator dubbed the Balcony Rapist. The rapist stalked single women who lived alone in second- and third-floor apartments in a downtown Toronto neighbourhood. He scaled the outside walls of high-rises located within a six-block radius and entered the apartments through locked balcony doors.Despite the fact that the police had full knowledge of his modus operandi, they made a conscious decision not to issue a warning about the rapist to women in the neighbourhood. Their rationale was that women, hearing the news, would become hysterical, and the rapist would flee the area. Informed of their decision a few days after her rape, the woman who became known as Jane Doe quickly realized that she, in particular, and women, generally, were being used by the police as bait to catch the rapist.The woman who became Jane Doe was actively involved in the then thriving women’s movement. She worked for a high-profile film festival and was experienced in public relations and marketing. She took it upon herself to organize a series of press conferences, postered her neighbourhood with warnings and delivered a deputation to the Police Services Board, demanding that the police be accountable. The rapist was captured as a result of a tip received after Jane and other women distributed two thousand posters – including one to the home of the man who raped her – alerting the community to the d
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Table of Contents

The background
A preliminary note from Jane
Civil trial journal
1. Safe at home in bed
2. "First interrogation" (in the voice of Bill Cameron)
3. Ruined blue party dress
4. "She's not such a tough nut" (in the voice of Bill Cameron)
5. "Our own worst nightmares" (in the voice of Margo Pulford)
6. What's a Gentleman Rapist?
7. "Goddamn, if she didn't poster" (in the voice of Bill Cameron)
8. "She's not the enemy" (in the voice of Margo Pulford)
9. Eating grass with the police
10. "They tell me not to call her" (in the voice of Margo Pulford)
11. "Jane doesn't get it" (in the voice of Bill Cameron)
12. How to survive a rape trial
13. How it feels to be well and truly stonewalled
14. How I became Jane Doe
15. When I was not Jane Doe
16. Feminist warning
17. The ultimate rape victim
18. Living with it
19. No means nothing
20. Maybe a foreign city will help
21. The right to take the police to court
22. A Jane Doe who couldn't live with it
23. The damage done, and a new leaf
24. Practically the worst thing that ever happened to me
25. Discovering Jane Doe
26. Psychiatric mudslinging (I mean assessment)
27. As ready as I'll ever be
Civil trial journal
28. Winning
29. A memory of our goodness recalled
30. The shimmering social audit
31. First wave, second wave, no way
32. Still and always a feminist
33. Why men rape
34. Another turn of the wheel
35. A note from the parole board
36. The only ending so far
Where are they now?
Some relevant statistics
Acknowledgements

From the Publisher

Startling, incisive and surprisingly funny, this is the true story of a woman who challenged stereotypes, the justice system, the police -- and won.

On an August night in 1986, Jane Doe became the fifth reported woman raped by a sexual serial predator dubbed the Balcony Rapist. Even though the police had full knowledge of the rapist’s modus operandi, they made a conscious decision not to issue a warning to women in her neighbourhood. Jane Doe quickly realized that women were being used by the police as bait. The rapist was captured as a result of a tip received after she and a group of women distributed 2,000 posters alerting the community. During the criminal proceedings, Jane Doe became the first raped woman in Ontario to secure her own legal representation -- allowing her to sit in on the hearings instead of out in the hall where victim-witnesses are usually cloistered. As a result, Jane heard details of the police investigation normally withheld from women in her position, which revealed a shocking degree of police negligence and gender discrimination. When the rapist was convicted, the comfort was cold. In 1987, Jane Doe sued the Metropolitan Police Force for negligence and charter violation. It took eleven long years before her civil case finally came to trial -- the rest is history.

This extraordinary book asks the diffcult question: Who benefits from rape? Popular ideas about rape still inform the way police and society behave around raped women. Despite decades of trying to rewrite the myths, the myths still exist, and they tell us that women lie about rape, that women enjoy it, that women file false rape reports to seek revenge and money. They tell us rape can be non-violent. They tell us that women can make good or bad rape victims or that women cannot be raped at all. They tell us nonsense -- and Jane Doe gives us a unique view on why.
This is a book about rape that is not about being a “victim.” It’s about a woman who wanted to ensure that she, the person most involved, directed her case and the course of her life. It’s about external elements colliding to provide a small window of redress for women who experience crimes of violence. Jane Doe was a test case -- the right woman in the wrong place at the right time -- and she made legal history.

In The Story of Jane Doe, she asks us to challenge our own assumptions about rape and, in the process, surprises us with a story that is by turns sweet, tragic and fantastical. But most of all, this book celebrates what is most common in human nature -- our ability to overcome.

“Rape stories are not new stories. They are as old as war, as old as man. Many bookstores have sections devoted to them, and I read them. I read them “before,” too. I have found most rape stories to be either chronicles of fear and horror, victim tales that make me want to run screaming from the page (although I do not). Or they are dry, academic or legal treatises on why rape is bad, written in language I must work to understand. Both are valid. But both somehow limit me from reaching a broader understanding . . . No book has ever reflected my lived experience of the crime.” -- Jane Doe

From the Jacket

Startling, incisive and surprisingly funny, this is the true story of a woman who challenged stereotypes, the justice system, the police -- and won.
On an August night in 1986, Jane Doe became the fifth reported woman raped by a sexual serial predator dubbed the Balcony Rapist. Even though the police had full knowledge of the rapist's modus operandi, they made a conscious decision not to issue a warning to women in her neighbourhood. Jane Doe quickly realized that women were being used by the police as bait. The rapist was captured as a result of a tip received after she and a group of women distributed 2,000 posters alerting the community. During the criminal proceedings, Jane Doe became the first raped woman in Ontario to secure her own legal representation -- allowing her to sit in on the hearings instead of out in the hall where victim-witnesses are usually cloistered. As a result, Jane heard details of the police investigation normally withheld from women in her position, which revealed a shocking degree of police negligence and gender discrimination. When the rapist was convicted, the comfort was cold. In 1987, Jane Doe sued the Metropolitan Police Force for negligence and charter violation. It took eleven long years before her civil case finally came to trial -- the rest is history.
This extraordinary book asks the diffcult question: Who benefits from rape? Popular ideas about rape still inform the way police and society behave around raped women. Despite decades of trying to rewrite the myths, the myths still exist, and they tell us that women lie about rape, that women enjoy it, that women file false rape reports to seek revenge and money. They tell us rape can benon-violent. They tell us that women can make good or bad rape victims or that women cannot be raped at all. They tell us nonsense -- and Jane Doe gives us a unique view on why.
This is a book about rape that is not about being a "victim." It's about a woman who wanted to ensure that she, the person most involved, directed her case and the course of her life. It's about external elements colliding to provide a small window of redress for women who experience crimes of violence. Jane Doe was a test case -- the right woman in the wrong place at the right time -- and she made legal history.
In The Story of Jane Doe, she asks us to challenge our own assumptions about rape and, in the process, surprises us with a story that is by turns sweet, tragic and fantastical. But most of all, this book celebrates what is most common in human nature -- our ability to overcome.
""Rape stories are not new stories. They are as old as war, as old as man. Many bookstores have sections devoted to them, and I read them. I read them "before," too. I have found most rape stories to be either chronicles of fear and horror, victim tales that make me want to run screaming from the page (although I do not). Or they are dry, academic or legal treatises on why rape is bad, written in language I must work to understand. Both are valid. But both somehow limit me from reaching a broader understanding . . . No book has ever reflected my lived experience of the crime." -- Jane Doe

About the Author

The woman known as Jane Doe is a teacher and an arts and culture worker who lectures extensively about her case. Her civil trial in 1998 was the focal point of headline coverage in national newspapers. Currently, CBC is making a TV movie about her experience called The Many Trials of One Jane Doe. Jane Doe’s case is now cited in tort law textbooks and studied in law schools internationally.

Editorial Reviews

“Part journal, part comix, part scrapbook, this book is held together by a narrative as compelling as any Law & Order episode.” -- The Mirror (Montreal)

“This book will haunt the corridors of power for decades to come.” -- June Callwood

The Story of Jane Doe is a startling document about a woman who was not willing to play the standard role of victim, a woman who brought attention to how rape was being handled by the police force, the legal system and, more important, by society…. I found this book to be a thoroughly engrossing, intelligent account of rape, and I must say quite an eye-opener to boot.” -- The Edmonton Journal

“A vital political document.... A conscientious, meticulously documented account of the author’s experience, less as one woman than as one among many…. Under the cold comfort of her blanket of anonymity, Jane Doe has produced a ground-breaking charter, a bill of rights for anyone who, up against it, would sooner fight than take flight; would rather embrace her individuality than surrender it up.” -- Lynn Crosbie in the Toronto Star


From the Trade Paperback edition.