The Wind Through the Keyhole: A Dark Tower Novel

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The Wind Through the Keyhole: A Dark Tower Novel

by Stephen King

Scribner | April 24, 2012 | Hardcover

The Wind Through the Keyhole: A Dark Tower Novel is rated 4.75 out of 5 by 4.
In The Wind Through the Keyhole, Stephen King returns to the rich landscape of Mid-World, the spectacular territory of the Dark Tower fantasy saga that stands as his most beguiling achievement.

Roland Deschain and his ka-tetJake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy, the billy-bumbler—encounter a ferocious storm just after crossing the River Whye on their way to the Outer Baronies. As they shelter from the howling gale, Roland tells his friends not just one strange story but two . . . and in so doing, casts new light on his own troubled past.

In his early days as a gunslinger, in the guilt-ridden year following his mother’s death, Roland is sent by his father to investigate evidence of a murderous shape-shifter, a “skin-man” preying upon the population around Debaria. Roland takes charge of Bill Streeter, the brave but terrified boy who is the sole surviving witness to the beast’s most recent slaughter. Only a teenager himself, Roland calms the boy and prepares him for the following day’s trials by reciting a story from the Magic Tales of the Eld that his mother often read to him at bedtime. “A person’s never too old for stories,” Roland says to Bill. “Man and boy, girl and woman, never too old. We live for them.” And indeed, the tale that Roland unfolds, the legend of Tim Stoutheart, is a timeless treasure for all ages, a story that lives for us.

King began the Dark Tower series in 1974; it gained momentum in the 1980s; and he brought it to a thrilling conclusion when the last three novels were published in 2003 and 2004. The Wind Through the Keyhole is sure to fascinate avid fans of the Dark Tower epic. But this novel also stands on its own for all readers, an enchanting and haunting journey to Roland’s world and testimony to the power of Stephen King’s storytelling magic.

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 320 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.2 in

Published: April 24, 2012

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1451658907

ISBN - 13: 9781451658903

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic! I haven't finished reading it yet, but I love it! It is just as enjoyable as all the other books in The Dark Tower series. For Stephen King fans, this is a must read.
Date published: 2012-08-22
Rated out of 5 by from A story within a story within a story, I was highly entertained with this book.
Date published: 2012-06-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from DOES WELL AS A STAND ALONE FOR NON DT READERS We revisit with Roland Deschain and his ka-tet in this addition to the dark Tower series. As a sudden and deadly starkblast (storm) traps our travelers Roland once again assumes the roll of story- teller. Going back in his memories to the time when he was a very young gunslinger sent to find out more about an elusive “skinman”, a shape shifter plaguing a small town in Mid-World. There he meets a young witness and another impending starkblast. As he is holed up with his young witness he tells him the story of Tim Southeart. And an interesting tale it is. In the forward to the book Mr. King describes this as part 4.5 in the Dark Tower series. Chronologically in the series that may well be where it falls, but it can stand alone as a good tale. It may help to know about the Ka-tet and their travels as background, but they quickly fall to the misty edge of the book once Roland’s story gets started. It is a story within a story, within the framework of Mid-world. For Mr. Kings “constant readers” there is also a reference to “Eyes of the Dragon” and Merlin. It comes together nicely. Mr. King once again shows us what he does best … tells a good yarn with appealing characters and enough action, magic and mystery to keep his reader happy.
Date published: 2012-05-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Dark Tower 4.5 Here we have an addition to the Dark Tower series that does nothing to the overall story, which is good since that series ended a few years ago, but gives us some more background on the Gunslinger's youth. The Wind Through the Keyhole is actually the story within the story within the story. It's the last one to start, the first one to finish and the best of the bunch. The story within the story gives some background on Roland while the initial story serves only as a setting for the stories to be told. Confused? I've probably made it sound more complicated than it is. Here's what matters: Can you read this book without having read the other books in the series? Yes, not much of what has gone on before is required knowledge to enjoy this book. Will reading this out of order ruin the book? No, the book was written out of order in relation to the series. Should I read this book? Most certainly.
Date published: 2012-05-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Ka-tet awaits you... What can I say...I'm a Dark Tower junkie from way back. If you're a DT fan, run, don't walk and go get this book. Even those who've never read a DT novel should be able to enjoy this tale (within a tale...within a tale). This is King at his storytelling finest and more than proves he's still got it. While the final DT books may have felt he was rushing to finish the tale before he perhaps could not, this is King writing as he did in those earlier tales. This book picks up where Wizard & Glass leaves off, and has much of the same character of parts of that novel, in that we're once again looking at a story from Roland's past. This is a much briefer tale though, and it's probably my only complaint of the book. There's clearly soo much more King could tell of Roland's world, his youth. While most of us know how the story ultimately ends, it most certainly won't ruin your enjoyment of this piece. You'll be drawn in as to one of the pieces of Maerlyn’s Rainbow... My only hope is that sai King decides to visit Mid-World yet again in the near future. It would be awful for him to take all the stories with him to the clearing at the end of the path.
Date published: 2012-05-02

– More About This Product –

The Wind Through the Keyhole: A Dark Tower Novel

by Stephen King

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 320 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.2 in

Published: April 24, 2012

Publisher: Scribner

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1451658907

ISBN - 13: 9781451658903

About the Book

For those discovering the epic bestselling Dark Tower series for the first time--and for its legions of dedicated fans--an immensely satisfying stand-alone novel and perfect introduction to the series.

Read from the Book

1 During the days after they left the Green Palace that wasn’t Oz after all—but which was now the tomb of the unpleasant fellow Roland’s ka-tet had known as the Tick-Tock Man—the boy Jake began to range farther and farther ahead of Roland, Eddie, and Susannah. “Don’t you worry about him?” Susannah asked Roland. “Out there on his own?” “He’s got Oy with him,” Eddie said, referring to the billy-bumbler who had adopted Jake as his special friend. “Mr. Oy gets along with nice folks all right, but he’s got a mouthful of sharp teeth for those who aren’t so nice. As that guy Gasher found out to his sorrow.” “Jake also has his father’s gun,” Roland said. “And he knows how to use it. That he knows very well. And he won’t leave the Path of the Beam.” He pointed overhead with his reduced hand. The low-hanging sky was mostly still, but a single corridor of clouds moved steadily southeast. Toward the land of Thunderclap, if the note left behind for them by the man who styled himself RF had told the truth. Toward the Dark Tower. “But why—” Susannah began, and then her wheelchair hit a bump. She turned to Eddie. “Watch where you’re pushin me, sugar.” “Sorry,” Eddie said. “Public Works hasn’t been doing any maintenance along this stretch of the turnpike lately. Must be dealing with budget cuts.” I
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From the Publisher

In The Wind Through the Keyhole, Stephen King returns to the rich landscape of Mid-World, the spectacular territory of the Dark Tower fantasy saga that stands as his most beguiling achievement.

Roland Deschain and his ka-tet—Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy, the billy-bumbler—encounter a ferocious storm just after crossing the River Whye on their way to the Outer Baronies. As they shelter from the howling gale, Roland tells his friends not just one strange story but two . . . and in so doing, casts new light on his own troubled past.

In his early days as a gunslinger, in the guilt-ridden year following his mother’s death, Roland is sent by his father to investigate evidence of a murderous shape-shifter, a “skin-man” preying upon the population around Debaria. Roland takes charge of Bill Streeter, the brave but terrified boy who is the sole surviving witness to the beast’s most recent slaughter. Only a teenager himself, Roland calms the boy and prepares him for the following day’s trials by reciting a story from the Magic Tales of the Eld that his mother often read to him at bedtime. “A person’s never too old for stories,” Roland says to Bill. “Man and boy, girl and woman, never too old. We live for them.” And indeed, the tale that Roland unfolds, the legend of Tim Stoutheart, is a timeless treasure for all ages, a story that lives for us.

King began the Dark Tower series in 1974; it gained momentum in the 1980s; and he brought it to a thrilling conclusion when the last three novels were published in 2003 and 2004. The Wind Through the Keyhole is sure to fascinate avid fans of the Dark Tower epic. But this novel also stands on its own for all readers, an enchanting and haunting journey to Roland’s world and testimony to the power of Stephen King’s storytelling magic.

About the Author

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His most recent include 11/22/63, Full Dark, No Stars, Under the Dome, Just Past Sunset, and Lisey’s Story. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.