Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey Of Pat Tillman

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Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey Of Pat Tillman

by Jon Krakauer

Diversified Publishing | September 15, 2009 | Trade Paperback | Large Print

Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey Of Pat Tillman is rated 4.6 out of 5 by 5.
The bestselling author of Into the Wild, Into Thin Air, and Under the Banner of Heaven delivers a stunning, eloquent account of a remarkable young man’s haunting journey.

Like the men whose epic stories Jon Krakauer has told in his previous bestsellers, Pat Tillman was an irrepressible individualist and iconoclast. In May 2002, Tillman walked away from his $3.6 million NFL contract to enlist in the United States Army. He was deeply troubled by 9/11, and he felt a strong moral obligation to join the fight against al-Qaeda and the Taliban. Two years later, he died on a desolate hillside in southeastern Afghanistan.

Though obvious to most of the two dozen soldiers on the scene that a ranger in Tillman’s own platoon had fired the fatal shots, the Army aggressively maneuvered to keep this information from Tillman’s wife, other family members, and the American public for five weeks following his death. During this time, President Bush repeatedly invoked Tillman’s name to promote his administration’s foreign policy. Long after Tillman’s nationally televised memorial service, the Army grudgingly notified his closest relatives that he had “probably” been killed by friendly fire while it continued to dissemble about the details of his death and who was responsible.

In Where Men Win Glory, Jon Krakauer draws on Tillman’s journals and letters, interviews with his wife and friends, conversations with the soldiers who served alongside him, and extensive research on the ground in Afghanistan to render an intricate mosaic of this driven, complex, and uncommonly compelling figure as well as the definitive account of the events and actions that led to his death. Before he enlisted in the army, Tillman was familiar to sports aficionados as an undersized, overachieving Arizona Cardinals safety whose virtuosity in the defensive backfield was spellbinding. With his shoulder-length hair, outspoken views, and boundless intellectual curiosity, Tillman was considered a maverick. America was fascinated when he traded the bright lights and riches of the NFL for boot camp and a buzz cut. Sent first to Iraq—a war he would openly declare was “illegal as hell” —and eventually to Afghanistan, Tillman was driven by complicated, emotionally charged, sometimes contradictory notions of duty, honor, justice, patriotism, and masculine pride, and he was determined to serve his entire three-year commitment. But on April 22, 2004, his life would end in a barrage of bullets fired by his fellow soldiers.

Krakauer chronicles Tillman’s riveting, tragic odyssey in engrossing detail highlighting his remarkable character and personality while closely examining the murky, heartbreaking circumstances of his death. Infused with the power and authenticity readers have come to expect from Krakauer’s storytelling, Where Men Win Glory exposes shattering truths about men and war. 


From the Hardcover edition.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 592 pages, 9.2 × 6.09 × 1.2 in

Published: September 15, 2009

Publisher: Diversified Publishing

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0739327631

ISBN - 13: 9780739327630

Found in: Biography and Memoir

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Interesting, Informative, Inspiring, ...and sad I knew of the Pat Tillman story as a professional athlete / patriot who died tragically and, possibly, unnecessarily. This book, which I happened to pick up as a spur of the moment read, was riveting. There was as much to Pat Tillman as a man, a son, and a husband as there was to Pat Tillman as an athlete and soldier. His death was a great loss to his wife, his family, his sport, the Army, and possibly society in general. The actions of the US Government and the Army immediately following Tillman's death were shameful and deplorable. I find myself believing more and more that the greatest threat to world peace in 2012 is the neo-conservative government of the United States and the information in this book certainly reinforces that belief. Still, at the end of the day, this was a very interesting story of a promising young man whose life was wasted by war. How many more will there be?
Date published: 2012-09-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A True Hero I love sports. I do not retain the name of the players and all time money makers as I feel that in most cases, athletes are held up on a pedastol and handsomely reimbursed. This story of Pat Tillman is an amazing tribute to the life of a true hero. Someone who had integrity, character and values that all people should apsire to in life. The story is tragic, but as well know, life is not a fairytale and his courageous decision should be highly regarded and recognized. He dares to do what so little of us could ever and is the reason we remember - we remember those who fought for our freedom. Truly an inpsirational book that made me reflect on myself and what I would do for those who need help. Jon Krakauer shows his ability to not only to tell stories but show his ability as an intellectual author who researches and has carefully thought how his book. I honestly thought that perhaps he had help writing his book Ìnto Thin Air when I first read it, but he has shown to me his true talent in writing.
Date published: 2010-11-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Hero Compared to His Bosses Everyone who has followed current events even slightly over the past five years knows that football hero and soldier Pat Tillman was killed in Afghanistan, and that the military had trouble telling the truth about his death from rifle fire by his own platoon. Tillman had a remarkable life for one who died at age 27, and in _Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman_ (Doubleday), Jon Krakauer has provided the biography that Tillman deserves, vivid and compelling. As good as the biography is, however, it isn't Krakauer's main story, which concentrates on the political and moral crimes committed by the Bush administration and the Army as they tried to convince Americans (and Tillman's family) that Tillman had heroically died shot by Taliban soldiers instead of sadly, futilely dying from friendly fire. Krakauer has drawn his title from Homer, and within the book uses also an epigram by Aeschylus; this is not exaggeration. For one thing, Tillman, in addition to countless other interests, was compelled to study the Greek classics. More importantly, this is a brilliantly-told story of a genuine dramatic tragedy, because readers know how it is going to turn out, and watch as Tillman, compelled by his own sense of duty and self-challenge, is doomed by the fates and the powers that be. Tillman was an extraordinary character, and liked doing things his own way. He drove a Jeep, a car that had no flash, and he kept cats, not dogs. He was an ardent advocate for the rights of homosexuals, and he always had a book handy so that no time was wasted. He had brains, something that football players are not celebrated for, but more importantly, he was introspective and self-critical, constantly writing in his journal about any defects he saw in himself and what he would do to overcome them. (One of the most attractive parts of Krakauer's book is its generous quoting from the journals.) He was a standout as safety for the Arizona Cardinals, earning a fine reputation for playing a smart and aggressive game even though the Cardinals weren't much of a team otherwise. He had a $3.6 million dollar contract coming up, but after 9/11, walked away from it to sign on for the Army for three years. He thought about joining the officer corps, but wanted to be in the immediate action. The Bush administration saw the propaganda value of this young man so devoted to serving his country, but Tillman would not cooperate. He refused interviews and media appearances; he had his job and he wanted just to do it, and he faded into Army obscurity. When he was assigned to Afghanistan, it was not long before he was in the mission that resulted in his death. The mistakes that happened, compounded errors and misjudgments, might be excused as mere manifestations of the fog of war. What is inexcusable is how, after Tillman was shot three times in the head by an American machine gunner, the Army quickly sprang into action to cover up the friendly fire incident. Krakauer writes, "When Pat Tillman was killed in Afghanistan his Ranger regiment responded with a chorus of prevarication and disavowal. A cynical cover-up sanctioned at the highest levels of the government, followed by a series of inept official investigations, cast a cloud of bewilderment and shame over the tragedy, compounding the tragedy of Tillman's death." The military realized that it was going to have a problem keeping up the falsified version of Tillman's death, because his brother was in the same firefight at a different locale, and their buddies in the platoon knew the truth, and eventually at some point they would, even against orders, spill it. Tillman's mother pushed the issue, and got one after another official investigation, each of which lied in different degrees. Krakauer shows that the White House was eager to peddle the story of the hero as a counter to the revolting revelations from Abu Ghraib and to the increasing evidence that Iraq had no weapons of mass destruction. Krakauer's fine book is full of sadness; it is a shame this worthy man had to go to war, it is a shame that he had to die, it is a shame that his death was a terrible accident. Above all, it was a shame that his chain of command, top to bottom, lied to his country and to his family about his fate. Tillman insisted on pushing himself hard to do the right thing; the dishonest and craven actions of his Army chain of command and the Bush administration are in wretched contrast.
Date published: 2010-05-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Recommended It took me 3 weeks to get through the first 3/4 of this book, and one night to finish the last 1/4. When Krakauer examines the night of Pat Tillman's death and the subsequent investigations into the fratricide that caused it, his use of careful detail is necessary and welcomed. However, much of the book is clogged with meticulous notes about the character of Tillman, which seemed unnecessary given his obviously honorable life path. I did really enjoy how Krakauer broke down what is going on during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, as he made it easier to understand for those who are not exactly politically minded.
Date published: 2010-01-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ABSOLUTELY INSPIRING Jon's review of this amazing story was spell binding. I could not put it down. If I had one criticism it would be the lack of photos. I wanted to meet Marie and Kevin and seeing their faces would have accomplished a small part of the book.
Date published: 2010-01-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Mission (Redacted) The latest Jon Krakauer title tells the story of Pat Tillman, the NFL player who left behind a multi-million dollar contract to do what he felt was right: join the Army after 9/11. After he was killed by friendly fire, the army/government made every effort to cover up this fact and make him into a hero. The story of Pat Tillman in Afghanistan is riveting but unfortunately the book takes time to get there. We start with an unnecessary history lesson about Afghanistan going back to the Soviet invasion, as well as stories about Tillman that start to feel like padding (did we really need to know about the time he beat a guy up at a pizza joint?) Once we get to Iraq (where Tillman went first, something he hated) and then Afghanistan, you become riveted with fascinating accounts of battles where, more often that not, army forces are killed by their own people. The tale of the soldiers being strafed and bombed by their own planes will completely unnerve you. The efforts that the army and government go through to cover up what really happened will horrify you the most. Krakauer does an excellent job putting all the pieces together, including all the rules that the Army broke (such as burning Tillman's personal property) as well as all the lies they told to his family and friends. All in all, despite a slow start, this is a fascinating book.
Date published: 2009-11-27

– More About This Product –

Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey Of Pat Tillman

by Jon Krakauer

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 592 pages, 9.2 × 6.09 × 1.2 in

Published: September 15, 2009

Publisher: Diversified Publishing

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0739327631

ISBN - 13: 9780739327630

From the Publisher

The bestselling author of Into the Wild, Into Thin Air, and Under the Banner of Heaven delivers a stunning, eloquent account of a remarkable young man’s haunting journey.

Like the men whose epic stories Jon Krakauer has told in his previous bestsellers, Pat Tillman was an irrepressible individualist and iconoclast. In May 2002, Tillman walked away from his $3.6 million NFL contract to enlist in the United States Army. He was deeply troubled by 9/11, and he felt a strong moral obligation to join the fight against al-Qaeda and the Taliban. Two years later, he died on a desolate hillside in southeastern Afghanistan.

Though obvious to most of the two dozen soldiers on the scene that a ranger in Tillman’s own platoon had fired the fatal shots, the Army aggressively maneuvered to keep this information from Tillman’s wife, other family members, and the American public for five weeks following his death. During this time, President Bush repeatedly invoked Tillman’s name to promote his administration’s foreign policy. Long after Tillman’s nationally televised memorial service, the Army grudgingly notified his closest relatives that he had “probably” been killed by friendly fire while it continued to dissemble about the details of his death and who was responsible.

In Where Men Win Glory, Jon Krakauer draws on Tillman’s journals and letters, interviews with his wife and friends, conversations with the soldiers who served alongside him, and extensive research on the ground in Afghanistan to render an intricate mosaic of this driven, complex, and uncommonly compelling figure as well as the definitive account of the events and actions that led to his death. Before he enlisted in the army, Tillman was familiar to sports aficionados as an undersized, overachieving Arizona Cardinals safety whose virtuosity in the defensive backfield was spellbinding. With his shoulder-length hair, outspoken views, and boundless intellectual curiosity, Tillman was considered a maverick. America was fascinated when he traded the bright lights and riches of the NFL for boot camp and a buzz cut. Sent first to Iraq—a war he would openly declare was “illegal as hell” —and eventually to Afghanistan, Tillman was driven by complicated, emotionally charged, sometimes contradictory notions of duty, honor, justice, patriotism, and masculine pride, and he was determined to serve his entire three-year commitment. But on April 22, 2004, his life would end in a barrage of bullets fired by his fellow soldiers.

Krakauer chronicles Tillman’s riveting, tragic odyssey in engrossing detail highlighting his remarkable character and personality while closely examining the murky, heartbreaking circumstances of his death. Infused with the power and authenticity readers have come to expect from Krakauer’s storytelling, Where Men Win Glory exposes shattering truths about men and war. 


From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

JON KRAKAUER is the author of Eiger Dreams, Into the Wild, Into Thin Air, and Under the Banner of Heaven and is the editor of the Modern Library Exploration series.


From the Hardcover edition.

Editorial Reviews

"Jon Krakauer has done his job well; Where Men Win Glory is a tough read...[He] has tackled a task that required the distillation and organization of volumes of disparate information.  That he has fielded a coherent narrative is a victory.  that he has made it compelling and passionate is a difficult blessing...In mining Tillman''s life and death, Krakauer uncovers a story much more compelling than anything that could be spun." - The Denver Post "Krakauer -- whose forenseic studies of the Emrsonian Man in books such as Into Thin Air and Into the Wild yield so much insight -- has turned in a beautiful bit of reporting, documenting Tillman''s life with journals and interviews with those close to him...Must be counted as the definitive version of events surrounding Tillman''s death." --The Los Angeles Times "In this wrenching account of the life and eath of NFL star Pat Tillman, killed in friendly fire in Afghanistan in 2004, Krakauer brilliants turns investigative reporter...Krakauer will break your heart recounting how the military lied about Pat''s death to his parents and fellow soldier Kevin." -- People "In this masterful work, bestselling adventure writer Jon Krakauer renders an intimate portrait of Tillman and brilliantly captures the sadness, madness, and heroism of the post-9/11 world...Drawing on interviews with family, fellow soldiers and correspondence, Krakauer''s page-turning account captures every detail -- Tillman''s extraordinary character, including t
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