Cool Runnings

Directed by Jon Turteltaub

Buena Vista Home Video | September 3, 2002 | DVD

Cool Runnings is rated 5 out of 5 by 2.
When a fellow competitor trips Derice at an Olympic qualifying track meet, Derice fails to acquire the final points necessary to get to the summer games. To make matters worse, the local board refuses to reinstate Derice. But there's still way for him to make it to the Olympics. After learning about a wacky American bobsledder living in Jamaica -- who had years earlier attempted to recruit Derice's father for a Jamaican bobsled team -- Derice's competitive spirit is renewed. Realizing that bobsledding may be his golden opportunity, he drafts his go-cart driving buddy Sanka, and talks Winter Olympian Irv Blitzer into coaching this offbeat team. Blitzer whips the dedicated athletes into bobsledding shape despite the total absence of snow. Together they're the weirdest outfit at Calgary -- but no one's more fun at the winter games.

Video Release: September 3, 2002

Theatrical Release: 1993

Runtime: 98

Rating: PG (MPAA)

Studio: Buena Vista Home Video

UPC: 717951002754

Found in: General

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from "One Dream. Four Jamaicans. Twenty Below Zero." The first time I saw this movie was years ago. I watched it with my family which made it even more memorable. John Candy has always been one of my favourite Canadian actors and he plays a great role in this one of a kind classic. It's a feel good heart warming story that will make you laugh over and over. Favourtie quote from the movie: Yul Brenner: Look in the mirror, and tell me what you see! Junior Bevill: I see Junior. Yul Brenner: You see Junior? Well, let me tell you what I see. I see pride! I see power! I see a bad-ass mother who don't take no crap off of nobody! It's perfect to get you in the mood for the Olympics! When I saw the Jamaican athlete walk out during the opening ceremonies I automatically thought of this movie. Go Canada Go! Enjoy
Date published: 2010-02-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Funny, heartwarming...truly one of my all time favorite films. Cool Runnings' is one of those movies I can watch over and over again and never get sick of it. Based on a true story that is both touching and inspirational, Jon Turteltaub does a magnificent job of infusing enough humor and wit into this script to make it one of the most entertaining movies I've ever seen. The story is about a young group of Jamaicans who are vying for a way to the Olympics. Derice Bannock (Leon) has dreamed of running in the Olympics all his life. His father was a famous Olympic runner and he dreamed of doing the same. Junior Bevil (Lewis) lives under the strict watch of his wealthy father who humors Junior's fantasy about running in the Olympics but doesn't wholeheartedly support it. And then we have Yul Brenner (Yoba) who lacks a good education but makes up for that with brute strength and arrogance. On the day of the tryouts Junior takes a fall and trips up Yul and Derice ending all of their chances to make it to the Olympics. That is until they meet Irving Blitzer (Candy), an ex-bobsledder who knew Derice's father when they were in the Olympics together. Irving had always believed that runners would make the best Bobsled team and now he had the opportunity to try that out. With the help of Sanka Coffie (Doug E. Doug) they form the first Jamaican Bobsled team and head off to Canada to compete. They are met with serious scrutiny, not only because they are Jamaican but also because their coach, Irv, is hated among the Olympic community. Irving was disqualified back in his Olympic days for hiding weights in the front of a sled to make it go faster, thus disqualifying, and humiliating his country, his teammates and his coach. Thus, they don't like him very much and because of that the Jamaicans have to work extra hard to make an impression. The film has plenty of funny scenes but it also has plenty of heart and by the end of the movie you'll be wiping away the tears and pushing through with a smile. They don't make many movies like this one, so when they do we need to grab them and never let go. `Cool Runnings' is definitely a one of a kind film, a film that's entertaining and suitable for the whole family, and one that any DVD library would be incomplete without!
Date published: 2009-07-22

– More About This Product –

Cool Runnings

Directed by Jon Turteltaub

Video Release: September 3, 2002

Theatrical Release: 1993

Runtime: 98

Rating: PG (MPAA)

Studio: Buena Vista Home Video

UPC: 717951002754


Edition Description
  • Closed Captioned
  • Color
  • Runtime: 98 minutes
  • NTSC (Canada and USA)
  • Originally in English
  • Released in English

Synopsis

When a fellow competitor trips Derice at an Olympic qualifying track meet, Derice fails to acquire the final points necessary to get to the summer games. To make matters worse, the local board refuses to reinstate Derice. But there's still way for him to make it to the Olympics. After learning about a wacky American bobsledder living in Jamaica -- who had years earlier attempted to recruit Derice's father for a Jamaican bobsled team -- Derice's competitive spirit is renewed. Realizing that bobsledding may be his golden opportunity, he drafts his go-cart driving buddy Sanka, and talks Winter Olympian Irv Blitzer into coaching this offbeat team. Blitzer whips the dedicated athletes into bobsledding shape despite the total absence of snow. Together they're the weirdest outfit at Calgary -- but no one's more fun at the winter games.

Description

The semi-true story of the Jamaican Olympic Bobsled Team.

Notes

"Cool Runnings" is based on the true story of the Jamaican bobsled team, who became audience favorites as beloved underdogs in the 1988 Olympic games. Rated BBFC PG by the British Board of Film Classification.