Much Afraid [ECD]

Performers Jars Of Clay

Silvertone Records | September 16, 1997 | Compact Disc

Not yet rated | write a review
MUCH AFRAID is an Enhanced CD containing both a full audio program as well as multimedia computer files. Jars Of Clay: Dan Haseltine (vocals, percussion); Matthew Odmark (guitar, mandolin, vocals); Stephen Mason (guitar, bass, vocals); Charlie Lowell (keyboards, piano, organ, vocals). Additional personnel: Kate St. John (English Horn); Greg Wells (bass, drums, percussion); Neil Conti (drums); Nashville strings, London strings. Recorded at The Aquarium, London, England; Secret Sound, Franklin, Tennessee; 16th Avenue Sound, Nashville, Tennessee. MUCH AFRAID won the 1998 Grammy Award for Best Pop/Contemporary Gospel Album. The follow-up to Jars of Clay's almost minimalist first album features a bigger sound, with a wider lyrical scope and a more solid, grownup production (by Steve Lipson, of Sting and Annie Lennox fame). These new developments give MUCH AFRAID a real sense of staying power. The Christian alternative rock group appears to have broken out of the often-narrow confines of the genre. There's a hint of psychedelia on "Overjoyed," some Bee Gees-style harmonizing on "Tea and Sympathy," and lush, '70s rock-esque arrangements throughout. Spirituality plays a more subtle role on MUCH AFRAID, but continues to be a vital theme. On songs like "Overjoyed" it is sometimes difficult to separate the personal from the divine. And that's probably just the way the band wants it.

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: September 16, 1997

Genre: Contemp. Christian

Style: Gospel

Number of Discs: 1

Stereo/Mono: Stereo

Studio/Mixed/Live: Studio

Originally Released: 1997

Label Name: Silvertone Records

UPC: 012414406026

Found in: Contemporary - Christian

save 22%

  • Out of stock online

$16.99  ea

Online Price

$21.99 List Price

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Much Afraid [ECD]

Performers Jars Of Clay
Guest Artist(s) Kate St. John
Producer Stephen Lipson
Engineer Heff Moraes, Mike Griffith

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: September 16, 1997

Genre: Contemp. Christian

Style: Gospel

Number of Discs: 1

Stereo/Mono: Stereo

Studio/Mixed/Live: Studio

Originally Released: 1997

Label Name: Silvertone Records

UPC: 012414406026


Title Track Time
1.Overjoyed --
2.Fade To Grey --
3.Tea And Sympathy --
4.Crazy Times --
5.Frail --
6.Five Candles (You Were There) --
7.Weighed Down --
8.Portrait Of An Apology --
9.Truce --
10.Much Afraid --
11.Hymn --
12.(Non-Audio Content) --

Editorial Notes

MUCH AFRAID is an Enhanced CD containing both a full audio program as well as multimedia computer files. Jars Of Clay: Dan Haseltine (vocals, percussion); Matthew Odmark (guitar, mandolin, vocals); Stephen Mason (guitar, bass, vocals); Charlie Lowell (keyboards, piano, organ, vocals). Additional personnel: Kate St. John (English Horn); Greg Wells (bass, drums, percussion); Neil Conti (drums); Nashville strings, London strings. Recorded at The Aquarium, London, England; Secret Sound, Franklin, Tennessee; 16th Avenue Sound, Nashville, Tennessee. MUCH AFRAID won the 1998 Grammy Award for Best Pop/Contemporary Gospel Album. The follow-up to Jars of Clay's almost minimalist first album features a bigger sound, with a wider lyrical scope and a more solid, grownup production (by Steve Lipson, of Sting and Annie Lennox fame). These new developments give MUCH AFRAID a real sense of staying power. The Christian alternative rock group appears to have broken out of the often-narrow confines of the genre. There's a hint of psychedelia on "Overjoyed," some Bee Gees-style harmonizing on "Tea and Sympathy," and lush, '70s rock-esque arrangements throughout. Spirituality plays a more subtle role on MUCH AFRAID, but continues to be a vital theme. On songs like "Overjoyed" it is sometimes difficult to separate the personal from the divine. And that's probably just the way the band wants it.