Violent Hearts

Performers Shimmering Stars

Hardly Art | September 13, 2011 | Compact Disc

Not yet rated | write a review
Personnel: Rory McClure (vocals, guitar); Andrew Dergousoff (vocals, drums); Brent Sasaki (vocals).
Audio Mixer: Felix Fung.
Recording information: The Garage Mahal, Kamloops, BC.
On their debut album, Violent Hearts, Vancouver trio Shimmering Stars delve deeply into the ghostly sounds of 1950s and early-'60s pop and come up with a sound both older than a scratchy old 45 and as current as the latest MP3 you downloaded but didn't listen to. The guitar-bass-drums sound the group uses is simple as can be, nimbly running through familiar chord changes as the vocals (usually sung by guitarist Rory McClure but bolstered by drummer Andrew Dergousoff and bassist Brent Sasaki) float over the top like melancholy clouds. Applying this effectively direct approach to some very catchy and sweetly sad and romantic songs, they then dip the entire thing in buckets and buckets of cavernous reverb to give the record a pleasingly warm and shambolic feel. It likely would have worked without the smeared and hazy surfaces, but the sound has a haunting quality that helps the songs sink in deeper. Split between Brill Building-inspired ballads that wrench and tug at the old familiar heartstrings (like the careening "Sun's Going Down" and the painfully slow-burning "Sabians") and more uptempo tracks that have a bit of bounce (like the should-be-a-hit single "I'm Gonna Try" and the rollicking soda shop jams "I Don't Wanna Know" and "Dancing to Music I Hate"), the record is full of songs that have sharp hooks and memorable melodies. There may not be a single moment of musical originality here but they dig up the past like the best gravediggers around, rebuilding the old scavenged parts into something full of life and rambunctious, heartbreakingly real energy. Violent Hearts is a resoundingly successful debut that puts the band right at the front of the line of all the reverb-heavy, backward-looking indie pop bands that overran the music scene like seagulls on the beach at low tide in the early part of the decade. ~ Tim Sendra

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: September 13, 2011

Genre: Lo Fi

Style: Rock & Pop

Number of Discs: 1

Label Name: Hardly Art

UPC: 098787304121

Found in: Lo Fi

save 0%

  • Ships within 1-2 weeks

$17.15  ea

$17.15 List Price

or, Used from $6.05

eGift this item

Give this item in the form of an eGift Card.

+ what is this?

This item is eligible for FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25.
See details

Easy, FREE returns. See details

Item can only be shipped in Canada

Downloads instantly to your kobo or other ereading device. See details

Reviews

– More About This Product –

Violent Hearts

Performers Shimmering Stars

Format: Compact Disc

Released Date: September 13, 2011

Genre: Lo Fi

Style: Rock & Pop

Number of Discs: 1

Label Name: Hardly Art

UPC: 098787304121


Title Track Time
1.Believe --
2.I'm Gonna Try --
3.No One --
4.East Van Girls --
5.Into the Sea --
6.Nervous Breakdown --
7.Privilege --
8.Sun's Going Down --
9.Sabians --
10.Dancing To Music I Hate --
11.I Don't Wanna Know --
12.Other Girls --
13.Did I Lose You --
14.Walk Away --

Editorial Notes

Personnel: Rory McClure (vocals, guitar); Andrew Dergousoff (vocals, drums); Brent Sasaki (vocals).
Audio Mixer: Felix Fung.
Recording information: The Garage Mahal, Kamloops, BC.
On their debut album, Violent Hearts, Vancouver trio Shimmering Stars delve deeply into the ghostly sounds of 1950s and early-'60s pop and come up with a sound both older than a scratchy old 45 and as current as the latest MP3 you downloaded but didn't listen to. The guitar-bass-drums sound the group uses is simple as can be, nimbly running through familiar chord changes as the vocals (usually sung by guitarist Rory McClure but bolstered by drummer Andrew Dergousoff and bassist Brent Sasaki) float over the top like melancholy clouds. Applying this effectively direct approach to some very catchy and sweetly sad and romantic songs, they then dip the entire thing in buckets and buckets of cavernous reverb to give the record a pleasingly warm and shambolic feel. It likely would have worked without the smeared and hazy surfaces, but the sound has a haunting quality that helps the songs sink in deeper. Split between Brill Building-inspired ballads that wrench and tug at the old familiar heartstrings (like the careening "Sun's Going Down" and the painfully slow-burning "Sabians") and more uptempo tracks that have a bit of bounce (like the should-be-a-hit single "I'm Gonna Try" and the rollicking soda shop jams "I Don't Wanna Know" and "Dancing to Music I Hate"), the record is full of songs that have sharp hooks and memorable melodies. There may not be a single moment of musical originality here but they dig up the past like the best gravediggers around, rebuilding the old scavenged parts into something full of life and rambunctious, heartbreakingly real energy. Violent Hearts is a resoundingly successful debut that puts the band right at the front of the line of all the reverb-heavy, backward-looking indie pop bands that overran the music scene like seagulls on the beach at low tide in the early part of the decade. ~ Tim Sendra