Caddie Woodlawn

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Caddie Woodlawn

by Carol Ryrie Brink
Illustrator Trina Schart Hyman

Simon Pulse | November 1, 1997 | Mass Market Paperbound

Caddie Woodlawn is rated 5 out of 5 by 1.
Caddie Woodlawn, which has been captivating young readers since 1935, was awarded the John Newbery Medal for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. Now it is in a brand-new edition with lively illustrations by Trina Schart Hyman. In her new foreword, Carol Ryrie Brink lovingly recalls the real Caddie, who was her grandmother, and tells how she often "sat spellbound, listening, listening!" as Caddie told stories of her pioneer childhood. Children everywhere will love redheaded Caddie with her penchant for pranks. Scarcely out of one scrape before she is into another, she refuses to be a "lady," preferring instead to run the woods with her brothers. Whether she is crossing the lake on a raft, visiting an Indian camp, or listening to the tales of the circuit rider, Caddie's adventures provide an exciting and authentic picture of life on the Wisconsin frontier in the 1860s. And readers will discover, as Caddie learns what growing up truly means, that it is not so very different today.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 288 pages, 8.5 × 6 × 0.8 in

Published: November 1, 1997

Publisher: Simon Pulse

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0689815212

ISBN - 13: 9780689815218

Appropriate for ages: 8

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it! Caddie is an excellent role model for young girls! I read this historical fiction classic aloud to my children. It takes place in 1864 during the pioneer days, and it won the 1936 Newbery Medal. Caddie is 11 years old, and she is a tomboy who feels more comfortable roughhousing with her brothers (Tom, age 13 and Warren, age 9) than cooking and sewing with her sisters. Interestingly, the adventurous children in the Woodlawn family were the red-headed ones, and the dark-haired ones were more proper. The family moved from Boston to Wisconsin, and both Caddie and her sister, Mary, were frail and weak. After little Mary died, Father begged Mother to let him try an experiment with Caddie because he was desperate not to lose another child. He wanted Caddie to be allowed to play in the sunshine because he believed it would restore her health. He didn't want her to be keep indoors being raised as a proper young lady. He was right. Caddie thrived, and she was the apple of her father's eye. Across the Menomonie River, there lived a local Native American tribe. Caddie struck up a friendship with the Chief, whom the kids called Indian John, and the natives were fascinated with the red-haired children. They did not mind when the kids crossed the river to come for a visit. A rumour runs rampant among the white settlers that the natives are planning a massacre, which was what happened two years before when the Minnesota Natives killed over one thousand white settlers. Because of this, most of the settlers are apprehensive about the natives. Father does not believe that the rumour is true because he trusts the honour of Indian John and his tribe. The settlers are afraid, and they band together so that they can be united in the event that a massacre does occur. Father assures his neighbours that there is nothing to fear, but he still invites them to stay at the Woodlawn farm. Caddie overhears some of the men discussing the situation, and they want to take the offensive position and attack the natives instead of waiting to see what will happen. She is horrified, and she feels she must go and warn Indian John before it is too late. Wow, what a fantastic story! Caddie is such an excellent role model for young girls. She is courageous, thoughtful, and fiercely loyal to those she loves. She refuses to be swayed by the opinions of others, and she is not afraid to be the one in the crowd who is different. She stands up for what she believes in, even when she is in the minority. She has more character than many adults. We loved this book, and I highly recommend it! We have already bought the companion story, Caddie Woodlawn's Family.
Date published: 2013-08-07

– More About This Product –

Caddie Woodlawn

by Carol Ryrie Brink
Illustrator Trina Schart Hyman

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 288 pages, 8.5 × 6 × 0.8 in

Published: November 1, 1997

Publisher: Simon Pulse

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0689815212

ISBN - 13: 9780689815218

From the Publisher

Caddie Woodlawn, which has been captivating young readers since 1935, was awarded the John Newbery Medal for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. Now it is in a brand-new edition with lively illustrations by Trina Schart Hyman. In her new foreword, Carol Ryrie Brink lovingly recalls the real Caddie, who was her grandmother, and tells how she often "sat spellbound, listening, listening!" as Caddie told stories of her pioneer childhood. Children everywhere will love redheaded Caddie with her penchant for pranks. Scarcely out of one scrape before she is into another, she refuses to be a "lady," preferring instead to run the woods with her brothers. Whether she is crossing the lake on a raft, visiting an Indian camp, or listening to the tales of the circuit rider, Caddie's adventures provide an exciting and authentic picture of life on the Wisconsin frontier in the 1860s. And readers will discover, as Caddie learns what growing up truly means, that it is not so very different today.

About the Author

Trina Schart Hyman was born on April 8, 1939 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She studied at the Philadelphia Museum College of Art, the Boston Museum School of Art, and Konstfackskolan, the Swedish State Art School. While living in Sweden, she got her first illustration job with Brown and Little. Her first work, Toffe and the Little Car, was published in 1961. During her lifetime, she illustrate over 150 children's books. She received numerous awards including a Horn Award for King Stork in 1973, the Caldecott Medal for Margaret Hodges's St. George and the Dragon: A Golden Legend Adapted from Edmund Spenser's 'Faerie Queen', and Caldecott honors three times for Little Red Riding Hood, A Child's Calendar, and Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins. She also wrote and illustrated her own books including How Six Found Christmas, A Little Alphabet, Little Red Riding Hood, and Self-Portrait: Trina Schart Hyman. She joined the staff of Cricket magazine for children as an artist and illustrator in 1972 and became its art director before leaving in 1979. She died from complications of breast cancer on November 19, 2004 at the age of 65.

From Our Editors

This beloved story follows the frontier adventures of Caddie Woodlawn, a tomboy growing up in Wisconsin during the 1860s. More likely to plow than bake, she's the despair of her mother and older sister. But when Indians threaten to massacre the settlers, it's Caddie who saves the day.

Editorial Reviews

"You take Little House on the Prairie; I'll take Caddie Woodlawn."

-- Jim Trelease, author of The Read-Aloud Handbook

Appropriate for ages: 8