A Tour in America, in 1798, 1799, and 1800; Exhibiting Sketches of Soc. and Manners, and a Particular Account of the American System of Agriculture,

Cover may not be exactly as depicted

A Tour in America, in 1798, 1799, and 1800; Exhibiting Sketches of Soc. and Manners, and a Particular Account of the American System of Agriculture,

by Richard Parkinson

Used & Rare price

SPECIAL SHIPPING CONSIDERATIONS FOR USED & RARE ITEMS.

Please see the special considerations for shipping Used & Rare items, including extended delivery times, possible import duties & taxes.

Delivered in 3-5 weeks

Format: Trade paperback

Publisher: Rarebooksclub.com

Condition:

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1235615308

ISBN - 13:9781235615306

Seller Comments:

Trade paperback (US). Glued binding. 50 p. Contains: Illustrations, black & white.

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1805 edition. Excerpt: ... TOUR IN AMERICA. SECTION I. An Account of my Tour from my first Landing in America, to the Time of my settling at Orange-Hill, near Baltimore; being a Period of five Months. I Sailed from Liverpool, September 3d, 1798; and, after a. very long and bad passage, arrived at Norfolk in Virginia, on the llth of November. During my stay of four days in this town, I met with many English gentlemen; and was very pleasantly treated,--particularly by Mr. Cox, a gentleman from Derbyshire. When I was first Introduced here, the conversation, as the company were seated at dinner, was on politics; and the Englishmen were all for England, and great supporters of the crown and its dignity. Mr. Cox being in the chair, the King of England was the first health, and Mr. Pitt next. After dinner was over, I began to inquire for some hay for my horses and cattle; but was told there was no such thing. I was astonished to find in so large a town, where a great number of horses, mules, and cows, were kept, no hay, and in the month of November too. The people seemed as much surprised at my asking for hay, as I was at there being none: and well they might; for when I walked out into the ground, I saw no such thing as grass growing, nor any sort of green herb., This to me, as an Englishman, was a very unusual spectacle; to see land without something upon it: and not a little mortifying, to one who had been tempted to believe it to be (as they term it) the best land in the world. I knew that if all their land was like that, a man could not live in plenty and splendor from the produce of such crops as it would bring. It was natural for me now to inquire, what they kept their cows and horses on during the winter. They told me--their horses on blades, and their cows on...